The Front Page (1974)

The Front Page (1974)

When Hildy Johnson, the top reporter of a Chicago newspaper announces that he is quitting to get married, his editor, Walter Burns desperately tries to change his mind.

When denial, cursing, and luring don’t work, Walter resorts to tricks. It’s the day before a supposed communist is to be hanged, and all Chicago waits with baited breath. Meanwhile, each of the papers has a man on the story trying to get a scoop or angle for themselves. With a train to catch at midnight to join his fiancé, Hildy is at first not interested, but events and his own habits work against him as the day unfolds, and he can’t help but get roped in, especially when the man to be executed escapes and then almost literally falls into his lap.

The Front Page is a 1974 American comedy-drama film directed by Billy Wilder and starring Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau. The screenplay by Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond is based on Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur’s play of the same name (1928), which inspired several other films.

About the Story

Chicago Examiner reporter Hildebrand “Hildy” Johnson (Jack Lemmon) has just quit his job in order to marry Peggy Grant (Susan Sarandon) and start a new career, when convict Earl Williams (Austin Pendleton) escapes from death row just prior to his execution. Earl is an impoverished, bumbling leftist whose only offense is stuffing fortune cookies with messages demanding the release of Sacco and Vanzetti, but the yellow press of Chicago has painted him as a dangerous threat from Moscow. As a result, the citizenry are anxious to see him put to death.

Earl has not left the jail, and enters the prison pressroom while Hildy is alone there. Hildy cannot resist the lure of what could be the biggest scoop of his soon-to-be-over career. Ruthless, egomaniacal managing editor Walter Burns (Walter Matthau), desperate to keep Hildy on the job, encourages him to cover the story, frustrating Peggy, who is eager to catch their train. When Earl is in danger of being discovered, Mollie Malloy (Carol Burnett), a self-described “$2 whore from Division Street” who befriended Earl, creates a distraction by leaping from the third-floor window.

When Earl is caught, Hildy and Walter are arrested for aiding and abetting a fugitive, but are released when they discover that the mayor and sheriff colluded to conceal Earl’s last-minute reprieve by the governor. Walter grudgingly accepts that he is losing his ace reporter and presents him with a watch as a token of his appreciation. Hildy and Peggy set off to get married, and Walter telegraphs the next railway station to alert them that the man who stole his watch is on the inbound train and should be apprehended by the police.

The Front Page (1974) Movie Poster

The Front Page (1974)

Directed by: Billy Wilder
Starring: Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau, Susan Sarandon, Vincent Gardenia, David Wayne, Allen Garfield, Austin Pendleton
Screenplay by: Billy Wilder, I.A.L. Diamond
Cinematography by: Jordan Cronenweth
Film Editing by: Ralph E. Winters
Costume Design by: Burton Miller
Set Decoration by: James W. Payne
Distributed by: Universal Pictures
Release Date: December 17, 1974

Same Time, Next Year (1978)

Same Time, Next Year (1978)

In 1951, at an inn located on the Mendocino County coast, Doris (Ellen Burstyn), a 24-year-old housewife from Oakland, meets George (Alan Alda) a 27-year-old accountant from New Jersey at dinner. They have a sexual tryst, and then agree to meet once a year to rekindle the sparks they experience at their first meeting, despite the fact that both are happily married, with six children between them. They each discuss their respective yet unseen spouses, “Harry” and “Helen.”

Over the course of the next 26 years, they develop an emotional intimacy deeper than what one would expect to find between two people meeting for a clandestine relationship just once a year. During the time they spend with each other, they discuss births, deaths, including George’s son Michael dying in Vietnam, which changes George politically, and marital problems each experiences at home, while they adapt themselves to the social changes affecting their lives.

At their meeting in 1977, George explains that his wife, Helen, has died of cancer earlier in the year, and revealed to a friend that she had known of the affair for 10 years without telling George. Now a widower, George proposes to Doris who refuses to accept because of her loyalty to, and respect for, Harry. Rejected, George leaves for good, only to return with the promise to continue the affair as long as they are able.

