The Conformist (1970)

The Conformist (1970)

The film opens with Marcello Clerici (Jean-Louis Trintignant) in Paris finalizing preparations to assassinate his former college professor, Luca Quadri (Enzo Tarascio). It frequently returns to the interior of a car driven by Manganiello (Gastone Moschin) as the two of them pursue the professor and his wife.

Through a series of flashbacks, we see him discussing with Italo, a blind friend, his plans to marry, his somewhat awkward attempts to join the Fascist secret police, and his visits to his morphine-addicted mother at the family’s decaying villa and his unhinged father at an insane asylum.

In one of these flashbacks we see him as a boy during World War I, who finds himself isolated from society by his family’s wealth. He is socially humiliated by his schoolmates until he is rescued by chauffeur Lino (Pierre Clémenti). Lino offers to show him a pistol and then makes sexual advances towards Marcello, which he partially responds to before grabbing the pistol and shooting wildly into the walls and into Lino, then flees from the scene of what he assumes is a murder.

In another flashback Marcello and his fiancee Giulia discuss the necessity of his going to confession in order for her parents to allow them to marry, even though he is an atheist. He agrees, and in confession admits to the priest to having committed many sins, including his homosexual experience with Lino, the consequent murder, premarital sex, and his absence of guilt for these sins. Marcello admits he thinks little of his new wife but craves the normality that a traditional marriage with children will bring. The priest is shocked — apparently more by Marcello’s homosexuality than the murder — but quickly absolves Marcello once he hears that he is currently working for the Fascist secret police, called Organization for Vigilance and Repression of Anti-Fascism (OVRA).

The Conformist (Italian: Il conformista) is a 1970 political drama film directed by Bernardo Bertolucci. The screenplay was written by Bertolucci based on the 1951 novel The Conformist by Alberto Moravia. The film stars Jean-Louis Trintignant and Stefania Sandrelli, and features Gastone Moschin, Enzo Tarascio, Fosco Giachetti, José Quaglio, Dominique Sanda and Pierre Clémenti. The film was a co-production of Italian, French, and West German film companies.

Bertolucci makes use of the 1930s art and decor associated with the Fascist era: the middle-class drawing rooms and the huge halls of the ruling elite.

The Conformist (1970) Movie Poster

The Conformist (1970)

Directed by: Bernardo Bertolucci
Starring: Jean-Louis Trintignant, Stefania Sandrelli, Gastone Moschin, Enzo Tarascio, Fosco Giachetti, Dominique Sanda
Screenplay by: Bernardo Bertolucci
Production Design by: Ferdinando Scarfiotti
Cinematography by: Vittorio Storaro
Film Editing by: Franco Arcalli
Costume Design by: Gitt Magrini
Set Decoration by: Osvaldo Desideri
Music by: Georges Delerue
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: October 22, 1970

Days of Heaven

Days of Heaven (1978)

Taglines: You’ve got to go through Hell before you get to Heaven.

Jill and Abby, a young couple who to the outside world pretend to be brother and sister are living and working in Chicago at the beginning of the century. They want to escape the poverty and hard labor of the city and travel south. Together with the girl Linda (who acts as the narrator in the movie) they find employment on a farm in the Texas panhandle.

When the harvest is over the young, rich and handsome farmer invites them to stay because he has fallen in love with Abby. When Bill and Abby discover that the farmer is seriously ill and has only got a year left to live they decide that Abby will accept his wedding proposal in order to make some benefit out of the situation. When the expected death fails to come, jealousy and impatience are slowly setting in and accidents become eventually inevitable.

Days of Heaven is a 1978 American drama film written and directed by Terrence Malick and starring Richard Gere, Brooke Adams, Sam Shepard, and Linda Manz. Set in 1916, it tells the story of Bill and Abby, lovers who travel to the Texas Panhandle to harvest crops for a wealthy farmer. Bill encourages Abby to claim the fortune of the dying farmer by tricking him into a false marriage.

