The Front Page (1974)

The Front Page (1974)

When Hildy Johnson, the top reporter of a Chicago newspaper announces that he is quitting to get married, his editor, Walter Burns desperately tries to change his mind.

When denial, cursing, and luring don’t work, Walter resorts to tricks. It’s the day before a supposed communist is to be hanged, and all Chicago waits with baited breath. Meanwhile, each of the papers has a man on the story trying to get a scoop or angle for themselves. With a train to catch at midnight to join his fiancé, Hildy is at first not interested, but events and his own habits work against him as the day unfolds, and he can’t help but get roped in, especially when the man to be executed escapes and then almost literally falls into his lap.

The Front Page is a 1974 American comedy-drama film directed by Billy Wilder and starring Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau. The screenplay by Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond is based on Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur’s play of the same name (1928), which inspired several other films.

About the Story

Chicago Examiner reporter Hildebrand “Hildy” Johnson (Jack Lemmon) has just quit his job in order to marry Peggy Grant (Susan Sarandon) and start a new career, when convict Earl Williams (Austin Pendleton) escapes from death row just prior to his execution. Earl is an impoverished, bumbling leftist whose only offense is stuffing fortune cookies with messages demanding the release of Sacco and Vanzetti, but the yellow press of Chicago has painted him as a dangerous threat from Moscow. As a result, the citizenry are anxious to see him put to death.

Earl has not left the jail, and enters the prison pressroom while Hildy is alone there. Hildy cannot resist the lure of what could be the biggest scoop of his soon-to-be-over career. Ruthless, egomaniacal managing editor Walter Burns (Walter Matthau), desperate to keep Hildy on the job, encourages him to cover the story, frustrating Peggy, who is eager to catch their train. When Earl is in danger of being discovered, Mollie Malloy (Carol Burnett), a self-described “$2 whore from Division Street” who befriended Earl, creates a distraction by leaping from the third-floor window.

When Earl is caught, Hildy and Walter are arrested for aiding and abetting a fugitive, but are released when they discover that the mayor and sheriff colluded to conceal Earl’s last-minute reprieve by the governor. Walter grudgingly accepts that he is losing his ace reporter and presents him with a watch as a token of his appreciation. Hildy and Peggy set off to get married, and Walter telegraphs the next railway station to alert them that the man who stole his watch is on the inbound train and should be apprehended by the police.

The Front Page (1974) Movie Poster

The Front Page (1974)

Directed by: Billy Wilder
Starring: Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau, Susan Sarandon, Vincent Gardenia, David Wayne, Allen Garfield, Austin Pendleton
Screenplay by: Billy Wilder, I.A.L. Diamond
Cinematography by: Jordan Cronenweth
Film Editing by: Ralph E. Winters
Costume Design by: Burton Miller
Set Decoration by: James W. Payne
Distributed by: Universal Pictures
Release Date: December 17, 1974

Same Time, Next Year (1978)

Same Time, Next Year (1978)

In 1951, at an inn located on the Mendocino County coast, Doris (Ellen Burstyn), a 24-year-old housewife from Oakland, meets George (Alan Alda) a 27-year-old accountant from New Jersey at dinner. They have a sexual tryst, and then agree to meet once a year to rekindle the sparks they experience at their first meeting, despite the fact that both are happily married, with six children between them. They each discuss their respective yet unseen spouses, “Harry” and “Helen.”

Over the course of the next 26 years, they develop an emotional intimacy deeper than what one would expect to find between two people meeting for a clandestine relationship just once a year. During the time they spend with each other, they discuss births, deaths, including George’s son Michael dying in Vietnam, which changes George politically, and marital problems each experiences at home, while they adapt themselves to the social changes affecting their lives.

At their meeting in 1977, George explains that his wife, Helen, has died of cancer earlier in the year, and revealed to a friend that she had known of the affair for 10 years without telling George. Now a widower, George proposes to Doris who refuses to accept because of her loyalty to, and respect for, Harry. Rejected, George leaves for good, only to return with the promise to continue the affair as long as they are able.

