Moonraker (1979)

Moonraker (1979)

Taglines: Outer space now belgngs to 007.

James Bond is back for another mission and this time, he is blasting off into space. A spaceship traveling through space is mysteriously hi-jacked and Bond must work quickly to find out who was behind it all. He starts with the rockets creators, Drax Industries and the man behind the organisation, Hugo Drax. On his journey he ends up meeting Dr. Holly Goodhead and encounters the metal-toothed Jaws once again.x

Moonraker (1979) is the eleventh spy film in the James Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. The third and final film in the series to be directed by Lewis Gilbert, it co-stars Lois Chiles, Michael Lonsdale, Corinne Cléry, and Richard Kiel. Bond investigates the theft of a space shuttle, leading him to Hugo Drax, the owner of the shuttle’s manufacturing firm. Along with space scientist Dr. Holly Goodhead, Bond follows the trail from California to Venice, Rio de Janeiro, and the Amazon rainforest, and finally into outer space to prevent a plot to wipe out the world population and to re-create humanity with a master race.

Moonraker (1979)

Moonraker was intended by its creator Ian Fleming to become a film even before he completed the novel in 1954, since he based it on a screenplay manuscript he had written even earlier. The film’s producers had originally intended to film For Your Eyes Only, but instead chose this title due to the rise of the science fiction genre in the wake of the Star Wars phenomenon. Budgetary issues caused the film to be primarily shot in France, with locations also in Italy, Brazil, Guatemala and the United States. The soundstages of Pinewood Studios in England, traditionally used for the series, were only used by the special effects team.

Moonraker was noted for its high production cost of $34 million, almost twice as much money as predecessor The Spy Who Loved Me, and it received mixed reviews. However, the film’s visuals were praised, Derek Meddings being nominated for the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects, and it eventually became the highest-grossing film of the series with $210,300,000 worldwide, a record that stood until 1995’s GoldenEye.

Moonraker (1979) Movie Poster

Moonraker (1979)

Directed by: Lewis Gilbert
Starring: Roger Moore, Lois Chiles, Michael Lonsdale, Richard Kiel, Corinne Cléry, Bernard Lee, Geoffrey Keen, Desmond Llewelyn, Lois Maxwell
Screenplay by: Christopher Wood
Production Design by: Ken Adam
Cinematography by: Jean Tournier
Film Editing by: John Glen
Costume Design by: Jacques Fonteray
Set Decoration by: Peter Howitt
Art Direction by: Charles Bishop, Max Douy
Music by: John Barry
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: June 26, 1979

Carrie (1976)

Carrie (1976)

Taglines: Take Carrie to the prom. I dare you!

It’s nearing the end of the school year. High school senior Carrie White is a social outcast, largely due to being unwise to the ways of the world based on her upbringing. Her mother, Margaret White, is a religious fanatic, her extreme views primarily targeted against sex, which she believes is a sin. She even believes natural associated processes such as menstruation are a sin, about which she has refused to mention to Carrie.

Mrs. White’s beliefs were taken to that extreme largely because of her own failed marriage and her husband Ralph long ago having run off with another woman. The only adult authority figure who tries to help Carrie with her life is her phys ed teacher, Miss Collins, who is nonetheless warned not to get too close to go against how Mrs. White chooses to raise Carrie, Mrs. White whose beliefs are well known in the community. An impromptu event that happens among Carrie’s phys ed classmates against her leads to her classmates being punished.

Carrie (1976)

Carrie is a 1976 American supernatural horror film[3] based on Stephen King’s 1974 epistolary novel of the same name. The film was directed by Brian De Palma and produced by Paul Monash, with a screenplay by Lawrence D. Cohen.

The film received two Academy Award nominations, one for Sissy Spacek in the title role and one for Piper Laurie as her abusive mother. The film featured numerous young actors – including Nancy Allen, William Katt, Amy Irving, and John Travolta – whose careers were launched, or escalated, by the film. It also relaunched the screen and television career of Laurie, who had not been active in show business since 1961. Carrie was the first of more than 100 film and television productions adapted from, or based on, the published works of Stephen King.

