Superman (1978)

Superman (1978)

Just before the destruction of the planet Krypton, scientist Jor-El sends his infant son Kal-El on a spaceship to Earth. Raised by kindly farmers Jonathan and Martha Kent, young Clark discovers the source of his superhuman powers and moves to Metropolis to fight evil. As Superman, he battles the villainous Lex Luthor, while, as novice reporter Clark Kent, he attempts to woo co-worker Lois Lane.

Superman (marketed as Superman: The Movie) is a 1978 superhero film directed by Richard Donner. It is based on the DC Comics character of the same name and stars Marlon Brando, Gene Hackman, Christopher Reeve, Margot Kidder, Glenn Ford, Phyllis Thaxter, Jackie Cooper, Trevor Howard, Marc McClure, Terence Stamp, Valerie Perrine, and Ned Beatty. The film depicts Superman’s origin, including his infancy as Kal-El of Krypton and his youthful years in the rural town of Smallville. Disguised as reporter Clark Kent, he adopts a mild-mannered disposition in Metropolis and develops a romance with Lois Lane, while battling the villainous Lex Luthor.

Several directors, most notably Guy Hamilton, and screenwriters (Mario Puzo, David and Leslie Newman, and Robert Benton), were associated with the project before Donner was hired to direct. Tom Mankiewicz was drafted in to rewrite the script and was given a “creative consultant” credit. It was decided to film both Superman and Superman II simultaneously, with principal photography beginning in March 1977 and ending in October 1978. Tensions arose between Donner and the producers, and a decision was made to stop filming the sequel—of which 75 percent had already been completed—and finish the first film.

The most expensive film made up to that point, with a budget of $55 million, Superman was released in December 1978 to critical acclaim and financial success, earning $300 million during its original theatrical run. Reviewers particularly praised Reeve’s performance. It was nominated for three Academy Awards including Best Film Editing, Best Music (Original Score), and Best Sound Mixing, and received a Special Achievement Academy Award for Visual Effects. Groundbreaking in its use of special effects and science fiction/fantasy storytelling, the film’s legacy presaged the mainstream popularity of Hollywood’s superhero film franchises.

Superman (1978) Movie Poster

Superman (1078)

Directed by: Richard Donner
Btarring: Christopher Reeve, Margot Kidder, Gene Hackman, Marlon Brando, Ned Beatty, Jackie Cooper, Glenn Ford, Trevor Howard
Screenplay by: Mario Puzo, David Newman, Leslie Newman
Production Design by: John Barry
Cinematography by: Geoffrey Unsworth
Film Editing by: Stuart Baird, Michael Ellis
Costume Design by: Yvonne Blake
Set Decoration by: Peter Howitt
Music by: John Williams
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: December 15, 1978

Barry Lyndon (1975)

Barry Lyndon (1975)

Taglines: Great was his rise…And much greater his fall.

In the Eighteenth Century, in a small village in Ireland, Redmond Barry is a young farm boy in love with his cousin Nora Brady. When Nora gets engaged to the British Captain John Quin, Barry challenges him to a duel of pistols. He wins and escapes to Dublin but is robbed on the road.

Without an alternative, Barry joins the British Army to fight in the Seven Years War. He deserts and is forced to join the Prussian Army where he saves the life of his captain and becomes his protégé and spy of the Irish gambler Chevalier de Balibari. He helps Chevalier and becomes his associate until he decides to marry the wealthy Lady Lyndon. They move to England and Barry, in his obsession of nobility, dissipates her fortune and makes a dangerous and revengeful enemy.

Barry Lyndon is a 1975 British-American period drama film written, produced, and directed by Stanley Kubrick, based on the 1844 novel The Luck of Barry Lyndon by William Makepeace Thackeray. It stars Ryan O’Neal, Marisa Berenson, Patrick Magee, and Hardy Krüger. The film recounts the exploits of a fictional 18th-century Irish adventurer. Exteriors were shot on location in Ireland, England and Germany.

At the 1975 Academy Awards, the film won four Oscars in production categories. Although having had a modest commercial success and a mixed reception from critics on release, Barry Lyndon is today regarded as one of Kubrick’s finest films. In numerous polls, including those of Village Voice (1999), Sight & Sound (2002, 2012), Time (2005) and BBC, it has been named one of the greatest films ever made.