Days of Heaven was Malick’s second feature film, after the enthusiastically received Badlands (1973), and was produced on a budget of $3,000,000. Production was particularly troublesome, with a tight shooting schedule and significant budget restraints. Additionally, editing took Malick a lengthy three years, due to difficulty with achieving a general flow and assembly of the scenes. This was eventually solved with an added, improvised narration by Linda Manz.[3] The film was scored by Ennio Morricone and photographed by Nestor Almendros and Haskell Wexler.

Days of Heaven (1978) Movie Poster

Days of Heaven (1978)

Directed by: Terrence Malick
Starring: Richard Gere, Brooke Adams, Sam Shepard, Linda Manz, Robert J. Wilke, Jackie Shultis, Stuart Margolin, Timothy Scott
Screenplay by: Terrence Malick
Cinematography by: Néstor Almendros
Film Editing by: Billy Weber
Costume Design by: Patricia Norris, Jerry R. Allen
Set Decoration by: Robert Gould
Art Direction by: Jack Fisk
Music by: Ennio Morricone
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Nelease Date: September 13, 1978

Murder on the Orient Express (1974)

Murder on the Orient Express (1974)

Taglines: The greatest cast of suspicious characters ever involved in murder.

The film features the Belgian detective Hercule Poirot. Albert Finney stars as Poirot, who is asked by his friend Bianchi (Martin Balsam), a train company director, to investigate the murder of an American business tycoon, Mr. Samuel Ratchett (Richard Widmark), when all are aboard the Orient Express train.

The suspects are portrayed by an all-star cast, including Lauren Bacall, Ingrid Bergman (delivering an Oscar-winning performance), Sean Connery, John Gielgud, Vanessa Redgrave, Michael York, Jacqueline Bisset and Anthony Perkins. The screenplay is by Paul Dehn as well as an uncredited Anthony Shaffer.

Richard Rodney Bennett’s Orient Express theme has been reworked into an orchestral suite and performed and recorded several times. It was performed on the original soundtrack album by the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden under Marcus Dods. The piano soloist was the composer himself.

Murder on the Orient Express is a 1974 British mystery film in Panavision directed by Sidney Lumet, starring Albert Finney as Hercule Poirot, and based on the 1934 novel Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie.

Murder on the Orient Express Movie Poster (1974)

Murder on the Orient Express (1974)

Directed by: Sidney Lumet
Starring: Albert Finney, Lauren Bacall, Ingrid Bergman, Martin Balsam, Jacqueline Bisset, Jean-Pierre Cassel, Sean Connery, Wendy Hiller, Anthony Perkins, Vanessa Redgrave
Screenplay by: Paul Dehn
Production Design by: Tony Walton
Cinematography by: Geoffrey Unsworth
Film Editing by: Anne V. Coates
Costume Design by: Tony Walton
Art Direction by: Jack Stephens
Music by: Richard Rodney Bennett
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: November 24, 1974

Grease (1978)

Grease (1978)

Taglines: Grease is the word.

In the summer of 1958, Sandy Olsson (Newton-John) meets local boy Danny Zuko (Travolta) at the beach while on vacation and they soon fall in love. As the summer comes to an end, Sandy worries about returning home to Australia and never seeing Danny again, but he assures her that it is only the beginning for them.

On the first day of their senior year at Rydell High, Danny, the leader of a greaser gang known as the T-Birds, meets with his fellow T-Birds, Kenickie (Jeff Conaway) (second-in-command and Danny’s best friend), Sonny (Michael Tucci), Doody (Barry Pearl), and Putzie (Kelly Ward), and they all catch up on what they did over the summer. Danny briefly mentions that he met a girl and they joke around with it.

Sandy, meanwhile, enrolls at Rydell after an apparent change in her plans but is unaware of Danny’s presence, as is he of hers. Sandy has made friends with Frenchy (Didi Conn), a member of the Pink Ladies, an associated female equivalent of the T-Birds. Frenchie introduces Sandy to fellow Pink Ladies Rizzo (Stockard Channing), the group’s leader, Jan (Jamie Donnelly), and Marty (Dinah Manoff). Rizzo notes she looks “too pure to be Pink.”