Carrie (1976) Movie Poster

Carrie (1976)

Directed by: Brian De Palma
Starring: Sissy Spacek, Piper Laurie, Amy Irving, William Katt, John Travolta, ancy Allen, Betty Buckley, Priscilla Pointer
Screenplay by: Lawrence D. Cohen
Cinematography by: Mario Tosi
Film Editing by: Paul Hirsch
Costume Design by: Rosanna Norton
Set Decoration by: Robert Gould
Music by: Pino Donaggio
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: November 3, 1976

The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976)

The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976)

Charles Dreyfus escapes from the mental asylum and tries to kill Chief Inspector Jacques Clouseau. He doesn’t succeed at first, so he takes on another strategy, namely to build a Doomsday machine and demand that someone else kills Jacques Clouseau, or Dreyfus will use the machine to wipe out whole cities and even whole countries… With about 22 assassins from all over the globe on his tail, Clouseau decides to find Dreyfus alone and put him back in the mental asylum.

The Pink Panther Strikes Again is the fifth film in The Pink Panther series and picks up where The Return of the Pink Panther leaves off. Released in 1976, Strikes Again is the third entry to include the words Pink Panther in its title, although the story does not involve the Pink Panther diamond. Unused footage from the film was later included in Trail of the Pink Panther.

The Pink Panther Strikes Again Movie Poster (1976)

The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976)

Directed by: Blake Edwards
Starring: Peter Sellers, Herbert Lom, Lesley-Anne Down, Burt Kwouk, Leonard Rossiter, André Maranne, Richard Vernon, Dudley Sutton
Screenplay by: Frank Waldman, Blake Edwards
Production Design by: Peter Mullins
Cinematography by: Harry Waxman
Film Editing by: Alan Jones
Art Direction by: John Siddall
Music by: Henry Mancini
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: December 15, 1976

Interiors (1978)

Interiors (1978)

Homage to Ingmar Bergman in this family drama involving a fashionable Long Island interior designer who tries to impose her overbearing, critical standards on her husband and her three grown daughters. The film is a realistic look at the relationships among one artistically-oriented family; one daughter is a successful writer; the second is looking for an artistic outlet; and the third is an actress. The mother has been deserted by her husband, their father. She thinks and hopes they may reconcile, but she soon learns that he has other thoughts that circle about a new acquaintance, a woman who has had two husbands and is still lively.

Interiors is a 1978 drama film written and directed by Woody Allen. Featured performers are Kristin Griffith, Mary Beth Hurt, Richard Jordan, Diane Keaton, E. G. Marshall, Geraldine Page, Maureen Stapleton and Sam Waterston.

Page received a BAFTA Film Award for Best Supporting Actress and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress. The film received four other Oscar nominations, two for Allen’s screenplay and direction, one for Stapleton as Best Actress in a Supporting Role and another for Mel Bourne and Daniel Robert for their art direction and set decoration. It is Allen’s first full-fledged film in the drama genre.

About the Story

The film centers around the three children of Arthur (E. G. Marshall), a corporate attorney, and Eve (Geraldine Page), an interior decorator. Renata (Diane Keaton) is a poet whose husband Frederick, a struggling writer, feels eclipsed by her success. Flyn (Kristin Griffith) is a vain actress who is away most of the time filming; the low quality of her films is an object of ridicule behind her back. Joey (Mary Beth Hurt), who is in a relationship with Mike (Sam Waterston), cannot settle on a career, and resents her mother for favoring Renata, while Renata resents their father’s concern over Joey’s lack of direction.

One morning, Arthur unexpectedly announces that he wants a separation from his wife and would like to live alone. Eve, who is clinically depressed and mentally unstable, attempts suicide. The shock of these two events causes a rift between the sisters. Arthur returns from a trip to Greece with Pearl (Maureen Stapleton), a high-spirited and more “normal” woman, whom he intends to marry. His daughters are disturbed that Arthur would disregard Eve’s suicide attempt and find another woman, whom Joey refers to as a “vulgarian”.

Interiors Movie Poster (1978)

Interiors (1978)

Directed by: Woody Allen
Starring: Diane Keaton, Geraldine Page, Kristin Griffith, Mary Beth Hurt, Richard Jordan, Sam Waterston, Missy Hope, Kerry Duffy
Screenplay by: Woody Allen
Production Design by: Mel Bourne
Cinematography by: Gordon Willis
Film Editing by: Ralph Rosenblum
Costume Design by: Joel Schumacher
Set Decoration by: Mario Mazzola, Daniel Robert
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: August 2, 1978

Equus (1977)

Equus (1977)

Taglines: I am yours and you are mine.

A psychiatrist, Martin Dysart, investigates the savage blinding of six horses with a metal spike in a stable in Hampshire, England. The atrocity was committed by an unassuming seventeen-year-old stable boy named Alan Strang, the only son of an opinionated but inwardly-timid father and a genteel, religious mother. As Dysart exposes the truths behind the boy’s demons, he finds himself face-to-face with his own.