Same Time, Next Year is a 1978 American romantic comedy-drama film directed by Robert Mulligan. The screenplay by Bernard Slade is based on his 1975 play of the same title. The film stars Alan Alda and Ellen Burstyn.

Same Time, Next Year (1978) Movie Poster

Same Time, Next Year (1978)

Directed by: Robert Mulligan
Starring; Alan Alda, Ellen Burstyn, Ivan Bonar, Bernie Kuby, Cosmo Sardo, David Northcutt, William Cantrell
Screenplay by: Bernard Slade
Production Design by: Henry Bumstead
Cinematography by: Robert Surtees
Film Editing by: Sheldon Kahn
Costume Design by: Theadora Van Runkle
Set Decoration by: Hal Gausman
Music by: Marvin Hamlisch
Distributed by: Universal Pictures
Release Date: November 22, 1978

The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976)

The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976)

Charles Dreyfus escapes from the mental asylum and tries to kill Chief Inspector Jacques Clouseau. He doesn’t succeed at first, so he takes on another strategy, namely to build a Doomsday machine and demand that someone else kills Jacques Clouseau, or Dreyfus will use the machine to wipe out whole cities and even whole countries… With about 22 assassins from all over the globe on his tail, Clouseau decides to find Dreyfus alone and put him back in the mental asylum.

The Pink Panther Strikes Again is the fifth film in The Pink Panther series and picks up where The Return of the Pink Panther leaves off. Released in 1976, Strikes Again is the third entry to include the words Pink Panther in its title, although the story does not involve the Pink Panther diamond. Unused footage from the film was later included in Trail of the Pink Panther.

The Pink Panther Strikes Again Movie Poster (1976)

The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976)

Directed by: Blake Edwards
Starring: Peter Sellers, Herbert Lom, Lesley-Anne Down, Burt Kwouk, Leonard Rossiter, André Maranne, Richard Vernon, Dudley Sutton
Screenplay by: Frank Waldman, Blake Edwards
Production Design by: Peter Mullins
Cinematography by: Harry Waxman
Film Editing by: Alan Jones
Art Direction by: John Siddall
Music by: Henry Mancini
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: December 15, 1976

Murder on the Orient Express (1974)

Murder on the Orient Express (1974)

Taglines: The greatest cast of suspicious characters ever involved in murder.

The film features the Belgian detective Hercule Poirot. Albert Finney stars as Poirot, who is asked by his friend Bianchi (Martin Balsam), a train company director, to investigate the murder of an American business tycoon, Mr. Samuel Ratchett (Richard Widmark), when all are aboard the Orient Express train.

The suspects are portrayed by an all-star cast, including Lauren Bacall, Ingrid Bergman (delivering an Oscar-winning performance), Sean Connery, John Gielgud, Vanessa Redgrave, Michael York, Jacqueline Bisset and Anthony Perkins. The screenplay is by Paul Dehn as well as an uncredited Anthony Shaffer.

Richard Rodney Bennett’s Orient Express theme has been reworked into an orchestral suite and performed and recorded several times. It was performed on the original soundtrack album by the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden under Marcus Dods. The piano soloist was the composer himself.

Murder on the Orient Express is a 1974 British mystery film in Panavision directed by Sidney Lumet, starring Albert Finney as Hercule Poirot, and based on the 1934 novel Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie.

Murder on the Orient Express Movie Poster (1974)

Murder on the Orient Express (1974)

Directed by: Sidney Lumet
Starring: Albert Finney, Lauren Bacall, Ingrid Bergman, Martin Balsam, Jacqueline Bisset, Jean-Pierre Cassel, Sean Connery, Wendy Hiller, Anthony Perkins, Vanessa Redgrave
Screenplay by: Paul Dehn
Production Design by: Tony Walton
Cinematography by: Geoffrey Unsworth
Film Editing by: Anne V. Coates
Costume Design by: Tony Walton
Art Direction by: Jack Stephens
Music by: Richard Rodney Bennett
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: November 24, 1974

Young Frankenstein (1974)

Young Frankenstein (1974)

Taglines: The scariest comedy of all time!