Same Time, Next Year is a 1978 American romantic comedy-drama film directed by Robert Mulligan. The screenplay by Bernard Slade is based on his 1975 play of the same title. The film stars Alan Alda and Ellen Burstyn.

Same Time, Next Year (1978) Movie Poster

Same Time, Next Year (1978)

Directed by: Robert Mulligan
Starring; Alan Alda, Ellen Burstyn, Ivan Bonar, Bernie Kuby, Cosmo Sardo, David Northcutt, William Cantrell
Screenplay by: Bernard Slade
Production Design by: Henry Bumstead
Cinematography by: Robert Surtees
Film Editing by: Sheldon Kahn
Costume Design by: Theadora Van Runkle
Set Decoration by: Hal Gausman
Music by: Marvin Hamlisch
Distributed by: Universal Pictures
Release Date: November 22, 1978

Saturday Night Fever (1977)

Saturday Night Fever (1977)

Taglines: Where do you go when the record is over.

Nineteen-year-old Brooklyn native Tony Manero lives for Saturday nights at the local disco, where he’s king of the club, thanks to his stylish moves on the dance floor. But outside of the club, things don’t look so rosy. At home, Tony fights constantly with his father and has to compete with his family’s starry-eyed view of his older brother, a priest. Nor can he find satisfaction at his dead-end job at a small paint store.

However, things begin to change when he spies Stephanie Mangano in the disco and starts training with her for the club’s dance competition. Stephanie dreams of the world beyond Brooklyn, and her plans to move to Manhattan just over the bridge soon change Tony’s life forever.

Saturday Night Fever is a 1977 American dance film directed by John Badham and starring John Travolta as Tony Manero, a young man whose weekends are spent visiting a local Brooklyn discotheque; Karen Lynn Gorney as Stephanie Mangano, his dance partner and eventual friend; and Donna Pescow as Annette, Tony’s former dance partner and would-be girlfriend. While in the disco, Tony is the king. His care-free youth and weekend dancing help him to temporarily forget the reality of his life: a dead-end job, clashes with his unsupportive and squabbling parents, racial tensions in the local community, and his associations with a gang of macho friends.

Saturday Night Fever (1977)

A huge commercial success, the film significantly helped to popularize disco music around the world and made Travolta, already well known from his role on TV’s Welcome Back, Kotter, a household name. The Saturday Night Fever soundtrack, featuring disco songs by the Bee Gees, is one of the best-selling soundtracks of all time.

The film is the first example of cross-media marketing, with the tie-in soundtrack’s single being used to help promote the film before its release and the film popularizing the entire soundtrack after its release. The film also showcased aspects of the music, the dancing, and the subculture surrounding the disco era: symphony-orchestrated melodies; haute couture styles of clothing; pre-AIDS sexual promiscuity; and graceful choreography.

The story is based upon a 1976 New York magazine article by British writer Nik Cohn, “Tribal Rites of the New Saturday Night”. In the mid-1990s, Cohn acknowledged that he fabricated the article.[4] A newcomer to the United States and a stranger to the disco lifestyle, Cohn was unable to make any sense of the subculture he had been assigned to write about; instead, the character who became Tony Manero was based on a Mod[5] acquaintance of Cohn’s. In 2010, Saturday Night Fever was deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthecially significant” by the Library of Congress and therefore preserved for all time in their National Film Registry. The sequel Staying Alive (1983) also starred John Travolta and was directed by Sylvester Stallone.

Saturday Night Fever Movie Poster (1977)

Saturday Night Fever (1977)

Directed by: John Badham
Starring: John Travolta, Karen Lynn Gorney, Barry Miller, Joseph Cali, Donna Pescow, Paul Pape, Julie Bovasso, Sam Coppola, Fran Drescher
Screenplay by: Norman Wexler
Production Design by: Charles Bailey
Cinematography by: Ralf D. Bode
Film Editing by: David Rawlins
Costume Design by: Patrizia von Brandenstein
Set Decoration by: George DeTitta Sr.
Music by: Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb, Robin Gibb
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: December 14, 1977

The Day of the Jackal (1973)

The Day of the Jackal (1973)

In the Paris suburb of Petit-Clamart on 22 August 1962, an assassination attempt is made on the President of France General Charles de Gaulle by the militant French underground organisation OAS in anger over the French government granting independence to Algeria.