Equus is a 1977 British-American drama film directed by Sidney Lumet and starring Richard Burton. Peter Shaffer wrote the screenplay based on his play Equus. The film also featured Peter Firth, Colin Blakely, Joan Plowright, Eileen Atkins, and Jenny Agutter.

Awards and Nominations

Academy Awards
Best Actor – Richard Burton (nominated)
Best Supporting Actor – Peter Firth (nominated)
Best Adapted Screenplay – Peter Shaffer (nominated)

Golden Globes
Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama – Richard Burton (won)
Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture – Peter Firth (won)

BAFTAs
BAFTA Award for Best Supporting Actress – Jenny Agutter (won)
BAFTA Award for Best Film Music – Richard Rodney Bennett (nominated)
BAFTA Award for Best Supporting Actress – Joan Plowright (nominated)
BAFTA Award for Best Supporting Actor – Colin Blakely (nominated)
BAFTA Award for Best Screenplay — Peter Shaffer (nominated)

Equus Movie Poster (1977)

Equus (1977)

Directed by: Sidney Lumet
Starring: Richard Burton, Peter Firth, Colin Blakely, Joan Plowright, Harry Andrews, Eileen Atkins, Jenny Agutter, Kate Reid
Screenplay by: Peter Shaffer
Production Design by: Tony Walton
Cinematography by: Oswald Morris
Film Editing by: John Victor-Smith
Costume Design by: Tony Walton
Art Direction by: Simon Holland
Music by: Richard Rodney Bennett
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: October 14, 1977

Bound for Glory (1976)

Bound for Glory (1976)

During the Great Depression in the 1930s, Midwesterner Guthrie (David Carradine) plays music locally but cannot make enough as a sign painter to support his wife (Melinda Dillon) and children. With only his paintbrushes, Woody joins the migration westward from the Dust Bowl to supposedly greener California pastures via boxcar and hitchhiking. Much of the film is based on Guthrie’s attempt to humanize the desperate Okie Dust Bowl refugees in California during the Great Depression.

Bound for Glory is a 1976 American film directed by Hal Ashby and loosely adapted by Robert Getchell from Woody Guthrie’s 1943 autobiography Bound for Glory. The film stars David Carradine as folk singer Woody Guthrie and Ronny Cox, Melinda Dillon, Gail Strickland, John Lehne, Ji-Tu Cumbuka and Randy Quaid.

Bound for Glory was the first motion picture in which inventor/operator Garrett Brown used his new Steadicam for filming moving scenes. Director of Photography Haskell Wexler won an Oscar for Best Cinematography (1976).

All of the main events and characters, except for Guthrie and his first wife, Mary, are entirely fictional. The film ends with Guthrie singing his most famous song, “God Blessed America” (subsequently retitled “This Land Is Your Land”), on his way to New York, but, in fact, the song was composed in New York in 1940 and forgotten by him until five years later.

Bound for Glory Movie Poster  (1976)

Bound for Glory (1976)

Directed by: Hal Ashby
Starring: David Carradine, Ronny Cox, Melinda Dillon, Gail Strickland, John Lehne, Ji-Tu Cumbuka, Randy Quaid
Screenplay by: Robert Getchell
Production Design by: Michael D. Haller
Cinematography by: Haskell Wexler
Film Editing by: Pembroke J. Herring, Robert C. Jones
Costume Design by: William Ware Theiss
Set Decoration by: James L. Berkey
Art Direction by: James H. Spencer, Bill Sully
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: December 5, 1976

Manhattan (1979)

Manhattan (1979)

Forty-two year old Isaac Davis has a romanticized view of his hometown, New York City, most specifically Manhattan, as channeled through the lead character in the first book he is writing, despite his own Manhattan-based life being more of a tragicomedy. He has just quit his job as a hack writer for a bad television comedy, he, beyond the ten second rush of endorphins during the actual act of quitting, now regretting the decision, especially as he isn’t sure he can live off his book writing career.

He is paying two alimonies, his second ex-wife, Jill Davis, a lesbian, who is writing her own tell-all book of their acrimonious split. The one somewhat positive aspect of his life is that he is dating a young woman named Tracy, although she is only seventeen and still in high school. Largely because of their differences a big part of which is due to their ages, he does not see a long term future with her. His life has the potential to be even more tragicomical when he meets journalist Mary.

Manhattan is a 1979 American romantic comedy-drama film directed by Woody Allen and produced by Charles H. Joffe. The screenplay was written by Allen and Marshall Brickman. Allen co-stars as a twice-divorced 42-year-old comedy writer who dates a 17-year-old girl (Mariel Hemingway) but falls in love with his best friend’s (Michael Murphy) mistress (Diane Keaton). Meryl Streep and Anne Byrne also star.