A young neurosurgeon (Gene Wilder) inherits the castle of his grandfather, the famous Dr. Victor von Frankenstein. In the castle he finds a funny hunchback called Igor, a pretty lab assistant named Inga and the old housekeeper, frau Blucher -iiiiihhh!-. Young Frankenstein believes that the work of his grandfather is only crap, but when he discovers the book where the mad doctor described his reanimation experiment, he suddenly changes his mind.

Young Frankenstein is a 1974 American horror comedy film directed by Mel Brooks and starring Gene Wilder as the title character, a descendant of the infamous Dr. Victor Frankenstein. The supporting cast includes Teri Garr, Cloris Leachman, Marty Feldman, Peter Boyle, Madeline Kahn, Kenneth Mars, Richard Haydn and Gene Hackman. The screenplay was written by Wilder and Brooks.

The film is an affectionate parody of the classic horror film genre, in particular the various film adaptations of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein produced by Universal in the 1930s. Most of the lab equipment used as props was created by Kenneth Strickfaden for the 1931 film Frankenstein. To help evoke the atmosphere of the earlier films, Brooks shot the picture entirely in black-and-white, a rarity in the 1970s, and employed 1930s-style opening credits and scene transitions such as iris outs, wipes, and fades to black. The film also features a period score by Brooks’ longtime composer John Morris.

A critical favorite and box office smash, Young Frankenstein ranks No. 28 on Total Film magazine’s readers’ “List of the 50 Greatest Comedy Films of All Time”, No. 56 on Bravo TV’s list of the “100 Funniest Movies”, and No. 13 on the American Film Institute’s list of the 100 funniest American movies. In 2003, it was deemed “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant” by the United States National Film Preservation Board, and selected for preservation in the Library of Congress National Film Registry. On its 40th anniversary, Brooks considered it by far his finest film as writer-producer (albeit not his funniest film).

Young Frankenstein Movie Poster (1974)

Young Frankenstein (1974)

Directed by: Mel Brooks
Starring: Gene Wilder, Madeline Kahn, Marty Feldman, Peter Boyle, Cloris Leachman, Teri Garr, Kenneth Mars, Richard Haydn
Screenplay by: Gene Wilder, Mel Brooks
Production Design by: Dale Hennesy
Cinematography by: Gerald Hirschfeld
Film Editing by: John C. Howard
Costume Design by: Dorothy Jeakins
Set Decoration by: Robert De Vestel
Music by: John Morris
Distributed by: 20th Century Fox
Release Date: December 15, 1974

Grease (1978)

Grease (1978)

Taglines: Grease is the word.

In the summer of 1958, Sandy Olsson (Newton-John) meets local boy Danny Zuko (Travolta) at the beach while on vacation and they soon fall in love. As the summer comes to an end, Sandy worries about returning home to Australia and never seeing Danny again, but he assures her that it is only the beginning for them.

On the first day of their senior year at Rydell High, Danny, the leader of a greaser gang known as the T-Birds, meets with his fellow T-Birds, Kenickie (Jeff Conaway) (second-in-command and Danny’s best friend), Sonny (Michael Tucci), Doody (Barry Pearl), and Putzie (Kelly Ward), and they all catch up on what they did over the summer. Danny briefly mentions that he met a girl and they joke around with it.

Sandy, meanwhile, enrolls at Rydell after an apparent change in her plans but is unaware of Danny’s presence, as is he of hers. Sandy has made friends with Frenchy (Didi Conn), a member of the Pink Ladies, an associated female equivalent of the T-Birds. Frenchie introduces Sandy to fellow Pink Ladies Rizzo (Stockard Channing), the group’s leader, Jan (Jamie Donnelly), and Marty (Dinah Manoff). Rizzo notes she looks “too pure to be Pink.”

