Tommy (1975)

Tommy (1975)

Taglines: Your senses will never be the same.

Nora Walker is told that her British fighter pilot husband is missing in action and presumed killed in World War II. On V.E. Day, Nora gives birth to their son, who she names Tommy. While Tommy is an adolescent, Nora marries Frank, a shifty camp counselor.

Shortly thereafter, Tommy suffers an emotionally traumatic experience associated with his father and step-father, which, based on things told to him at that time, results in him becoming deaf, dumb and blind, a situation which several people exploit for their own pleasure. As Nora tries several things to bring Tommy out of his psychosomatic disabilities, Tommy, now a young man, happens upon pinball as a stimulus.

Playing by intuition, Tommy becomes a pinball master, which in turn makes him, and by association Nora and Frank, rich and famous. Nora literally shatters Tommy to his awakening, which ultimately leads to both the family’s rise and downfall as people initially try to emulate Tommy’s path then rebel against it.

Tommy (1975)

Tommy is a 1975 British musical fantasy film based upon The Who’s 1969 rock opera album Tommy. It was directed by Ken Russell and featured a star-studded cast, including the band members themselves (most notably, lead singer Roger Daltrey, who plays the title role). The other cast members include Ann-Margret, Oliver Reed, Eric Clapton, Tina Turner, Elton John, Arthur Brown, and Jack Nicholson.

Ann-Margret received a Golden Globe Award for her performance, and was also nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress. Pete Townshend was also nominated for an Oscar for his work in scoring and adapting the music for the film. The film was shown at the 1975 Cannes Film Festival, but was not entered into the main competition. In 1975 the film won the award for Rock Movie of the Year in the First Annual Rock Music Awards.

Tommy Movie Poster (1975)

Tommy (1975)

Directed by: Ken Russell
Starring: Roger Daltrey, Ann Margret, Oliver Reed, Eric Clapton, Tina Turner, Elton John, Arthur Brown, Jack Nicholson
Screenplay by: Ken Russell
Cinematography by: Dick Bush, Robin Lehman, Ronnie Taylor
Film Editing by: Stuart Baird
Costume Design by: Shirley Russell
Art Direction by: John Clark
Distributed by: Columbia Pictures
Release Date: March 19, 2016

The Rose (1979)

The Rose (1979)

In late 1969, Mary Rose Foster (Bette Midler) is a famous rock and roll diva known as The Rose. Although a success, she is burnt out and lonely but is kept working by her gruff, greedy manager and promoter Rudge Campbell (Alan Bates). Though loud and brassy, Rose is an insecure alcoholic and former drug user who seems to crave approval in her life. As such, she is determined to return to her hometown, now as a superstar.

After being humiliated by a country singing star named Billy Ray (Harry Dean Stanton) whose songs she performs in her show, Rose takes off with a limousine driver named Houston Dyer (Frederic Forrest) and begins a romance with him. Rudge thinks Houston is just another hanger on, but Rose thinks she has finally met her true love. Houston tells her that he is actually an AWOL sergeant from the Army, and she tells him of her past in Florida.

They have a rocky relationship and her lifestyle of “Sex, Drugs, and Rock & Roll” and constant touring lead her to an inevitable breakdown. Houston and Rose break up and she returns to her hometown with an escort where she tells him about her past. Finally, Rose collapses on stage from a fatal drug overdose (on alcohol, barbiturates and heroin) in the opening minutes of her long-awaited homecoming concert in Jacksonville Florida.

The Rose is a 1979 American drama film which tells the story of a self-destructive 1960s rock star who struggles to cope with the constant pressures of her career and the demands of her ruthless business manager. The film stars Bette Midler, Alan Bates, Frederic Forrest, Harry Dean Stanton, Barry Primus and David Keith.

The story is loosely based on the life of singer Janis Joplin. Originally titled Pearl, after Joplin’s nickname, and the title of her last album, it was fictionalized after her family declined to allow the producers the rights to her story. It was written by Bill Kerby and Bo Goldman from a story by Bill Kerby, and directed by Mark Rydell.