Grease (1978)

At lunch, Sandy tells them about meeting an amazing boy over the summer and falling in love (“Summer Nights”). After Rizzo discovers she is speaking of Danny, her ex-boyfriend, she deviously arranges a surprise meeting at a pep rally. Despite his excitement at seeing her, Danny acts indifferently in an effort to protect his cool reputation, causing Sandy to run off in disgust. Frenchy invites Sandy over to her house to join the rest of the girls for a slumber party that night to cheer her up

At the party, Rizzo mocks Sandy (“Look at Me, I’m Sandra Dee”) and the other girls join in, until Sandy overhears and goes outside to be alone where she laments missing Danny (“Hopelessly Devoted to You”). The T-Birds crash the party and Rizzo ends up driving off alone with Kenickie. Later, their makeout session is interrupted by Leo (Dennis C. Stewart), the leader of the Scorpions, a rival greaser gang from another high school. Leo rear-ends Kenickie’s car, insults them, and drives away.

After the T-Birds help repair Kenickie’s car (“Greased Lightnin'”) in autoshop class, Danny asks Coach Calhoun (Sid Caesar) to help him find a sport so he can impress Sandy, who has begun dating Tom (Lorenzo Lamas), one of the school’s football players. After trying various sports, Danny eventually discovers an aptitude for track and rekindles his relationship with Sandy.

They attempt a date at the Frosty Palace, a local malt shop hangout, but their date is crashed by both the Pink Ladies and the T-Birds, who are gradually pairing off. Kenickie and Rizzo have an argument and the two groups depart, leaving Frenchy alone to ponder the wisdom of dropping out of high school to attend beauty school after a mistake in hair dyeing class turned her hair bubblegum pink. She is then visited by her guardian angel (Frankie Avalon), who urges her to return to high school (“Beauty School Dropout”).

A few weeks later, the school dance arrives. Rydell High had been picked for a live national TV broadcast on National Bandstand, hosted by DJ Vince Fontaine (Edd Byrnes) (a fictional version of Alan Freed), who flirts with Marty throughout the night. Rizzo and Kenickie attempt to score off each other by bringing Leo and his on-and-off girlfriend Cha Cha (Annette Charles), who was with Leo when he interrupted their makeout session, respectively as their dates, while Danny and Sandy go together. During the final dance, Danny and Cha Cha (who were also once boyfriend and girlfriend) perform together and win the national dance-off (“Born to Hand Jive”), which hurts Sandy’s feelings. She leaves alone.

Grease is a 1978 American musical romantic comedy film directed by Randal Kleiser and produced by Paramount Pictures. The film is an adaptation of Warren Casey and Jim Jacobs’ 1971 musical of the same name about two lovers in a 1950s high school. The film stars John Travolta, Olivia Newton-John, Stockard Channing and Jeff Conaway.

Released on June 16, 1978, the film was successful both critically and financially at the box office, becoming the highest grossing film of the year. As of 2016, the film remains the highest-grossing movie musical in the United States. Its soundtrack album ended 1978 as the second-best selling album of the year in the U.S., behind the soundtrack of Saturday Night Fever, another film starring Travolta. The soundtrack is also the top-selling soundtrack in history. The film was nominated for one Academy Award for Best Original Song. A sequel, Grease 2, was released in 1982, featuring few cast members reprising their roles.

Grease Movie Poster (1978)

Grease (1978)

Directed by: Randal Kleiser
Starring: John Travolta, Olivia Newton-John, Stockard Channing, Jeff Conaway, Barry Pearl, Michael Tucci, Kelly Ward, Dinah Manoff, Eve Arden, Frankie Avalon
Screenplay by: Bronte Woodard
Production Design by: Philip M. Jefferies
Cinematography by: Bill Butler
Film Editing by: John F. Burnett
Costume Design by: Albert Wolsky
Set Decoration by: James L. Berkey
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: June 16, 1978

Deep End (1971)

Deep End (1971)

Taglines: If you can’t have the real thing– you do all kinds of unreal things.

Mike (John Moulder Brown), a 15-year-old dropout, finds a job in a public bath. There he is trained by his co-worker Susan (Jane Asher), a girl ten years his senior. Susan is a tease who plays with Mike’s and other men’s feelings, acting sometimes warm and affectionate and other times cold and distant.