Grease (1978)

At lunch, Sandy tells them about meeting an amazing boy over the summer and falling in love (“Summer Nights”). After Rizzo discovers she is speaking of Danny, her ex-boyfriend, she deviously arranges a surprise meeting at a pep rally. Despite his excitement at seeing her, Danny acts indifferently in an effort to protect his cool reputation, causing Sandy to run off in disgust. Frenchy invites Sandy over to her house to join the rest of the girls for a slumber party that night to cheer her up

At the party, Rizzo mocks Sandy (“Look at Me, I’m Sandra Dee”) and the other girls join in, until Sandy overhears and goes outside to be alone where she laments missing Danny (“Hopelessly Devoted to You”). The T-Birds crash the party and Rizzo ends up driving off alone with Kenickie. Later, their makeout session is interrupted by Leo (Dennis C. Stewart), the leader of the Scorpions, a rival greaser gang from another high school. Leo rear-ends Kenickie’s car, insults them, and drives away.

After the T-Birds help repair Kenickie’s car (“Greased Lightnin'”) in autoshop class, Danny asks Coach Calhoun (Sid Caesar) to help him find a sport so he can impress Sandy, who has begun dating Tom (Lorenzo Lamas), one of the school’s football players. After trying various sports, Danny eventually discovers an aptitude for track and rekindles his relationship with Sandy.

They attempt a date at the Frosty Palace, a local malt shop hangout, but their date is crashed by both the Pink Ladies and the T-Birds, who are gradually pairing off. Kenickie and Rizzo have an argument and the two groups depart, leaving Frenchy alone to ponder the wisdom of dropping out of high school to attend beauty school after a mistake in hair dyeing class turned her hair bubblegum pink. She is then visited by her guardian angel (Frankie Avalon), who urges her to return to high school (“Beauty School Dropout”).

A few weeks later, the school dance arrives. Rydell High had been picked for a live national TV broadcast on National Bandstand, hosted by DJ Vince Fontaine (Edd Byrnes) (a fictional version of Alan Freed), who flirts with Marty throughout the night. Rizzo and Kenickie attempt to score off each other by bringing Leo and his on-and-off girlfriend Cha Cha (Annette Charles), who was with Leo when he interrupted their makeout session, respectively as their dates, while Danny and Sandy go together. During the final dance, Danny and Cha Cha (who were also once boyfriend and girlfriend) perform together and win the national dance-off (“Born to Hand Jive”), which hurts Sandy’s feelings. She leaves alone.

Grease is a 1978 American musical romantic comedy film directed by Randal Kleiser and produced by Paramount Pictures. The film is an adaptation of Warren Casey and Jim Jacobs’ 1971 musical of the same name about two lovers in a 1950s high school. The film stars John Travolta, Olivia Newton-John, Stockard Channing and Jeff Conaway.

Released on June 16, 1978, the film was successful both critically and financially at the box office, becoming the highest grossing film of the year. As of 2016, the film remains the highest-grossing movie musical in the United States. Its soundtrack album ended 1978 as the second-best selling album of the year in the U.S., behind the soundtrack of Saturday Night Fever, another film starring Travolta. The soundtrack is also the top-selling soundtrack in history. The film was nominated for one Academy Award for Best Original Song. A sequel, Grease 2, was released in 1982, featuring few cast members reprising their roles.

Grease Movie Poster (1978)

Grease (1978)

Directed by: Randal Kleiser
Starring: John Travolta, Olivia Newton-John, Stockard Channing, Jeff Conaway, Barry Pearl, Michael Tucci, Kelly Ward, Dinah Manoff, Eve Arden, Frankie Avalon
Screenplay by: Bronte Woodard
Production Design by: Philip M. Jefferies
Cinematography by: Bill Butler
Film Editing by: John F. Burnett
Costume Design by: Albert Wolsky
Set Decoration by: James L. Berkey
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: June 16, 1978

Deep End (1971)

Deep End (1971)

Taglines: If you can’t have the real thing– you do all kinds of unreal things.

Mike (John Moulder Brown), a 15-year-old dropout, finds a job in a public bath. There he is trained by his co-worker Susan (Jane Asher), a girl ten years his senior. Susan is a tease who plays with Mike’s and other men’s feelings, acting sometimes warm and affectionate and other times cold and distant.

Working in the bathhouse turns out to involve providing services to clients of a more or less sexual nature, in exchange for a tip. For example, an older woman (Diana Dors) is sexually stimulated by pushing Mike’s head into her bosom and talking suggestively about football. Mike is confused by this and at first does not want to accept the tip he gets, but Susan tells him that these services are a normal practice, including exchange of her female clients for his male clients whenever a client prefers the opposite sex.