Barry Lyndon (1975) Movie Poster

Barry Lyndon (1975)

Directed by: Stanley Kubrick
Starring: Ryan O’Neal, Marisa Berenson, Patrick Magee, Hardy Krüger, Steven Berkoff, Gay Hamilton, Marie Kean, Diana Körner
Screenplay by: Stanley Kubrick
Production Design by: Ken Adam
Cinematography by: John Alcott
Film Editing by: Tony Lawson
Costume Design by: Milena Canonero, Ulla-Britt Söderlund
Art Direction by: Roy Walker
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: December 18, 1975

Mad Max (1979)

Mad Max (1979)

Taglines: The Maximum Force of the Future.

Taking place in a dystopian Australia in the near future, Mad Max tells the story of a highway patrolman cruising the squalid back roads that have become the breeding ground of criminals foraging for gasoline and scraps. When his wife and child meet a grisly end at the hands of a motorcycle gang, Max sets out across the barren wastelands in search of revenge.

Mad Max is a 1979 Australian dystopian action film directed by George Miller, produced by Byron Kennedy, and starring Mel Gibson as “Mad” Max Rockatansky, Joanne Samuel, Hugh Keays-Byrne, Steve Bisley, Tim Burns, and Roger Ward. James McCausland and Miller wrote the screenplay from a story by Miller and Kennedy. The film presents a tale of societal collapse, murder, and vengeance set in a post-apocalyptic Australia, in which a vengeful policeman becomes embroiled in a feud with a vicious motorcycle gang. Principal photography took place in and around Melbourne, Australia, and lasted six weeks.

The film initially received a polarized reception upon its release in April 1979, although it won three AACTA Awards and attracted a cult following, while its critical reputation has grown since. The film earned over $100 million worldwide in gross revenue. It held the Guinness record for most profitable film from 1980-1999 and has been credited for further opening up the global market to Australian New Wave films. The film became the first in a series, spawning the sequels The Road Warrior (1981), Beyond Thunderdome (1985), and Fury Road (2015).

Mad Max (1979) Movie Poster

Mad Max (1979)

Directed by: George Miller
Starring: Mel Gibson, Joanne Samuel, Hugh Keays-Byrne, Steve Bisley, Tim Burns, Roger Ward, Lisa Aldenhoven, Robina Chaffey
Screenplay by: James McCausland, George Miller
Cinematography by: David Eggby
Film Editing by: Cliff Hayes, Tony Paterson
Costume Design by: Clare Griffin
Art Direction by: Jon Dowding
Music by: Brian May
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: April 12, 1979

Deliverance (1972)

Deliverance (1972)

Taglines: What _did_ happen on the Cahulawassee River?

The Cahulawassee River valley in Northern Georgia is one of the last natural pristine areas of the state, which will soon change with the imminent building of a dam on the river, which in turn will flood much of the surrounding land. As such, four Atlanta city slickers – alpha male Lewis Medlock, generally even-keeled Ed Gentry, slightly condescending Bobby Trippe, and wide-eyed Drew Ballinger – decide to take a multi-day canoe trip on the river, with only Lewis and Ed having experience in outdoor life.

They know going in that the area is ethno-culturally homogeneous and isolated, but don’t understand the full extent of such until they arrive and see what they believe is the result of generations of inbreeding. Their relatively peaceful trip takes a turn for the worse when half way through they encounter a couple of hillbilly moonshiners. That encounter not only makes the four battle their way out of the valley intact and alive, but threatens the relationships of the four as they do…

Deliverance is a 1972 American dramatic thriller film produced and directed by John Boorman, and starring Jon Voight, Burt Reynolds, Ned Beatty and Ronny Cox, with the latter two making their feature film debuts. The film is based on the 1970 novel of the same name by American author James Dickey, who has a small role in the film as the Sheriff. The screenplay was written by Dickey and an uncredited Boorman. It was a critical success, earning three Academy Awards and five Golden Globe nominations.