Working in the bathhouse turns out to involve providing services to clients of a more or less sexual nature, in exchange for a tip. For example, an older woman (Diana Dors) is sexually stimulated by pushing Mike’s head into her bosom and talking suggestively about football. Mike is confused by this and at first does not want to accept the tip he gets, but Susan tells him that these services are a normal practice, including exchange of her female clients for his male clients whenever a client prefers the opposite sex.

Mike fantasizes about Susan and falls in love with her, even though she has a wealthy and handsome young fiancé, Chris (Chris Sandford). Mike also discovers that Susan is cheating on her fiancé with an older, married man (Karl Michael Vogler) who was Mike’s physical education teacher and works at the baths as a swimming instructor for teenage girls, touching them inappropriately. Mike begins following Susan on her dates with Chris and the instructor and trying to disrupt them.

Deep End (1971)

Although Susan often gets angry at Mike for this, she provides just enough encouragement to cause him to continue the behavior. Mike’s infatuation with Susan continues despite his friends mocking him, his mother being treated rudely by Susan, his bicycle being destroyed by Susan, and his activities drawing the ire of Susan’s boyfriends, local police, and Mike’s boss at work. Obsessed with Susan, Mike refuses other outlets for sex, such as his former girlfriend and a prostitute who offers him a discount.

While following Susan on a date, Mike sees and steals a life-size advertising photo cutout of a naked girl who resembles Susan. He confronts Susan with it on the London Underground, flying into a violent tantrum in front of other passengers when Susan teasingly refuses to tell him whether she posed for the nude photo. Mike then takes the cutout to the deserted baths after hours and swims naked with it, embracing it.

The next morning, Mike disrupts the instructor’s foot race and punctures the tyres of the instructor’s car while Susan is driving it. Susan gets mad and hits Mike, in the process losing the diamond from her new engagement ring in the snow. Anxious to find the lost diamond, Mike and Susan collect the surrounding snow in plastic bags and take it back to the closed baths to melt it, using a lowered ceiling lamp outlet to heat an electric kettle in the empty pool.

While Susan is briefly out of the room, Mike finds the diamond in the melted snow, and lies down naked in the dry pool with the diamond on his tongue. He teases Susan by refusing to give her the diamond until she undresses. She does so, he gives her the diamond and she is about to leave, but she reconsiders and lies down next to him. They have a sexual encounter, although it is not clear whether Mike is able to perform.

Deep End is a 1970 British-West German drama film directed by Jerzy Skolimowski and starring Jane Asher and John Moulder Brown. Set in London, the film focuses on the relationship between two young co-workers at a suburban bath house and swimming pool.

In 2009, Bavaria Media, a subsidiary of Bavaria Film, which co-produced the film in 1970 through its subsidiary Maran Film, began a digital restoration as part of the film’s 40th anniversary, in cooperation with the British Film Institute. The restored film was re-released in UK cinemas on 6 May 2011 and was released on Blu-ray Disc and DVD on 18 July 2011 in BFI’s BFI Flipside series.[2] In March 2012 it was first shown on TV by Film4.

Deep End Movie Poster (1971)

Deep End (1971)

Directed by: Jerzy Skolimowski
Starring: Jane Asher, John Moulder-Brown, Karl Michael Vogler, Christopher Sandford, Diana Dors, Louise Martini, Erica Beer, Anita Lochner, Anne-Marie Kuster, Cheryl Hall
Screenplay by: Jerzy Skolimowski, Jerzy Gruza
Cinematography by: Charly Steinberger
Film Editing by: Barrie Vince
Costume Design by: Ursula Sensburg
Art Direction by: Max Ott Jr., Anthony Pratt
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: September 1, 1971

Nashville (1975)

Nashville (1975)

Taglines: The damnedest thing you ever saw.

This movie tells the intersecting stories of various people connected to the music business in Nashville. Barbara Jean is the reigning queen of Nashville but is near collapse. Linnea and Delbert Reese have a shaky marriage and 2 deaf children. Opal is a British journalist touring the area. These and other stories come together in a dramatic climax.