The Rose was nominated for four Academy Awards including Best Actress in a Leading Role (Bette Midler, in her screen debut), Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Frederic Forrest), Best Film Editing and Best Sound. Midler performed the soundtrack album for the film, and the title track became one of her biggest hit singles.

The Rose Movie Poster (1979)

The Rose (1979)

Oirected by: Mark Rydell
Starring: Bette Midler, Alan Bates, Frederic Forrest, Harry Dean Stanton, Barry Primus, David Keith, Sandra McCabe, Don Calfa
Screenplay by: Bo Goldman, Bill Kerby
Production Design by: Richard Macdonald
Cinematography by: Vilmos Zsigmond
Film Editing by: Carroll Timothy O’Meara, Robert L. Wolfe
Costume Design by: Theoni V. Aldredge
Set Decoration by: Bruce Weintraub
Art Direction by: James L. Schoppe
Distributed by: 20th Century Fox
Release Date: November 9, 1979

Breaking Away (1979)

Breaking Away (1979)

Best friends Dave, Mike, Cyril and Moocher have just graduated from high school. Living in the college town of Bloomington, Indiana, they are considered “cutters”: the working class of the town so named since most of the middle aged generation, such as their parents, worked at the local limestone quarry, which is now a swimming hole.

There is great animosity between the cutters and the generally wealthy Indiana University students, each group who have their own turf in town. The dichotomy is that the limestone was used to build the university, which is now seen as being too good for the locals who built it. Although each of the four is a totally different personality from the other three, they also have in common the fact of being unfocused and unmotivated in life. The one slight exception is Dave. Although he has no job and doesn’t know what to do with his life, he is a champion bicycle racer.

Breaking Away is a 1979 American coming of age comedy-drama film produced and directed by Peter Yates and written by Steve Tesich. It follows a group of four male teenagers in Bloomington, Indiana, who have recently graduated from high school. The film stars Dennis Christopher, Dennis Quaid, Daniel Stern, Jackie Earle Haley, Barbara Barrie, Paul Dooley and Robyn Douglass.

Breaking Away won the 1979 Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for Tesich, and received nominations in four other categories, including Best Picture. It also won the 1979 Golden Globe Award for Best Film (Comedy or Musical), and received nominations in three other Golden Globe categories.

As the film’s young lead, Christopher won the 1979 BAFTA Award for Most Promising Newcomer and the 1979 Young Artist Award for Best Juvenile Actor, as well as getting a Golden Globe nomination as New Star of the Year.

The film is ranked eighth on the List of America’s 100 Most Inspiring Movies compiled by the American Film Institute (AFI) in 2006. In June 2008, AFI announced its “Ten top Ten”—the best ten films in ten classic American film genres—after polling over 1,500 people from the creative community. Breaking Away ranked as the eighth best film in the sports genre. Tesich was an alumnus of Indiana University Bloomington. The film was shot in and around Bloomington and on the university’s campus.

Breaking Away Movie Poster (1979)

Breaking Away (1979)

Directed by: Peter Yates
Starring: Dennis Christopher, Dennis Quaid, Daniel Stern, Jackie Earle Haley, Barbara Barrie, Paul Dooley, Hart Bochner, Amy Wright
Screenplay by: Steve Tesich
Cinematography by: Matthew F. Leonetti
Film Editing by: Cynthia Scheider
Costume Design by: Betsy Cox
Set Decoration by: Lee Poll
Distributed by: 20th Century Fox
Release Date: July 13, 1979

Bound for Glory (1976)

Bound for Glory (1976)

During the Great Depression in the 1930s, Midwesterner Guthrie (David Carradine) plays music locally but cannot make enough as a sign painter to support his wife (Melinda Dillon) and children. With only his paintbrushes, Woody joins the migration westward from the Dust Bowl to supposedly greener California pastures via boxcar and hitchhiking. Much of the film is based on Guthrie’s attempt to humanize the desperate Okie Dust Bowl refugees in California during the Great Depression.