Widely acclaimed as a landmark picture, the film is noted both for the music scene near the beginning, with one of the city men playing “Dueling Banjos” on guitar with a banjo-playing country boy, that sets the tone for what lies ahead—a trip into unknown and potentially dangerous wilderness—and for its visceral and notorious male rape scene. In 2008, Deliverance was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”. It is one of the earliest made films on the National Film Registry in which all the main actors, around whom the plot develops, are still living.

Deliverance (1972) Movie Poster

Deliverance (1972)

Directed by: John Boorman
Starring: Jon Voight, Burt Reynolds, Ned Beatty, Ronny Cox, Billy Redden, Seamon Glass, Bill McKinney, Herbert ‘Cowboy’ Coward, Kathy Rickman
Screenplay by: James Dickey
Cinematography by: Vilmos Zsigmond
Film Editing by: Tom Priestley
Set Decoration by: Morris Hoffman
Art Direction by: Fred Harpman
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: July 30, 1972

McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971)

McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971)

Taglines: Name your poison.

Set in winter in the Old West. Charismatic but dumb John McCabe arrives in a young Pacific Northwest town to set up a whorehouse/tavern. The shrewd Mrs. Miller, a professional madam, arrives soon after construction begins. She offers to use her experience to help McCabe run his business, while sharing in the profits.

The whorehouse thrives and McCabe and Mrs. Miller draw closer, despite their conflicting intelligences and philosophies. Soon, however, the mining deposits in the town attract the attention of a major corporation, which wants to buy out McCabe along with the rest. He refuses, and his decision has major repercussions for him, Mrs. Miller, and the town.

McCabe & Mrs. Miller is a 1971 American Revisionist Western film starring Warren Beatty and Julie Christie, and directed by Robert Altman. The screenplay is based on Edmund Naughton’s 1959 novel McCabe. Altman referred to it as an “anti-western film” because the film ignores or subverts a number of Western conventions. In 2010, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant”.

McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971) Movie Poster

McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971)

Directed by: Robert Altman
Starring: Warren Beatty, Julie Christie, Rene Auberjonois, William Devane, John Schuck, Corey Fischer, Bert Remsen, Shelley Duvall
Screenplay by: Robert Altman
Production Design by: Leon Ericksen
Cinematography by: Vilmos Zsigmond
Film Editing by: Lou Lombardo
Art Direction by: Al Locatelli, Philip Thomas
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: June 24, 1971

La Nuit Américaine – Day for Night (1973)

La Nuit Américaine - Day for Night (1973)

Taglines: A movie for people who love movies.

Day for Night chronicles the production of Je Vous Présente Paméla (Meet Pamela, also referred to as I want you to meet Pamela), a clichéd melodrama starring aging screen icon Alexandre (Jean-Pierre Aumont), former diva Séverine (Valentina Cortese), young heart-throb Alphonse (Jean-Pierre Léaud) and a British actress, Julie Baker (Jacqueline Bisset) who is recovering from both a nervous breakdown and the controversy leading to her marriage with her much older doctor.

In between are several small vignettes chronicling the stories of the crew-members and the director; Ferrand (Truffaut himself) who tangles with the practical problems one deals with when making a movie. Behind the camera, the actors and crew go through several romances, affairs, break-ups, and sorrows. The production is especially shaken up when one of the secondary actresses is revealed to be pregnant. Later Alphonse’s fiancée leaves him for the film’s stuntman, which leads Alphonse into a palliative one-night stand with an accommodating Julie; whereupon, mistaking Julie’s pity sex for true love, the infantile Alphonse informs Julie’s husband of the affair. Finally, Alexandre dies on the way to hospital after a car accident.

Day for Night (French: La Nuit américaine) is a 1973 French film directed by François Truffaut. It stars Jacqueline Bisset and Jean-Pierre Léaud. It is named after the filmmaking process referred to in French as la nuit américaine (“American night”), whereby sequences filmed outdoors in daylight are shot using film stock balanced for tungsten (indoor) light and underexposed (or adjusted during post production) to appear as if they are taking place at night. In English the technique is called day for night, and the film’s title is thus translated as Day for Night.