Manhattan was filmed in black-and-white and 2.35:1 widescreen. The film features music composed by George Gershwin, including Rhapsody in Blue, which inspired the idea behind the film. Allen described the film as a combination of his previous two films, Annie Hall and Interiors.

The film was met with widespread critical acclaim and was nominated for two Academy Awards: Best Supporting Actress for Hemingway and Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen for Allen and Brickman. Its North American box office receipts of $39.9 million made it Allen’s second biggest box office hit (after adjusting for inflation). Often considered one of Allen’s best films,[4][5] it ranks 46th on AFI’s 100 Years…100 Laughs list and number 63 on Bravo’s “100 Funniest Movies”. In 2001, the United States Library of Congress deemed the film “culturally significant” and selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry.

Manhattan Movie Poster (1979)

Manhattan (1979)

Directed by: Woody Allen
Starring: Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Mariel Hemingway, Michael Murphy, Meryl Streep, Anne Byrne Hoffman, Karen Ludwig, Tisa Farrow
Screenplay by: Woody Allen, Marshall Brickman
Production Design by: Mel Bourne
Cinematography by: Gordon Willis
Film Editing by: Susan E. Morse
Costume Design by: Albert Wolsky
Set Decoration by: Robert Drumheller
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: April 25, 1979

Last Tango in Paris (1972)

Last Tango in Paris (1972)

While looking for an apartment, Jeanne, a beautiful young Parisienne, encounters Paul, a mysterious American expatriate mourning his wife’s recent suicide. Instantly drawn to each other, they have a stormy, passionate affair, in which they do not reveal their names to each other. Their relationship deeply affects their lives, as Paul struggles with his wife’s death and Jeanne prepares to marry her fiance, Tom, a film director making a cinema-verite documentary about her.

Last Tango in Paris (Italian: Ultimo tango a Parigi) is a 1972 Franco-Italian erotic drama film directed by Bernardo Bertolucci which portrays a recently widowed American who begins an anonymous sexual relationship with a young betrothed Parisian woman. It stars Marlon Brando, Maria Schneider, and Jean-Pierre Léaud.

The film’s raw portrayal of sexual violence and emotional turmoil led to international controversy and drew various levels of government censorship in different venues. Upon release in the United States, the most graphic scene was cut and the MPAA gave the film an X rating. After revisions were made to the MPAA ratings code, in 1997 the film was re-classified NC-17 for “some explicit sexual content”. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer released a censored R-rated cut in 1981.

Last Tango in Paris (1972)

About the Story

Paul (Marlon Brando), a middle-aged American hotel owner mourning his wife’s suicide, meets a young, engaged Parisian woman named Jeanne (Maria Schneider) at an apartment that both are interested in renting. Paul takes the apartment after they begin an anonymous sexual relationship there. He insists that neither of them must share any personal information, even given names. The affair continues until one day, Jeanne arrives at the apartment and finds that Paul has packed up and left without warning.

Paul later meets Jeanne on the street and says he wants to renew the relationship. He tells her of the recent tragedy of his wife. As he tells his life story, they walk into a tango bar, where he continues telling her about himself. The loss of anonymity disillusions Jeanne about their relationship. She tells Paul she does not want to see him again. Paul, not wanting to let Jeanne go, chases her back to her apartment, where he tells her he loves her and wants to know her name.

Jeanne takes a gun from a drawer. She tells Paul her name and shoots him. Paul staggers out onto the balcony, mortally wounded, and collapses. As Paul dies, a dazed Jeanne mutters to herself that he was just a stranger who tried to rape her and she did not know who he was, as if in a rehearsal, preparing herself for questioning by the police.

Last Tango in Paris (1972)

Last Tango in Paris Movie Poster (1972)

Last Tango in Paris (1972)

Directed by: Bernardo Bertolucci
Starring: Marlon Brando, Maria Schneider, Maria Michi, Giovanna Galletti, Catherine Allégret, Gitt Magrini, Marie-Hélène Breillat
Screenplay by: Bernardo Bertolucci
Production Design by: Philippe Turlure
Cinematography by: Vittorio Storaro
Film Editing by: Franco Arcalli, Roberto Perpignani
Costume Design by: Gitt Magrini
Set Decoration by: Philippe Turlure
Music by: Gato Barbieri
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: February 7, 1973

Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971)

Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971)

Taglines: It’s about three decent people. They will break your heart.