Bound for Glory is a 1976 American film directed by Hal Ashby and loosely adapted by Robert Getchell from Woody Guthrie’s 1943 autobiography Bound for Glory. The film stars David Carradine as folk singer Woody Guthrie and Ronny Cox, Melinda Dillon, Gail Strickland, John Lehne, Ji-Tu Cumbuka and Randy Quaid.

Bound for Glory was the first motion picture in which inventor/operator Garrett Brown used his new Steadicam for filming moving scenes. Director of Photography Haskell Wexler won an Oscar for Best Cinematography (1976).

All of the main events and characters, except for Guthrie and his first wife, Mary, are entirely fictional. The film ends with Guthrie singing his most famous song, “God Blessed America” (subsequently retitled “This Land Is Your Land”), on his way to New York, but, in fact, the song was composed in New York in 1940 and forgotten by him until five years later.

Bound for Glory Movie Poster  (1976)

Bound for Glory (1976)

Directed by: Hal Ashby
Starring: David Carradine, Ronny Cox, Melinda Dillon, Gail Strickland, John Lehne, Ji-Tu Cumbuka, Randy Quaid
Screenplay by: Robert Getchell
Production Design by: Michael D. Haller
Cinematography by: Haskell Wexler
Film Editing by: Pembroke J. Herring, Robert C. Jones
Costume Design by: William Ware Theiss
Set Decoration by: James L. Berkey
Art Direction by: James H. Spencer, Bill Sully
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: December 5, 1976

Una Giornata Particolare (1977)

Una Giornata Particolare (1977)

Taglines: A special film about two special people.

On May 8, 1938, the day Hitler visited Mussolini in Rome, Antonietta, a naïve and sentimental homemaker (Loren) stays home doing her usual domestic tasks, while her fascist husband (Vernon) and her six spoilt children take to the streets to follow the parade.

The building is empty except for a neighbor across the complex (Mastroianni), a charming man named Gabriele. He is a radio broadcaster who has been dismissed from his job and is about to be deported to Sardinia because of his anti-fascist stance and his homosexuality. They meet by chance and began to talk. Antonietta is surprised by his opinions and, unaware of his sexual orientation, flirts with him.

Despite their differences, they warm to each other. Antonietta confides to him her troubles with her arrogant and unfaithful husband, and eventually they have sex before he is arrested and her family comes back home. At the end, Antonietta sits near the window and starts reading a book Gabriele has given her (The Three Musketeers) and watches her lover leaving the complex, escorted by fascist policemen; then she turns off the light and goes to bed, where her husband is waiting for her in order to beget the seventh child.

A Special Day (Italian: Una giornata particolare) is a 1977 Italian film directed by Ettore Scola and starring Sophia Loren, Marcello Mastroianni and John Vernon. Set in Rome in 1938, its narrative follows a woman and her neighbor who stay home the day Adolf Hitler visits Benito Mussolini.

The film is an Italian-Canadian co-production. It has received several nominations and awards, including a César Award for Best Foreign Film in 1978 and two Oscar nominations in 1977, and it is featured on the list of the 100 Italian films to be saved.

Una Giornata Particolare Movie Poster (1977)

Una Giornata Particolare (1977)

Directed by: Ettore Scola
Starring: Sophia Loren, Marcello Mastroianni, John Vernon, Françoise Berd, Patrizia Basso, Tiziano De Persio, Maurizio Di Paolantonio
Screenplay by: Ruggero Maccari, Ettore Scola
Production Design by: Luciano Ricceri
Cinematography by: Pasqualino De Santis
Film Editing by: Raimondo Crociani
Costume Design by: Enrico Sabbatini
Set Decoration by: Luciano Ricceri
Music by: Armando Trovajoli
Distributed by: Surf Film
Release Date: August 12, 1977

Paper Moon (1973)

Paper Moon (1973)

Taglines: There’s a sucker born every minute.

Adapted from the novel, “Addie Pray” (1971) by Joe David Brown, Paper Moon is the story of Moses Pray and Addie Loggins. With scenery reminiscent of “The Grapes of Wrath,” the film is set in the depression-era Midwestern region of the United States. As the movie opens, we see a small group of mourners clustered at a graveside.