La Nuit Américaine - Day for Night Movie Poster (1973)

La Nuit Américaine – Day for Night (1973)

Directed by: François Truffaut
Starring: Jacqueline Bisset, Jean-Pierre Léaud, François Truffaut, Valentina Cortese, Jean-Pierre Aumont, Nathalie Baye, Maurice Seveno
Screenplay by: François Truffaut, Jean-Louis Richard
Production Design by: Damien Lanfranchi
Cinematography by: Pierre-William Glenn
Film Editing by: Martine Barraqué, Yann Dedet
Costume Design by: Monique Dury
Art Direction by: Damien Lanfranchi
Music by: Georges Delerue
Distributed by: Columbia Pictures, Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: May 24, 1973

Klute (1971)

Klute (1971)

Taglines: Lots of guys swing with a call girl like Bree. One guy just wants to kill her.

Six months after the disappearance of Tuscarora, PA businessman Tom Gruneman, his boss, Peter Cable, and his wife, Holly Gruneman, hire Tom’s best friend, private detective John Klute to find out what happened to Tom, as the police have been unable to do so, and despite John having no expertise in missing persons cases. The only lead is a typewritten obscene letter Tom purportedly sent to Manhattan actress / model / call girl Bree Daniel, who admits to having received such letters from someone, and since having received several obscene telephone calls as well.

The suggestion/belief is that Tom was one of Bree’s past johns, although she has no recollection of him when shown his photograph. Bree tricking is more a compulsion than a financial need. In their initial encounters, John and Bree do whatever they can to exert their psychological dominance over the other, especially as Bree initially refused to even speak to him.

Klute (1971) - Jane Fonda

Klute is a 1971 crime-thriller film directed and produced by Alan J. Pakula, written by Andy and Dave Lewis, and starring Jane Fonda, Donald Sutherland, Charles Cioffi, and Roy Scheider. It tells the story of a high-priced prostitute who assists a detective in solving a missing person’s case.

Klute is the first installment of what informally came to be known as Pakula’s “paranoia trilogy”. The other two films in the trilogy are The Parallax View (1974) and All The President’s Men (1976).

The film includes a cameo appearance by Warhol superstars actress Candy Darling, and another by All in the Family costar Jean Stapleton. The music was composed by Michael Small. Jane Fonda won the Academy Award for Best Actress for her role in the film.

Klute Movie Poster (1971)

Klute (1971)

Directed by: Alan J. Pakula
Starring: Jane Fonda, Donald Sutherland, Charles Cioffi, Roy Scheider, Dorothy Tristan, Rita Gam, Nathan George, Vivian Nathan
Screenplay by: Andy Lewis, David E. Lewis
Cinematography by: Gordon Willis
Film Editing by: Carl Lerner
Costume Design by: Ann Roth
Set Decoration by: John Mortensen
Art Direction by: George Jenkins
Music by: Michael Small
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: June 25, 1971

All the President’s Men (1976)

All the President's Men (1976)

On June 17, 1972, a security guard (Frank Wills, playing himself) at the Watergate complex finds a door kept unlocked with tape. He calls the police, who find and arrest five burglars in the Democratic National Committee headquarters within the complex. The next morning, The Washington Post assigns new reporter Bob Woodward (Robert Redford) to the local courthouse to cover the story, which is thought to be of minor importance.

Woodward learns that the five men, four Cuban-Americans from Miami and James W. McCord, Jr., had bugging equipment and have their own “country club” attorney. At the arraignment, McCord identifies himself in court as having recently left the Central Intelligence Agency and the others also have CIA ties. Woodward connects the burglars to E. Howard Hunt, a former employee of the CIA, and President Richard Nixon’s Special Counsel Charles Colson.

Carl Bernstein (Dustin Hoffman), another Post reporter, is assigned to cover the Watergate story with Woodward. The two are reluctant partners, but work well together. Executive editor Benjamin Bradlee (Jason Robards) believes their work is incomplete, however, and not worthy of the Post’s front page. He encourages them to continue to gather information.

Woodward contacts “Deep Throat” (Hal Holbrook), a senior government official, an anonymous source he has used in the past. Communicating through copies of The New York Times and a balcony flowerpot, they meet in a parking garage in the middle of the night. Deep Throat speaks in riddles and metaphors about the Watergate break-in, but advises Woodward to “follow the money.”