As the president’s motorcade passes, de Gaulle’s unarmoured Citroën DS car is raked with machine gun fire, but the entire entourage escapes without injury. Within six months, OAS leader Jean Bastien-Thiry and several other members of the plot are captured and Bastien-Thiry is executed.

The remaining OAS leaders, now exiled in Vienna, decide to make another attempt, and hire a professional British assassin (Edward Fox) who chooses the code name “Jackal”. Agreeing to the killer’s demand of half a million US dollars for his services, the OAS leaders order several bank robberies to raise the money.

Meanwhile, the Jackal begins to plan his assassination of the highly protected French president. He travels to Genoa and commissions a custom-made rifle and fake identity papers. As a professional, he spares the reliable gunsmith, but kills the forger when the man attempts blackmail. In Paris, he sneaks an impression of the key to a flat that overlooks the Place du 18 juin 1940.

In Rome, where the OAS team have moved, members of the French Action Service identify and kidnap the OAS chief clerk Viktor Wolenski (Jean Martin). Wolenski dies under interrogation but not before the agents have extracted some elements of the assassination plot, including the word “Jackal”, and reported their findings to the Interior Minister (Alan Badel) who convenes a secret cabinet meeting of the heads of the French security forces.

When asked to provide his best detective, the Police Commissioner Berthier (Timothy West) recommends his own deputy, Claude Lebel (Michel Lonsdale). Soon after, Lebel is given special emergency powers to conduct his investigation, which is complicated by de Gaulle’s express orders for secrecy and his refusal to change any of his planned public appearances.

As the investigation progresses, Colonel St. Clair (Barrie Ingham), a personal aide to the President and one of the cabinet members, discloses the government’s knowledge of the plot through pillow talk to his new mistress Denise (Olga Georges-Picot), who immediately passes this information on to her OAS contact. Meanwhile, Lebel uses an old boy network of police agencies in other countries to determine that British suspect Charles Calthrop may be travelling under the name Paul Oliver Duggan, who appears in British records as someone who died as a child. Learning that Duggan has crossed into France, Lebel orders his men to search all hotel registrations in an effort to locate the killer.

The Day of the Jackal is a 1973 Anglo-French political thriller film directed by Fred Zinnemann and starring Edward Fox and Michel Lonsdale. Based on the 1971 novel The Day of the Jackal by Frederick Forsyth, the film is about a professional assassin known only as the “Jackal” who is hired to assassinate French president Charles de Gaulle in the summer of 1963.

The Day of the Jackal received positive reviews and went on to win the BAFTA Award for Best Film Editing (Ralph Kemplen), five additional BAFTA Award nominations, two Golden Globe Award nominations, and one Academy Award nomination. The film grossed $16,056,255 at the box office,[3] and earned an additional $8,525,000 in North American rentals.

The Day of the Jackal Movie Poster (1973)

The Day of the Jackal (1973)

Directed by: Fred Zinnemann
Starring: Edward Fox, Terence Alexander, Michel Auclair, Alan Badel, Tony Britton, Cyril Cusack, Maurice Denham, Olga Georges-Picot
Screenplay by: Kenneth Ross
Cinematography by: Jean Tournier
Film Editing by: Ralph Kemplen
Costume Design by: Joan Bridge, Rosine Delamare, Elizabeth Haffenden
Distributed by: Universal Pictures
Release Date: May 16, 1973

Jesus Christ Superstar (1973)

Jesus Christ Superstar (1973)

The film is framed as a group of performers who travel to the desert to re-enact the Passion of Christ. The film begins with them arriving on a bus, assembling their props, and getting into costume. One of the group is surrounded by the others, puts on a white robe, and emerges as Jesus Christ (“Overture”).