Among the mourners is Addie, the dead woman’s small daughter. Moses Pray — ostensibly of the “Kansas Bible Company” — approaches the group, as the service concludes, and two of the elderly women remark that the child bears some resemblance to him and asks if he might be related. “If ever a child needed kin, it’s now,” one lady says.

With no knowledge of who her father is, Addie’s only haven is her Aunt’s home in St. Joseph, Missouri. Having identified himself as a “traveling man spreading the Lord’s gospel in these troubled times,” “Mose” is prevailed upon to deliver the helpless child to her Aunt since he’s going that way, anyway.

Paper Moon is a 1973 American comedy-drama film directed by Peter Bogdanovich and released by Paramount Pictures. Screenwriter Alvin Sargent adapted the script from the novel Addie Pray by Joe David Brown. The film, shot in black-and-white, is set in Kansas and Missouri during the Great Depression. It stars the real-life father and daughter pairing of Ryan and Tatum O’Neal as protagonists Moze and Addie.

Paper Moon Movie Poster (1973)

Paper Moon (1973)

Directed by: Peter Bogdanovich
Starring: Ryan O’Neal, Tatum O’Neal, Madeline Kahn, John Hillerman, Jessie Lee Fulton, James N. Harrell, Lila Waters, Yvonne Harrison
Screenplay by: Alvin Sargent
Production Design by: Polly Platt
Cinematography by: László Kovács
Film Editing by: Verna Fields
Costume Design by: Polly Platt
Set Decoration by: John P. Austin
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: May 9, 1973

Manhattan (1979)

Manhattan (1979)

Forty-two year old Isaac Davis has a romanticized view of his hometown, New York City, most specifically Manhattan, as channeled through the lead character in the first book he is writing, despite his own Manhattan-based life being more of a tragicomedy. He has just quit his job as a hack writer for a bad television comedy, he, beyond the ten second rush of endorphins during the actual act of quitting, now regretting the decision, especially as he isn’t sure he can live off his book writing career.

He is paying two alimonies, his second ex-wife, Jill Davis, a lesbian, who is writing her own tell-all book of their acrimonious split. The one somewhat positive aspect of his life is that he is dating a young woman named Tracy, although she is only seventeen and still in high school. Largely because of their differences a big part of which is due to their ages, he does not see a long term future with her. His life has the potential to be even more tragicomical when he meets journalist Mary.

Manhattan is a 1979 American romantic comedy-drama film directed by Woody Allen and produced by Charles H. Joffe. The screenplay was written by Allen and Marshall Brickman. Allen co-stars as a twice-divorced 42-year-old comedy writer who dates a 17-year-old girl (Mariel Hemingway) but falls in love with his best friend’s (Michael Murphy) mistress (Diane Keaton). Meryl Streep and Anne Byrne also star.

Manhattan was filmed in black-and-white and 2.35:1 widescreen. The film features music composed by George Gershwin, including Rhapsody in Blue, which inspired the idea behind the film. Allen described the film as a combination of his previous two films, Annie Hall and Interiors.

The film was met with widespread critical acclaim and was nominated for two Academy Awards: Best Supporting Actress for Hemingway and Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen for Allen and Brickman. Its North American box office receipts of $39.9 million made it Allen’s second biggest box office hit (after adjusting for inflation). Often considered one of Allen’s best films,[4][5] it ranks 46th on AFI’s 100 Years…100 Laughs list and number 63 on Bravo’s “100 Funniest Movies”. In 2001, the United States Library of Congress deemed the film “culturally significant” and selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry.

Manhattan Movie Poster (1979)

Manhattan (1979)

Directed by: Woody Allen
Starring: Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Mariel Hemingway, Michael Murphy, Meryl Streep, Anne Byrne Hoffman, Karen Ludwig, Tisa Farrow
Screenplay by: Woody Allen, Marshall Brickman
Production Design by: Mel Bourne
Cinematography by: Gordon Willis
Film Editing by: Susan E. Morse
Costume Design by: Albert Wolsky
Set Decoration by: Robert Drumheller
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: April 25, 1979

Klute (1971)

Klute (1971)

Taglines: Lots of guys swing with a call girl like Bree. One guy just wants to kill her.