Nashville is a 1975 American satirical musical comedy-drama film directed by Robert Altman. A winner of numerous awards and selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry, Nashville is generally considered to be one of Altman’s best films.

The film takes a snapshot of people involved in the country music and gospel music businesses in Nashville, Tennessee. It has 24 main characters, an hour of musical numbers, and multiple storylines. The characters’ efforts to succeed or hold on to their success are interwoven with the efforts of a political operative and a local businessman to stage a concert rally before the state’s presidential primary for a populist outsider running for President of the United States on the Replacement Party ticket. In the film’s final half-hour, most of the characters come together at the outdoor concert at the Parthenon in Nashville.

The large ensemble cast includes David Arkin, Barbara Baxley, Ned Beatty, Karen Black, Ronee Blakley, Timothy Brown, Keith Carradine, Geraldine Chaplin, Robert DoQui, Shelley Duvall, Allen Garfield, Henry Gibson, Scott Glenn, Jeff Goldblum, Barbara Harris, David Hayward, Michael Murphy, Allan F. Nicholls, Dave Peel, Cristina Raines, Bert Remsen, Lily Tomlin, Gwen Welles, and Keenan Wynn.

Nashville Movie Poster (1975)

Nashville (1975)

Directed by: Robert Altman
Starring: Ned Beatty, Ronee Blakley, Keith Carradine, Geraldine Chaplin, Henry Gibson, Michael Murphy, Lily Tomlin, Barbara Harris
Screenplay by: Joan Tewkesbury
Cinematography by: Paul Lohmann
Film Editing by: Dennis M. Hill, Sidney Levin
Set Decoration by: Robert M. Anderson
Music by: Arlene Barnett, Jonnie Barnett, Karen Black, Ronee Blakley, Gary Busey, Juan Grizzle, Allan F. Nicholls, Dave Peel, Joe Raposo
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: June 11, 1975

Borsalino (1970)

Borsalino (1970)

In year 1930, in Marseilles, the gangster Siffredi is released from prison and searches for his former girl friend, Lola. He finds her with Capella, another gangster. The two men fight over her but become friendly and form a partnership.

Capella and Siffredi fix horseraces and prizefights, then are contacted by Rinaldi, a lawyer who works for Marello and Poli, the gangsters who control crime in Marseilles. Rinaldi suggests that Siffredi and Capella seize control of Marello’s hold on the fish market business. They succeed in doing this but become ambitious and try to control Poli’s meat market operations. Poli tries to have them killed but they succeed in killing him.

Another gangster, The Dancer, kills Rinaldi. Capella and Siffredi dispose of his body and establish themselves as the rulers of the Marseilles crime world. Capella decides to leave Marseilles but is killed by an assassin. Siffredi then decides to leave Marseilles himself.

Borsalino (1970)

Borsalino is a 1970 gangster film directed by Jacques Deray and starring Alain Delon, Jean-Paul Belmondo and Catherine Rouvel. It was entered into the 20th Berlin International Film Festival.

In 2009 Empire Magazine named it #19 in a poll of the 20 Greatest Gangster Movies You’ve Never Seen* (*Probably) A sequel, Borsalino & Co., was released in 1974 with Alain Delon in the leading role.

Borsalino Movie Poster (1970)

Borsalino (1970)

Directed by: Jacques Deray
Starring: Jean-Paul Belmondo, Alain Delon, Catherine Rouvel, Françoise Christophe, Corinne Marchand, Laura Adani, Nicole Calfan, Hélène Rémy, Odette Piquet
Screenplay by: Jean-Claude Carrière, Jean Cau
Cinematography by: Jean-Jacques Tarbès
Film Editing by: Paul Cayatte
Costume Design by: Jacques Fonteray
Set Decoration by: Robert Christidès
Art Direction by: François de Lamothe
Music by. Claude Bolling
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: May 25, 1970

Paper Moon (1973)

Paper Moon (1973)

Taglines: There’s a sucker born every minute.