Over the next few weeks, Woodward and Bernstein connect the five burglars to thousands of dollars in diverted campaign contributions to Nixon’s Committee to Re-elect the President (CRP, or CREEP). Bradlee and others at the Post dislike the two young reporters’ reliance on unnamed sources like Deep Throat, and wonder why the Nixon administration would break the law when the President is likely to defeat Democratic nominee George McGovern.

Through former CREEP treasurer Hugh W. Sloan, Jr. (Stephen Collins), Woodward and Bernstein connect a slush fund of hundreds of thousands of dollars to White House Chief of Staff H. R. Haldeman—”the second most important man in this country”—and former Nixon Attorney General John N. Mitchell, now head of CREEP. They learn that CREEP used the fund to begin a “ratfucking” campaign to sabotage Democratic presidential candidates a year before the Watergate burglary, when Nixon was behind Edmund Muskie in the polls.

Bradlee’s demand for thoroughness forces the reporters to obtain other sources to confirm the Haldeman connection. When the White House issues a non-denial denial of the Post’s above-the-fold story, the editor thus continues to support them.

At the subtle climax, Woodward again meets secretly with Deep Throat, who finally reveals that the Watergate break-in and cover-up was indeed masterminded by Haldeman. Deep Throat also claims that the cover-up was not to hide the other burglaries or of their involvement with CREEP, but to hide the “covert operations” involving “the entire U.S. intelligence community”, and warns that Woodward, Bernstein, and others’ lives are in danger. When Woodward and Bernstein relay this to Bradlee, he urges the reporters to continue despite the risk and Nixon’s re-election.

All the President’s Men is a 1976 American political thriller film directed by Alan J. Pakula. The screenplay by William Goldman is based on the 1974 non-fiction book of the same name by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, the two journalists investigating the Watergate scandal for The Washington Post. The film starred Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman as Woodward and Bernstein, respectively; it was produced by Walter Coblenz for Redford’s Wildwood Enterprises.

All the President’s Men is the third installment of what informally came to be known as Pakula’s “paranoia trilogy”. The other two films in the trilogy are Klute (1971) and The Parallax View (1974).

In 2010, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

All the President's Men Movie Poster (1976)

All the President’s Men (1976)

Directed by: Alan J. Pakula
Starring: Dustin Hoffman, Robert Redford, Jack Warden, Martin Balsam, Hal Holbrook, Jane Alexander, Meredith Baxter, Robert Walden
Screenplay by: William Goldman
Production Design by: George Jenkins
Cinematography by: Gordon Willis
Film Editing by: Robert L. Wolfe
Set Decoration by: George Gaines
Music by: David Shire
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: April 9, 1976

A Star is Born (1976)

A Star is Born (1976)

Talented rock star John Norman Howard has seen his career begin to decline. Too many years of concerts and managers and life on the road have made him cynical and the monotony has taken its toll. Then he meets the innocent, pure and very talented singer Esther Hoffman. As one of his songs in the movie says “I’m gonna take you girl, I’m gonna show you how.” And he does. He shows Esther the way to stardom while forsaking his own career. As they fall in love, her success only makes his decline even more apparent.

A Star Is Born is a 1976 American musical drama film telling the story of a young woman, played by Barbra Streisand, who enters show business, and meets and falls in love with an established male star, played by Kris Kristofferson, only to find her career ascending while his goes into decline. It is a remake of two earlier versions – the 1937 version was a drama starring Janet Gaynor and Fredric March, and the 1954 version was a musical starring Judy Garland and James Mason.

A Star is Born Movie Poster (1976)

A Star is Born (1976)

Directed by: Frank Pierson
Starring: Barbra Streisand, Kris Kristofferson, Gary Busey, Oliver Clark, Venetta Fields, Clydie King, Marta Heflin, Joanne Linville
Screenplay by: William A. Wellman, Robert Carson
Production Design by: Polly Platt
Cinematography by: Robert Surtees
Film Editing by: Peter Zinner
Costume Design by: Seth Banks, Shirlee Strahm
Set Decoration by: Ruby R. Levitt
Art Direction by: William Hiney
Music by: Roger Kellaway
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: December 8, 1976

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

Protagonist Alex DeLarge is an “ultraviolent” youth in futuristic Britain. As with all luck, his eventually runs out and he’s arrested and convicted of murder and rape. While in prison, Alex learns of an experimental program in which convicts are programmed to detest violence. If he goes through the program, his sentence will be reduced and he will be back on the streets sooner than expected. But Alex’s ordeals are far from over once he hits the mean streets of Britain that he had a hand in creating.