Six months after the disappearance of Tuscarora, PA businessman Tom Gruneman, his boss, Peter Cable, and his wife, Holly Gruneman, hire Tom’s best friend, private detective John Klute to find out what happened to Tom, as the police have been unable to do so, and despite John having no expertise in missing persons cases. The only lead is a typewritten obscene letter Tom purportedly sent to Manhattan actress / model / call girl Bree Daniel, who admits to having received such letters from someone, and since having received several obscene telephone calls as well.

The suggestion/belief is that Tom was one of Bree’s past johns, although she has no recollection of him when shown his photograph. Bree tricking is more a compulsion than a financial need. In their initial encounters, John and Bree do whatever they can to exert their psychological dominance over the other, especially as Bree initially refused to even speak to him.

Klute (1971) - Jane Fonda

Klute is a 1971 crime-thriller film directed and produced by Alan J. Pakula, written by Andy and Dave Lewis, and starring Jane Fonda, Donald Sutherland, Charles Cioffi, and Roy Scheider. It tells the story of a high-priced prostitute who assists a detective in solving a missing person’s case.

Klute is the first installment of what informally came to be known as Pakula’s “paranoia trilogy”. The other two films in the trilogy are The Parallax View (1974) and All The President’s Men (1976).

The film includes a cameo appearance by Warhol superstars actress Candy Darling, and another by All in the Family costar Jean Stapleton. The music was composed by Michael Small. Jane Fonda won the Academy Award for Best Actress for her role in the film.

Klute Movie Poster (1971)

Klute (1971)

Directed by: Alan J. Pakula
Starring: Jane Fonda, Donald Sutherland, Charles Cioffi, Roy Scheider, Dorothy Tristan, Rita Gam, Nathan George, Vivian Nathan
Screenplay by: Andy Lewis, David E. Lewis
Cinematography by: Gordon Willis
Film Editing by: Carl Lerner
Costume Design by: Ann Roth
Set Decoration by: John Mortensen
Art Direction by: George Jenkins
Music by: Michael Small
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: June 25, 1971

The Last Picture Show (1971)

The Last Picture Show (1971)

Taglines: Anarene, Texas, 1951. Nothing much has changed…

In tiny Anarene, Texas, in the lull between World War Two and the Korean Conflict, Sonny and Duane are best friends. Enduring that awkward period of life between boyhood and manhood, the two pass their time the best way they know how — with the movie house, football, and girls. Jacey is Duane’s steady, wanted by every boy in school, and she knows it.

Her daddy is rich and her mom is good looking and loose. It’s the general consensus that whoever wins Jacey’s heart will be set for life. But Anarene is dying a quiet death as folks head for the big cities to make their livings and raise their kids. The boys are torn between a future somewhere out there beyond the borders of town or making do with their inheritance of a run-down pool hall and a decrepit movie house — the legacy of their friend and mentor, Sam the Lion. As high school graduation approaches, they learn some difficult lessons about love, loneliness, and jealousy.

The Last Picture Show is a 1971 American drama film directed and co-written by Peter Bogdanovich, adapted from a semi-autobiographical 1966 novel The Last Picture Show by Larry McMurtry.

Set in a small town in north Texas from November 1951 to October 1952, it is about the coming of age of Sonny Crawford (Timothy Bottoms) and his friend Duane Jackson (Jeff Bridges). The cast includes Cybill Shepherd (in her film debut), Ben Johnson, Eileen Brennan, Ellen Burstyn, Cloris Leachman, Clu Gulager, Randy Quaid and John Hillerman. For aesthetic reasons it was shot in black and white, which was unusual for the time. The film features many songs of Hank Williams and other recording artists played throughout.