Mike fantasizes about Susan and falls in love with her, even though she has a wealthy and handsome young fiancé, Chris (Chris Sandford). Mike also discovers that Susan is cheating on her fiancé with an older, married man (Karl Michael Vogler) who was Mike’s physical education teacher and works at the baths as a swimming instructor for teenage girls, touching them inappropriately. Mike begins following Susan on her dates with Chris and the instructor and trying to disrupt them.

Deep End (1971)

Although Susan often gets angry at Mike for this, she provides just enough encouragement to cause him to continue the behavior. Mike’s infatuation with Susan continues despite his friends mocking him, his mother being treated rudely by Susan, his bicycle being destroyed by Susan, and his activities drawing the ire of Susan’s boyfriends, local police, and Mike’s boss at work. Obsessed with Susan, Mike refuses other outlets for sex, such as his former girlfriend and a prostitute who offers him a discount.

While following Susan on a date, Mike sees and steals a life-size advertising photo cutout of a naked girl who resembles Susan. He confronts Susan with it on the London Underground, flying into a violent tantrum in front of other passengers when Susan teasingly refuses to tell him whether she posed for the nude photo. Mike then takes the cutout to the deserted baths after hours and swims naked with it, embracing it.

The next morning, Mike disrupts the instructor’s foot race and punctures the tyres of the instructor’s car while Susan is driving it. Susan gets mad and hits Mike, in the process losing the diamond from her new engagement ring in the snow. Anxious to find the lost diamond, Mike and Susan collect the surrounding snow in plastic bags and take it back to the closed baths to melt it, using a lowered ceiling lamp outlet to heat an electric kettle in the empty pool.

While Susan is briefly out of the room, Mike finds the diamond in the melted snow, and lies down naked in the dry pool with the diamond on his tongue. He teases Susan by refusing to give her the diamond until she undresses. She does so, he gives her the diamond and she is about to leave, but she reconsiders and lies down next to him. They have a sexual encounter, although it is not clear whether Mike is able to perform.

Deep End is a 1970 British-West German drama film directed by Jerzy Skolimowski and starring Jane Asher and John Moulder Brown. Set in London, the film focuses on the relationship between two young co-workers at a suburban bath house and swimming pool.

In 2009, Bavaria Media, a subsidiary of Bavaria Film, which co-produced the film in 1970 through its subsidiary Maran Film, began a digital restoration as part of the film’s 40th anniversary, in cooperation with the British Film Institute. The restored film was re-released in UK cinemas on 6 May 2011 and was released on Blu-ray Disc and DVD on 18 July 2011 in BFI’s BFI Flipside series.[2] In March 2012 it was first shown on TV by Film4.

Deep End Movie Poster (1971)

Deep End (1971)

Directed by: Jerzy Skolimowski
Starring: Jane Asher, John Moulder-Brown, Karl Michael Vogler, Christopher Sandford, Diana Dors, Louise Martini, Erica Beer, Anita Lochner, Anne-Marie Kuster, Cheryl Hall
Screenplay by: Jerzy Skolimowski, Jerzy Gruza
Cinematography by: Charly Steinberger
Film Editing by: Barrie Vince
Costume Design by: Ursula Sensburg
Art Direction by: Max Ott Jr., Anthony Pratt
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: September 1, 1971

The Panic in Needle Park (1971)

The Panic in Needle Park (1971)

Taglines: God help Bobby and Helen. They’re in love in Needle Park.

This movie is a stark portrayal of life among a group of heroin addicts who hang out in “Needle Park” in New York City. Played against this setting is a low-key love story between Bobby, a young addict and small-time hustler, and Helen, a homeless girl who finds in her relationship with Bobby the stability she craves. She becomes addicted too, and life goes downhill for them both as their addiction deepens, eventually leading to a series of betrayals. But, in spite of it all, the relationship between Bobby and Helen endures.