Divorced working woman Alex and well-to-do Jewish family doctor Daniel Hirsh share not only the same answering service but also the favours of young Bob Elkin who bed-hops between them as the mood takes him. Both Alex and Dr Hirsh are aware of the other’s existence but prefer to live with the situation rather than risk losing Elkin completely. But a wet winter weekend in London can be difficult.

Sunday Bloody Sunday is a 1971 British drama film written by Penelope Gilliatt, directed by John Schlesinger and starring Murray Head, Glenda Jackson and Peter Finch. It tells the story of a free-spirited young bisexual artist (played by Head) and his simultaneous relationships with a female recruitment consultant (Jackson) and a male Jewish doctor (Finch).

The film is significant for its time in that Finch’s homosexual character is depicted as successful and relatively well-adjusted, and not particularly upset by his sexuality. In this sense, Sunday Bloody Sunday was a considerable departure from Schlesinger’s previous film Midnight Cowboy, which had portrayed its gay characters as alienated and self-loathing, as well as other gay-themed films of the era, including Boys in the Band, and Some of My Best Friends Are…. The film was released before the 1972 shooting by the British Army of unarmed protesters in Derry, Northern Ireland, an event dubbed “Bloody Sunday.”

About the Story

Set in London, a middle-aged Jewish doctor, Daniel Hirsh (Peter Finch), and a young woman in her mid-30s, Alex Greville (Glenda Jackson) are both involved in a love triangle with contemporary sculptor Bob Elkin (Murray Head), a younger man in his mid-20s. Not only are Hirsh and Greville both aware that Elkin is seeing the other but they know one another through common friends. Despite this, they are willing to put up with the situation through fear of losing Elkin, who switches freely between them.

For Greville, the relationship is bound up with a growing disillusionment about her professional life, failed marriage and uneasy childhood. For Hirsh, it represents an escape from the repressed nature of his Jewish upbringing. Both realise the lack of permanence about their situation and it is only when Elkin decides to leave the country to settle in New York City after receiving an offer to open his own art gallery to display and sell his artwork, that they both come face to face (for the first time in the narrative at the end). Despite their opposed situations, both Hirsh and Greville come to realize that it is time to move on and Elkin leaves for the USA.

Sunday Bloody Sunday Movie Poster (1971)

Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971)

Directed by: John Schlesinger
Starring: Peter Finch, Glenda Jackson, Murray Head, Peggy Ashcroft, Tony Britton, Maurice Denham, Bessie Love, Vivian Pickles
Screenplay by: Penelope Gilliatt
Production Design by: Luciana Arrighi
Cinematography by: Billy Williams
Film Editing by: Richard Marden
Costume Design by: Jocelyn Rickards
Art Direction by: Norman Dorme
Music by: Ron Geesin
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: July 1, 1971

Being There (1979)

Being There (1979)

Taglines: A story of chance.

A simple-minded gardener named Chance has spent all his life in the Washington D.C. house of an old man. When the man dies, Chance is put out on the street with no knowledge of the world except what he has learned from television. After a run in with a limousine, he ends up a guest of a woman (Eve) and her husband Ben, an influential but sickly businessman. Now called Chauncey Gardner, Chance becomes friend and confidante to Ben, and an unlikely political insider.

Being There is a 1979 American comedy-drama film directed by Hal Ashby. Its screenplay was adapted by Jerzy Kosiński and the uncredited Robert C. Jones from the 1970 novella by Kosiński. The film stars Peter Sellers, Shirley MacLaine, Melvyn Douglas, Richard A. Dysart, Jack Warden, and Richard Basehart.

Douglas won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor and Sellers was nominated for Best Actor. The screenplay won the British Academy Film Award for Best Screenplay and the Writers Guild of America Award for Best Comedy Adapted from Another Medium. It was also nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Screenplay.

The making of the film is portrayed in The Life and Death of Peter Sellers, a biographical film of Sellers’ life. In 2015 the United States Library of Congress selected the film for preservation in the National Film Registry, finding it “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Being There Movie Poster (1979)

Being There (1979)

Directed by: Hal Ashby
Starring: Peter Sellers, Shirley MacLaine, Melvyn Douglas, Jack Warden, Richard Dysart, Denise DuBarry, Richard Basehart
Screenplay by: Jerzy Kosinski
Production Design by: Michael D. Haller
Cinematography by: Caleb Deschanel
Film Editing by: Don Zimmerman
Costume Design by: May Routh
Set Decoration by: Robert R. Benton
Art Direction by: James L. Schoppe
Music by: Johnny Mandel
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: December 19, 1979