Judas (Anderson) is worried about Jesus’ popularity. He is being hailed as the Son of God, but Judas feels He is just a man, and fears the consequences of their growing movement (“Heaven on Their Minds”). The other disciples badger Jesus for information about his plans for the future, but Jesus will not give them any (“What’s the Buzz?”). Judas’ arrival and subsequent declaration that Jesus should not associate with Mary dampens the mood. Angrily, Jesus tells Judas that he should leave Mary alone, because his slate is not clean. He then accuses all the apostles of not caring about him (“Strange Thing Mystifying”).

Caiaphas is worried that the people will crown Jesus as king, which will upset the Romans. Annas tries to calm him, but he finally sees Caiaphas’ point, and suggests that he convene the council and explain his fears to them. Caiaphas agrees (“Then We Are Decided”). As Jesus and his apostles settle for the night, Mary soothes him with some expensive ointment, but Judas says that the money spent should have been given to the poor. Jesus rebukes him again, telling him that the poor will be there always, but Jesus will not (“Everything’s Alright”).

Meanwhile, the council of the priests discuss their fears about Jesus. Caiaphas tells them that there is only one solution: like John the Baptist, Jesus must be executed for the sake of the nation (“This Jesus Must Die”). Jesus and his followers joyfully arrive in Jerusalem, but Caiaphas orders Jesus to disband the crowd for fear of a riot. Jesus refuses and speaks to the crowd (“Hosanna”).

Later, the apostle Simon Zealotes (Marshall) and a crowd of followers, voice their admiration for Jesus (“Simon Zealotes”). Jesus appreciates this, but becomes worried when Simon suggests directing the crowd towards an uprising against their Roman occupiers. Jesus sadly dismisses this suggestion, saying that they do not understand His true purpose (“Poor Jerusalem”).

Jesus Christ Superstar Movie Poster (1973)

Jesus Christ Superstar (1973)

Directed by: Norman Jewison
Starring: Ted Neeley, Carl Anderson, Yvonne Elliman, Barry Dennen, Larry Marshall, Josh Mostel, Kurt Yaghjian, Paul Thomas
Screenplay by: Melvyn Bragg, Norman Jewison
Production Design by: Richard Macdonald
Cinematography by: Douglas Slocombe
Film Editing by: Antony Gibbs
Costume Design by: Yvonne Blake
Art Direction by: John Clark
Distributed by: Universal Pictures
Release Date: August 15, 1973

Jaws (1975)

Jaws (1975)

Taglines: Do you like fish? Well, he likes you too…

It’s a hot summer on Amity Island, a small community whose main business is its beaches. When new Sheriff Martin Brody discovers the remains of a shark attack victim, his first inclination is to close the beaches to swimmers. This doesn’t sit well with Mayor Larry Vaughn and several of the local businessmen.

Brody backs down to his regret as that weekend a young boy is killed by the predator. The dead boy’s mother puts out a bounty on the shark and Amity is soon swamped with amateur hunters and fisherman hoping to cash in on the reward. A local fisherman with much experience hunting sharks, Quint, offers to hunt down the creature for a hefty fee. Soon Quint, Brody and Matt Hooper from the Oceanographic Institute are at sea hunting the Great White shark. As Brody succinctly surmises after their first encounter with the creature, they’re going to need a bigger boat.

Jaws is a 1975 American thriller film directed by Steven Spielberg and based on Peter Benchley’s 1974 novel of the same name. In the story, a giant man-eating great white shark attacks beachgoers on Amity Island, a fictional New England summer resort town, prompting the local police chief to hunt it with the help of a marine biologist and a professional shark hunter.

The film stars Roy Scheider as police chief Martin Brody, Robert Shaw as shark hunter Quint, Richard Dreyfuss as oceanographer Matt Hooper, Murray Hamilton as Larry Vaughn, the mayor of Amity Island, and Lorraine Gary as Brody’s wife, Ellen. The screenplay is credited to both Benchley, who wrote the first drafts, and actor-writer Carl Gottlieb, who rewrote the script during principal photography.