The Panic in Needle Park is a 1971 American romantic drama film directed by Jerry Schatzberg and starring Al Pacino in his second film appearance.[2] The screenplay was written by Joan Didion and John Gregory Dunne, adapted from the 1966 novel by James Mills.

The film portrays life among a group of heroin addicts who hang out in “Needle Park” (then-nickname of Sherman Square on Manhattan’s Upper West Side near 72nd Street and Broadway).[3] The film is a love story between Bobby (Pacino), a young addict and small-time hustler, and Helen (Kitty Winn), a restless woman who finds Bobby charismatic. She becomes an addict, and life goes downhill for them both as their addictions worsen, eventually leading to a series of betrayals.

About the Story

In New York City, Helen returns to the apartment she shares with her boyfriend, Marco, after enduring an unhygienic and inept abortion. Helen becomes ill and Bobby, an amiable small-time drug dealer to whom Marco owes money, shows unexpected gentleness and concern for Helen. Helen considers returning to her dysfunctional family, but moves in with Bobby, and when she finds him taking drugs, he explains that he is not an addict, but only uses a little.

At Sherman Square, nicknamed Needle Park for the drug addicts who use it as a hangout to get drugs and get high. At the park, Bobby introduces Helen to various acquaintances, including his brother Hank, who burgles for a living. Helen witnesses the intricate ritual of addicts shooting up heroin.

Bobby and Helen are eventually evicted from their apartment and move into a sleazier one. After Bobby asks her to deliver money to one of his dealers, Helen is arrested and one of the officers, Detective Hotch, explains to Helen about what it’s like when there is a panic in Needle Park. A panic is when the drug supply on the street is low and addicts begin to turn each other into the police in return for favors. Unexpectedly, the officer releases Helen, who returns to Bobby, who begins to use drugs more heavily, and Helen begins to shoot up, too.

Bobby soon realizes Helen is using, and he proposes to her, something that prompts Hank to ask. The proposal prompts Hank to ask what they will live on and offers Bobby work as a burglar, to which Helen objects and insists that she will get a job. However, Helen quickly quits her new waitress job, and just before Bobby is to assist Hank in a burglary, he overdoses. Hank is angry with Bobby for jeopardizing his plans, but he allows Bobby to assist him on another night, during which Bobby is arrested. While he is in jail, Helen finds it harder to get drugs and has sex with Hank for heroin. When Bobby is released, he and Helen have a big fight.

The Panic in Needle Park Movie Poster (1971)

The Panic in Needle Park (1971)

Directed by: Jerry Schatzberg
Starring: Al Pacino, Kitty Winn, Alan Vint, Richard Bright, Kiel Martin, Michael McClanathan, Warren Finnerty, Marcia Jean Kurtz, Rutanya Alda
Screenplay by: Joan Didion
Cinematography by: Adam Holender
Film Editing by: Evan A. Lottman
Costume Design by: Jo Ynocencio
Set Decoration by: Philip Smith
Art Direction by: Murray P. Stern
Distributed by: 20th Century Fox
Release Date: July 13, 1971

The Way We Were (1973)

The Way We Were (1973)

Taglines: Everything seemed so important then .. even love!

The often unlikely joint lives of Katie Morosky and Hubbell Gardiner from the late 1930s to the late 1950s is presented, over which time, they are, in no particular order, strangers, acquaintances, friends, best friends, lovers and adversaries.

The unlikely nature of their relationship is due to their fundamental differences, where she is Jewish and passionate about her political activism both in political freedoms and Marxism to an extreme where she takes life a little too seriously, while he is the golden boy WASP, being afforded the privileges in life because of his background but who on the most part is able to capitalize on those privileges.

Their lives are shown in four general time periods, in chronological order when they attend the same college, their time in New York City during WWII, his life as a Hollywood screenwriter post-war, and his life as a writer for a New York based live television show.

The Way We Were is a 1973 American romantic drama film starring Barbra Streisand and Robert Redford, and directed by Sydney Pollack. The screenplay by Arthur Laurents was based on his college days at Cornell University and his experiences with the House Un-American Activities Committee.