Adapted from the novel, “Addie Pray” (1971) by Joe David Brown, Paper Moon is the story of Moses Pray and Addie Loggins. With scenery reminiscent of “The Grapes of Wrath,” the film is set in the depression-era Midwestern region of the United States. As the movie opens, we see a small group of mourners clustered at a graveside.

Among the mourners is Addie, the dead woman’s small daughter. Moses Pray — ostensibly of the “Kansas Bible Company” — approaches the group, as the service concludes, and two of the elderly women remark that the child bears some resemblance to him and asks if he might be related. “If ever a child needed kin, it’s now,” one lady says.

With no knowledge of who her father is, Addie’s only haven is her Aunt’s home in St. Joseph, Missouri. Having identified himself as a “traveling man spreading the Lord’s gospel in these troubled times,” “Mose” is prevailed upon to deliver the helpless child to her Aunt since he’s going that way, anyway.

Paper Moon is a 1973 American comedy-drama film directed by Peter Bogdanovich and released by Paramount Pictures. Screenwriter Alvin Sargent adapted the script from the novel Addie Pray by Joe David Brown. The film, shot in black-and-white, is set in Kansas and Missouri during the Great Depression. It stars the real-life father and daughter pairing of Ryan and Tatum O’Neal as protagonists Moze and Addie.

Paper Moon Movie Poster (1973)

Paper Moon (1973)

Directed by: Peter Bogdanovich
Starring: Ryan O’Neal, Tatum O’Neal, Madeline Kahn, John Hillerman, Jessie Lee Fulton, James N. Harrell, Lila Waters, Yvonne Harrison
Screenplay by: Alvin Sargent
Production Design by: Polly Platt
Cinematography by: László Kovács
Film Editing by: Verna Fields
Costume Design by: Polly Platt
Set Decoration by: John P. Austin
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: May 9, 1973

Lady Sings the Blues (1972)

Lady Sings the Blues (1972)

Born Elinore Harris, Billie Holiday had a difficult teen and young adulthood period, which included working in brothels, both as a cleaning woman and a prostitute, and being raped. Through this difficulty, she dreamed of becoming a jazz singer. She got her initial singing break when she applied at a Harlem club that was looking for a dancer, but where she got hired as a singer. There, she met and fell in love with the suave Louis McKay.

After this initial break, Billie wanted her singing career to move to the mainstream clubs in downtown Manhattan. She took a risk when she agreed to be the lead singer for the Reg Hanley Band, a primarily white group, who convinced her that she would have to make her mark in regional tours before her Manhattan dream could happen. As Billie tried to advance her career, pressures of life, including being a black woman, led to her not so secret substance abuse (especially of heroin), not so secret because of her increasingly erratic behavior

Lady Sings the Blues is a 1972 American biographical drama film directed by Sidney J. Furie about jazz singer Billie Holiday, loosely based on her 1956 autobiography which, in turn, took its title from one of Holiday’s most popular songs. It was produced by Motown Productions for Paramount Pictures. Diana Ross portrayed Holiday, alongside a cast including Billy Dee Williams, Richard Pryor, James T. Callahan, and Scatman Crothers.

In 1936, New York City, Billie Holiday is arrested on a drugs charge. In a flashback to 1928, Billie is working as a housekeeper in a brothel in Baltimore where she is raped. She runs away to her mother, who sets up a job cleaning for another brothel in the Harlem section of New York. The brothel is run by an arrogant, selfish owner who pays Billie very little money.

Eventually, Billie tires of scrubbing floors and becomes a prostitute, but later quits and returns to a nightclub to unsuccessfully audition to become a showgirl. After “Piano Man” (Richard Pryor) accompanies Billie “All of Me”, Jerry, the club owner, books her as a singer in the show.

Billie’s debut begins unsuccessfully until Louis McKay (Billy Dee Williams), arrives and gives her a fifty dollar tip. Billie takes the money and sings “Them There Eyes”. Billie takes a liking to Louis and begins a relationship with him. Eventually she is discovered by two men: Harry and Reg Hanley, who sign her as a soloist for their southern tour in hopes of landing a radio network gig. During the tour, Billie witnesses the aftermath of the lynching of an African-American man, which presses her to record the controversial song “Strange Fruit”.