Jaws Movie Poster (1975)

Jaws (1975)

Directed by: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss, Lorraine Gary, Jeffrey Kramer, Murray Hamilton, Susan Backlinie
Screenplay by: Peter Benchley, Carl Gottlieb
Production Design by: Joe Alves
Cinematography by: Bill Butler
Film Editing by: Verna Fields
Set Decoration by: John M. Dwyer
Music by: John Williams
Distributed by: Universal Pictures
Release Date: June 20, 1975

Amlerican Graffiti (1973)

Amlerican Graffiti (1973)

Taglines: Where were you in ’62?

It’s the proverbial end of the summer 1962 in a small southern California town. It’s the evening before best friends and recent high school graduates, Curt Henderson and Steve Bolander, are scheduled to leave town to head to college back east.

Curt, who received a lucrative local scholarship, is seen as the promise that their class holds. But Curt is having second thoughts about leaving what Steve basically sees as their dead end town. Curt’s beliefs are strengthened when he spots an unknown beautiful blonde in a T-bird who mouths the words “I love you” to him.

As Curt tries to find that blonde while trying to get away from a local gang who have him somewhat hostage, Curt may come to a decision about his immediate future. Outgoing class president Steve, on the other hand, wants to leave, despite meaning that he will leave girlfriend, head cheerleader and Curt’s sister, Laurie Henderson, behind. Steve and Laurie spend the evening “negotiating” the state of their relationship.

American Graffiti is a 1973 American coming-of-age comedy-drama film directed and co-written by George Lucas starring Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Howard, Paul Le Mat, Harrison Ford, Charles Martin Smith, Cindy Williams, Candy Clark, Mackenzie Phillips and Wolfman Jack. Suzanne Somers has a cameo. Set in Modesto, California in 1962, the film is a study of the cruising and rock and roll cultures popular among the post–World War II baby boom generation. The film is told in a series of vignettes, telling the story of a group of teenagers and their adventures over a single evening.

Amlerican Graffiti (1973)

The genesis of American Graffiti was in Lucas’ own teenage years in early 1960s Modesto. He was unsuccessful in pitching the concept to financiers and distributors but found favor at Universal Pictures after United Artists, 20th Century Fox, Columbia Pictures, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Warner Bros., and Paramount Pictures turned him down. Filming was initially set to take place in San Rafael, California, but the production crew was denied permission to shoot beyond a second day.

American Graffiti premiered on August 2, 1973 at the Locarno International Film Festival in Switzerland and was released on August 11, 1973 in the United States. The film received widespread critical acclaim and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. Produced on a $777,000 budget, it has become one of the most profitable films of all time.

Since its initial release, American Graffiti has garnered an estimated return of well over $200 million in box office gross and home video sales, not including merchandising. In 1995, the United States Library of Congress deemed the film “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” and selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry.

Amlerican Graffiti Movie Poster (1973)

American Graffiti (1973)

Directed by: George Lucas
Starring: Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Howard, Paul Le Mat, Charles Martin Smith, Cindy Williams, Candy Clark, Mackenzie Phillips
Screenplay by: George Lucas, Gloria Katz
Cinematography by: Jan D’Alquen, Ron Eveslage
Film Editing by: Verna Fields, Marcia Lucas, George Lucas
Costume Design by: Aggie Guerard Rodgers
Set Decoration by: Douglas Freeman
Art Direction by: Dennis Lynton Clark
Distributed by: Universal Pictures
Release Date: August 11, 1973

The Sting (1973)

The Sting (1973)

Taglines: …All it takes is a little confidence.

Johnny Hooker and Luther Coleman are `grifters’ or confidence tricksters in 1930s Chicago. Unknown to them, however, one of their victims works for a vicious local gangster named Doyle Lonnegan, and when Lonnegan finds out what has happened he has Luther murdered.