A box office success, the film was nominated for several awards and won the Academy Award for Best Original Dramatic Score and Best Original Song for the theme song, “The Way We Were”,it ranked at number 6 on AFI’s 100 Years…100 Passions survey of the top 100 greatest love stories in American cinema. The Way We Were is considered one of the greatest romantic movies ever.

The soundtrack recording became a gold record and hit the Top 20 the Billboard 200 while the single became a million-selling gold single, topping the Billboard Hot 100 respectively, selling more than two million copies. Billboard named “The Way We Were” as the number 1 pop hit of 1974.

In 1998, the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame and finished at number 8 on AFI’s 100 Years…100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema in 2004. It was also included in the list of Songs of the Century, by the Recording Industry Association of America and the National Endowment for the Arts.

The Way We Were Movie Poster (1973)

The Way We Were (1973)

Directed by: Sydney Pollack
Starring: Barbra Streisand, Robert Redford, Bradford Dillman, Lois Chiles, Patrick O’Neal, Viveca Lindfors, Allyn Ann McLerie, Marcia Mae Jones
Screenplay by: Arthur Laurents
Production Design by: Stephen B. Grimes
Cinematography by: Harry Stradling Jr.
Film Editing by: John F. Burnett
Costume Design by: Dorothy Jeakins, Moss Mabry
Set Decoration by: William Kiernan
Music by: Marvin Hamlisch
Distributed by: Columbia Pictures
Release Date: October 19, 1973

Interiors (1978)

Interiors (1978)

Homage to Ingmar Bergman in this family drama involving a fashionable Long Island interior designer who tries to impose her overbearing, critical standards on her husband and her three grown daughters. The film is a realistic look at the relationships among one artistically-oriented family; one daughter is a successful writer; the second is looking for an artistic outlet; and the third is an actress. The mother has been deserted by her husband, their father. She thinks and hopes they may reconcile, but she soon learns that he has other thoughts that circle about a new acquaintance, a woman who has had two husbands and is still lively.

Interiors is a 1978 drama film written and directed by Woody Allen. Featured performers are Kristin Griffith, Mary Beth Hurt, Richard Jordan, Diane Keaton, E. G. Marshall, Geraldine Page, Maureen Stapleton and Sam Waterston.

Page received a BAFTA Film Award for Best Supporting Actress and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress. The film received four other Oscar nominations, two for Allen’s screenplay and direction, one for Stapleton as Best Actress in a Supporting Role and another for Mel Bourne and Daniel Robert for their art direction and set decoration. It is Allen’s first full-fledged film in the drama genre.

About the Story

The film centers around the three children of Arthur (E. G. Marshall), a corporate attorney, and Eve (Geraldine Page), an interior decorator. Renata (Diane Keaton) is a poet whose husband Frederick, a struggling writer, feels eclipsed by her success. Flyn (Kristin Griffith) is a vain actress who is away most of the time filming; the low quality of her films is an object of ridicule behind her back. Joey (Mary Beth Hurt), who is in a relationship with Mike (Sam Waterston), cannot settle on a career, and resents her mother for favoring Renata, while Renata resents their father’s concern over Joey’s lack of direction.

One morning, Arthur unexpectedly announces that he wants a separation from his wife and would like to live alone. Eve, who is clinically depressed and mentally unstable, attempts suicide. The shock of these two events causes a rift between the sisters. Arthur returns from a trip to Greece with Pearl (Maureen Stapleton), a high-spirited and more “normal” woman, whom he intends to marry. His daughters are disturbed that Arthur would disregard Eve’s suicide attempt and find another woman, whom Joey refers to as a “vulgarian”.

Interiors Movie Poster (1978)

Interiors (1978)

Directed by: Woody Allen
Starring: Diane Keaton, Geraldine Page, Kristin Griffith, Mary Beth Hurt, Richard Jordan, Sam Waterston, Missy Hope, Kerry Duffy
Screenplay by: Woody Allen
Production Design by: Mel Bourne
Cinematography by: Gordon Willis
Film Editing by: Ralph Rosenblum
Costume Design by: Joel Schumacher
Set Decoration by: Mario Mazzola, Daniel Robert
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: August 2, 1978