A Clockwork Orange is a 1971 dystopian crime film adapted, produced, and directed by Stanley Kubrick, based on Anthony Burgess’s 1962 novel A Clockwork Orange. It employs disturbing, violent images to comment on psychiatry, juvenile delinquency, youth gangs, and other social, political, and economic subjects in a dystopian near-future Britain.

Alex (Malcolm McDowell), the main character, is a charismatic, sociopathic delinquent whose interests include classical music (especially Beethoven), rape, and what is termed “ultra-violence.” He leads a small gang of thugs (Pete, Georgie, and Dim), whom he calls his droogs (from the Russian word друг, “friend,” “buddy”). The film chronicles the horrific crime spree of his gang, his capture, and attempted rehabilitation via controversial psychological conditioning. Alex narrates most of the film in Nadsat, a fractured adolescent slang composed of Slavic (especially Russian), English, and Cockney rhyming slang.

The soundtrack to A Clockwork Orange features mostly classical music selections and Moog synthesizer compositions by Wendy Carlos (then known as Walter Carlos). The artwork of the now-iconic poster of A Clockwork Orange was created by Philip Castle with the layout by designer Bill Gold.

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

About the Story

In futuristic London, Alex DeLarge is the leader of his “droogs”, Georgie, Dim and Pete. One night, after getting intoxicated on drug-ladened “milk-plus”, they engage in an evening of “ultra-violence” including a fight with a rival gang led by Billyboy. They drive to the country home of writer F. Alexander and beat him to the point of crippling him for life. Alex then rapes his wife while singing “Singin’ in the Rain”. The next day, while truant from school, Alex is approached by his probation officer Mr. P. R. Deltoid, who is aware of Alex’s activities and cautions him.

Alex’s droogs express discontent with petty crimes and want more equality and high yield thefts, but Alex asserts his authority by attacking them. Later, Alex invades the home of a wealthy “cat-lady” and bludgeons her with a phallic statue while his droogs remain outside. On hearing sirens, Alex tries to flee but Dim smashes a bottle on his face, stunning him and leaving him to be arrested by the police. With Alex in custody, Mr. Deltoid gloats that the woman he attacked died, making Alex a murderer. He is sentenced to 14 years in prison.

Two years into the sentence, Alex eagerly takes up an offer to be a test subject for the Minister of the Interior’s new Ludovico technique, an experimental aversion therapy for rehabilitating criminals within two weeks. Alex is strapped to a chair, injected with drugs, and forced to watch films of sex and violence with his eyes propped open. Alex becomes nauseated by the films, and then recognizes the films are set to music of his favorite composer, Ludwig van Beethoven.

Fearing the technique will make him sick on hearing Beethoven, Alex begs for the end of the treatment. Two weeks later, the Minister demonstrates Alex’s rehabilitation to a gathering of officials. Alex is unable to fight back against an actor that taunts and attacks him, and becomes ill at the sight of a topless woman. The prison chaplain complains Alex has been robbed of his freewill, but the prison governor asserts that the Ludovico technique will cut down crime and alleviate crowding in the prisons.

Alex is let out as a free man, only to find his parents have sold his possessions as restitution to his victims, and have lent out his room. Alex encounters an elderly vagrant that he had attacked years earlier, and the vagrant and his friends attack him. Alex is saved by two policeman, but shocked to find they are his former droogs Dim and Georgie. They beat him up, drive him to the countryside, and nearly drown him before abandoning him. Alex barely makes it to the doorstep of a nearby home before collapsing.

A Clockwork Orange Movie Poster (1971)

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

Directed by: Stanley Kubrick
Starring: Malcolm McDowell, Patrick Magee, Michael Bates, Warren Clarke, Adrienne Corri, Clive Francis, Aubrey Morris, Miriam Karlin
Screenplay by: Stanley Kubrick
Production Design by: John Barry
Cinematography by: John Alcott
Film Editing by: Bill Butler
Costume Design by: Milena Canonero
Art Direction by: Russell Hagg, Peter Sheilds
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: February 2, 1972