Hooker is not a violent man by nature and admits that he does not know much about killing, but nevertheless wishes to take revenge for his partner’s death. He decides that the best way is to hurt Lonnegan’s pride by relieving him of some of his wealth. He joins forces with another con man named Henry Gondorff, and together they come up with an elaborate plan, not only to cheat Lonnegan, but also to do it in such a way that he never realises that he has been cheated. The plot unfolds with great ingenuity; until the final denouement the audience are never quite sure which developments are for real and which are part of the elaborate scheme.

The Sting is a 1973 American caper film set in September 1936, involving a complicated plot by two professional grifters (Paul Newman and Robert Redford) to con a mob boss (Robert Shaw). The film was directed by George Roy Hill, who had directed Newman and Redford in the western Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Created by screenwriter David S. Ward, the story was inspired by real-life cons perpetrated by brothers Fred and Charley Gondorff and documented by David Maurer in his book The Big Con: The Story of the Confidence Man.

The title phrase refers to the moment when a con artist finishes the “play” and takes the mark’s money. If a con is successful, the mark does not realize he has been “taken” (cheated), at least not until the con men are long gone. The film is played out in distinct sections with old-fashioned title cards, with lettering and illustrations rendered in a style reminiscent of the Saturday Evening Post. The film is noted for its use of ragtime, particularly the melody “The Entertainer” by Scott Joplin, which was adapted for the movie by Marvin Hamlisch (and a top-ten chart single for Hamlisch when released as a single from the film’s soundtrack). The film’s success created a resurgence of interest in Joplin’s work.

The Sting Movie Poster (1973)

The Sting (1973)

Directed by: George Roy Hill
Starring: Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Robert Shaw, Charles Durning, Eileen Brennan, Ray Walston, Harold Gould, Dimitra Arliss
Screenplay by: David S. Ward
Cinematography by: Robert Surtees
Film Editing by: William Reynolds
Costume Design by: Edith Head
Set Decoration by: James W. Payne
Art Direction by: Henry Bumstead
Distributed by: Universal Pictures
Release Date: December 25, 1973

The Deer Hunter (1978)

The Deer Hunter (1978)

Michael, Steven and Nick are young factory workers from Pennsylvania who enlist into the Army to fight in Vietnam. Before they go, Steven marries the pregnant Angela, and their wedding party also serves as the men’s farewell party. After some time and many horrors, the three friends fall in the hands of the Vietcong and are brought to a prison camp in which they are forced to play Russian roulette against each other. Michael makes it possible for them to escape, but they soon get separated again.

The Deer Hunter is a 1978 American epic war drama film co-written and directed by Michael Cimino about a trio of Russian American steelworkers and their service in the Vietnam War. The film stars Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken, John Savage, John Cazale (in his final role), Meryl Streep, and George Dzundza. The story takes place in Clairton, a small working class town on the Monongahela River south of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and then in Vietnam and in Saigon, during the Vietnam War.

The film was based in part on an unproduced screenplay called The Man Who Came to Play by Louis Garfinkle and Quinn K. Redeker, about Las Vegas and Russian roulette. Producer Michael Deeley, who bought the script, hired writer/director Michael Cimino who, with Deric Washburn, rewrote the script, taking the Russian roulette element and placing it in the Vietnam War. The film went over-budget and over-schedule, and ended up costing $15 million. The scenes of Russian roulette were highly controversial on release.

The film won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director for Michael Cimino, and Best Supporting Actor for Christopher Walken, and was named by the American Film Institute as the 53rd greatest American film of all time in the 10th Anniversary Edition of the AFI’s 100 Years… 100 Movies list. In 1996, The Deer Hunter was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

The Deer Hunter Movie Poster (1978)

The Deer Hunter (1978)

Directed by: Michael Cimino
Oyuncular: Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken, John Cazale, John Savage, Meryl Streep, George Dzundza, Rutanya Alda, Amy Wright
Screenplay by: Deric Washburn
Cinematography by: Vilmos Zsigmond
Film Editing by: Peter Zinner
Art Direction by: Ron Hobbs, Kim Swados
Music by: Stanley Myers
Distributed by: Universal Pictures
Release Date: February 23, 1979