The harsh experiences on the tour result in Billie taking drugs which Harry supplies. One night when Billie is performing, Louis comes to see Billie. She collapses on stage. In her dressing room, Louis notices her needle marks, knows that she is doing drugs, and tells her she is going home with him. Billie promises to stay off the drugs if Louis stays with her.

In New York, Reg and Louis arrange Billie’s radio debut, but the station does not call her to sing; the radio sponsors, a soap company, object to her race. The group heads to Cafe Manhattan to drown their sorrows. Billie has too much to drink and asks Harry for drugs, saying that she does not want her family to know that the radio show upset her. He refuses and she throws her drink in his face.

She is ready to leave, but Louis has arranged for her to sing at the Cafe, a club where she once aspired to sing. She obliges with one song but refuses an encore, leaving the club in urgent need of a fix. Louis, suspicious that Billie has broken her promise, takes her back to his home but refuses to allow her access to the bathroom or her kit. She fights Louis for it, pulling a razor on him. Louis leaves her to shoot up, telling her he does not want her there when he returns.

Lady Sings the Blues Movie Poster (1972)

Lady Sings the Blues (1972)

Directed by: Sidney J. Furie
Starring: Diana Ross, Billy Dee Williams, Richard Pryor, James T. Callahan, Sid Melton, Isabel Sanford, Norman Bartold, Clay Tanner
Screenplay by: Chris Clark, Suzanne De Passe
Production Design by: Carl Anderson
inematography by: John A. Alonzo
Film Editing by: Argyle Nelson Jr.
Costume Design by: Ray Aghayan, Bob Mackie
Set Decoration by: Reg Allen
Music by: Michel Legrand
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: October 12, 1972

Serpico (1973)

Serpico (1973)

Serpico is a cop in the 1960s-early 1970s. Unlike all his colleagues, he refuses a share of the money that the cops routinely extort from local criminals. Nobody wants to work with Serpico, and he’s in constant danger of being placed in life threatening positions by his “partners”. Nothing seems to get done even when he goes to the highest of authorities. Despite the dangers he finds himself in, he still refuses to ‘go with the flow’, in the hope that one day, the truth will be known.

Serpico is a 1973 American neo-noir crime drama film directed by Sidney Lumet and starring Al Pacino. Waldo Salt and Norman Wexler wrote the screenplay, adapting Peter Maas’s biography of NYPD officer Frank Serpico, who went undercover to expose corruption in the police force. Both Maas’s book and the film cover 12 years, 1960 to 1972. The film and principals were nominated for numerous awards, earning recognition for its score, direction, screenplay, and Pacino’s performance. The film was also a commercial success.

About the Story

Working as a uniformed patrolman, Frank Serpico excels at every assignment. He moves on to plainclothes assignments, where he slowly discovers a hidden world of corruption and graft among his own colleagues. After witnessing cops commit violence, take payoffs, and other forms of police corruption, Serpico decides to expose what he has seen, but is harassed and threatened by his peers. His struggle leads to infighting within the police force, problems in his personal relationships, and his life being threatened.

Finally, after being shot in the face during a drug bust on February 3, 1971, he testifies before the Knapp Commission, a government inquiry into NYPD police corruption between 1970 and 1972. After receiving a New York City Police Department Medal of Honor and a disability pension, Serpico resigns from the force and moves to Switzerland.

Serpico Movie Poster (1973)

Serpico (1973)

Directed by: Sidney Lumet
Starring: Al Pacino, John Randolph, Jack Kehoe, Biff McGuire, Barbara Eda-Young, Cornelia Sharpe, Tony Roberts, John Medici, Albert Henderson
Screenplay by: Waldo Salt
Production Design by: Charles Bailey
Cinematography by: Arthur J. Ornitz
Film Editing by: Dede Allen, Richard Marks
Costume Design by: Anna Hill Johnstone
Set Decoration by: Thomas H. Wright
Art Direction by: Douglas Higgins
Music by: Mikis Theodorakis
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: December 5, 1973