The film was nominated for eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Ben Johnson and Jeff Bridges for Best Supporting Actor and Ellen Burstyn and Cloris Leachman for Best Supporting Actress, with Johnson and Leachman winning. In 1998 the film was deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry.

The Last Picture Show Movie Poster (1971)

The Last Picture Show (1971)

Directed by: Peter Bogdanovich
Starring: Timothy Bottoms, Jeff Bridges, Cybill Shepherd, Ben Johnson, Cloris Leachman, Ellen Burstyn, Eileen Brennan
Screenplay by: Larry McMurtry, Peter Bogdanovich
Production Design by: Polly Platt
Cinematography by: Robert Surtees
Film Editing by: Donn Cambern, Peter Bogdanovich
Costume Design by: Polly Platt
Art Direction by: Walter Scott Herndon
Distributed by: Columbia Pictures
Release Date: October 22, 1971

All That Jazz (1979)

All That Jazz (1979)

Taglines: All that work. All that glitter. All that pain. All that love. All that crazy rhythm. All that jazz.

Choreographing and picking dancers for his current show whilst editing his feature film about a stand-up comedian is getting to Joe Gideon. Without the chemical substances, he would not have the energy to keep up with his girlfriend, his ex-wife, and his special dancing daughter. They attempt to bring him back from the brink, but it’s too late for his exhausted body and stress-ravaged heart. He chain-smokes, uses drugs, sleeps with his dancers and overworks himself into open-heart surgery. Scenes from his past life start to encroach on the present and he becomes increasingly aware of his mortality.

All That Jazz is a 1979 American musical film directed by Bob Fosse. The screenplay by Robert Alan Aurthur and Fosse is a semi-autobiographical fantasy based on aspects of Fosse’s life and career as dancer, choreographer and director. The film was inspired by Bob Fosse’s manic effort to edit his film Lenny while simultaneously staging the 1975 Broadway musical Chicago. It borrows its title from the Kander and Ebb tune All That Jazz in that production. The film won the Palme d’Or at the 1980 Cannes Film Festival.

About the Story

Joe Gideon is a theater director and choreographer trying to balance work on his latest Broadway musical with editing a Hollywood film he has directed. He is a workaholic who chain-smokes cigarettes, and without a daily dose of Vivaldi, Visine, Alka-Seltzer, Dexedrine, and sex, he wouldn’t have the energy to keep up the biggest “show” of all — his life. His girlfriend Katie Jagger, his ex-wife Audrey Paris, and daughter Michelle try to pull him back from the brink, but it is too late for his exhausted body and stress-ravaged heart. In his imagination, he flirts with an angel of death named Angelique.

Gideon’s condition gets progressively worse. He is rushed to a hospital after experiencing chest pains during a particularly stressful table read (with the penny-pinching backers in attendance) and admitted with severe attacks of angina. Joe brushes off his symptoms, and attempts to leave to go back to rehearsal, but he collapses in the doctor’s office and is ordered to stay in the hospital for three to four weeks to rest his heart and recover from his exhaustion.

The show is postponed, but Gideon continues his antics from the hospital bed, in brazen denial of his mortality. Champagne flows, endless strings of women frolic around his hospital room and the cigarettes are always lit. Cardiogram readings don’t show any improvement as Gideon dances with death. As the negative reviews for his feature film (which has been released without him) come in, Gideon has a massive coronary and is taken straight to coronary artery bypass surgery.

All That Jazz Movie Poster (1979)

All That Jazz (1979)

Directed by: Bob Fosse
Starring: Roy Scheider, Jessica Lange, Leland Palmer, Ann Reinking, Cliff Gorman, Ben Vereen, Michael Tolan, Max Wright, Deborah Geffner
Screenplay by: Robert Alan Aurthur, Bob Fosse
Production Design by: Philip Rosenberg
Cinematography by: Giuseppe Rotunno
Film Editing by: Alan Heim
Costume Design by: Albert Wolsky
Set Decoration by: Gary J. Brink, Edward Stewart
Music by: Ralph Burns
Distributed by: 20th Century Fox, Columbia Pictures
Release Date: December 20, 1979