A Star is Born (1976)

A Star is Born (1976)

Talented rock star John Norman Howard has seen his career begin to decline. Too many years of concerts and managers and life on the road have made him cynical and the monotony has taken its toll. Then he meets the innocent, pure and very talented singer Esther Hoffman. As one of his songs in the movie says “I’m gonna take you girl, I’m gonna show you how.” And he does. He shows Esther the way to stardom while forsaking his own career. As they fall in love, her success only makes his decline even more apparent.

A Star Is Born is a 1976 American musical drama film telling the story of a young woman, played by Barbra Streisand, who enters show business, and meets and falls in love with an established male star, played by Kris Kristofferson, only to find her career ascending while his goes into decline. It is a remake of two earlier versions – the 1937 version was a drama starring Janet Gaynor and Fredric March, and the 1954 version was a musical starring Judy Garland and James Mason.

A Star is Born Movie Poster (1976)

A Star is Born (1976)

Directed by: Frank Pierson
Starring: Barbra Streisand, Kris Kristofferson, Gary Busey, Oliver Clark, Venetta Fields, Clydie King, Marta Heflin, Joanne Linville
Screenplay by: William A. Wellman, Robert Carson
Production Design by: Polly Platt
Cinematography by: Robert Surtees
Film Editing by: Peter Zinner
Costume Design by: Seth Banks, Shirlee Strahm
Set Decoration by: Ruby R. Levitt
Art Direction by: William Hiney
Music by: Roger Kellaway
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: December 8, 1976

Serpico (1973)

Serpico (1973)

Serpico is a cop in the 1960s-early 1970s. Unlike all his colleagues, he refuses a share of the money that the cops routinely extort from local criminals. Nobody wants to work with Serpico, and he’s in constant danger of being placed in life threatening positions by his “partners”. Nothing seems to get done even when he goes to the highest of authorities. Despite the dangers he finds himself in, he still refuses to ‘go with the flow’, in the hope that one day, the truth will be known.

Serpico is a 1973 American neo-noir crime drama film directed by Sidney Lumet and starring Al Pacino. Waldo Salt and Norman Wexler wrote the screenplay, adapting Peter Maas’s biography of NYPD officer Frank Serpico, who went undercover to expose corruption in the police force. Both Maas’s book and the film cover 12 years, 1960 to 1972. The film and principals were nominated for numerous awards, earning recognition for its score, direction, screenplay, and Pacino’s performance. The film was also a commercial success.

About the Story

Working as a uniformed patrolman, Frank Serpico excels at every assignment. He moves on to plainclothes assignments, where he slowly discovers a hidden world of corruption and graft among his own colleagues. After witnessing cops commit violence, take payoffs, and other forms of police corruption, Serpico decides to expose what he has seen, but is harassed and threatened by his peers. His struggle leads to infighting within the police force, problems in his personal relationships, and his life being threatened.

Finally, after being shot in the face during a drug bust on February 3, 1971, he testifies before the Knapp Commission, a government inquiry into NYPD police corruption between 1970 and 1972. After receiving a New York City Police Department Medal of Honor and a disability pension, Serpico resigns from the force and moves to Switzerland.

Serpico Movie Poster (1973)

Serpico (1973)

Directed by: Sidney Lumet
Starring: Al Pacino, John Randolph, Jack Kehoe, Biff McGuire, Barbara Eda-Young, Cornelia Sharpe, Tony Roberts, John Medici, Albert Henderson
Screenplay by: Waldo Salt
Production Design by: Charles Bailey
Cinematography by: Arthur J. Ornitz
Film Editing by: Dede Allen, Richard Marks
Costume Design by: Anna Hill Johnstone
Set Decoration by: Thomas H. Wright
Art Direction by: Douglas Higgins
Music by: Mikis Theodorakis
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: December 5, 1973

The Turning Point (1977)

The Turning Point (1977)

Taglines: The generations change. But the choices remain the same.

The story of two women whose lives are dedicated to ballet. Deedee left her promising dance career to become a wife and mother and now runs a ballet school in Oklahoma. Emma stayed with a company and became a star though her time has nearly passed. Both want what the other has and reflect on missed chances as they are brought together again through Deedee’s daughter, who joins the company.

The Turning Point is a 1977 drama film centered on the world of ballet in New York City, written by Arthur Laurents and directed by Herbert Ross. The film stars Shirley MacLaine and Anne Bancroft, along with Leslie Browne, Mikhail Baryshnikov, and Tom Skerritt. The film was nominated for eleven Academy Awards, including Best Picture. The script is a fictionalized version of the real-life Brown family and the friendship between ballerinas Isabel Mirrow Brown and Nora Kaye.

The Turning Point (1977)

About the Story

DeeDee (Shirley MacLaine) left the ballet company after becoming pregnant by Wayne (Tom Skerritt), another dancer in the company. They marry and later move to Oklahoma City to run a dance studio. Emma (Anne Bancroft) stays with the company and eventually becomes a prima ballerina and well-known figure in the ballet community.

While the company is on tour and performs a show in Oklahoma City, DeeDee and the family go to see the show, and then have an after-party for the company at her home. The reunion stirs up old memories and things begin to unravel.

At the party, DeeDee’s aspiring dancer/daughter, Emilia (Leslie Browne), who is also Emma’s goddaughter, is invited to take class with the company the following day. After taking class with the company, Emilia is asked to join the company but she does not immediately accept the offer as she wants to think it over before making her final decision. DeeDee and Wayne decide that DeeDee should go to New York with Emilia, who is rather shy and doesn’t make friends as easily as her younger sister. Meanwhile, their son, Ethan gets a scholarship to the company’s summer program while Wayne and their other daughter stay in Oklahoma City.

Once in New York, they rent several rooms in Carnegie Hall with Madame Dakharova, a ballet coach. Emilia soon starts a relationship with a Russian playboy in the company, Yuri (Mikhail Baryshnikov). DeeDee runs into the former conductor of the company and has an affair with him, which causes conflict between Emilia and DeeDee. Meanwhile, Emma argues with Arnold, the choreographer, about giving her a better role in his new ballet, which he refuses and leads Emma to suggest Emilia for the role instead.

It’s also revealed Emma has been seeing a married man, Carter. During rehearsal, Emilia has an argument with Arnold and storms out, going to a bar and getting intoxicated. She then shows up for the performance that night still intoxicated and Emma takes care of her, which angers DeeDee. Emilia suffers when she sees Yuri getting involved with another dancer, Carolyn.

The Turning Point (1977)

Directed by: Herbert Ross
Starring: Anne Bancroft, Shirley MacLaine, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Tom Skerritt, Leslie Browne, Martha Scott, Antoinette Sibley, Alexandra Danilova, Lisa Lucas
Screenplay by: Arthur Laurents
Production Design by: Albert Brenner
Cinematography by: Robert Surtees
Film Editing by: William Reynolds
Costume Design by: Albert Wolsky
Set Decoration by: Marvin March
Distributed by: 20th Century Fox
Release Date: November 14, 1977

A Woman Under the Influence (1974)

A Woman Under the Influence (1974)

Los Angeles housewife and mother Mabel loves her construction worker husband Nick and desperately wants to please him, but the strange mannerisms and increasingly odd behavior she displays while in the company of others has him concerned. Convinced she has become a threat to herself and others, he reluctantly commits her to an institution, where she undergoes treatment for six months.

Left alone with his three children, Nick proves to be neither wiser nor better than his wife in the way he relates to and interacts with them or accepts the role society expects him to play.

After six months Mabel returns home but she is not prepared to do so emotionally or mentally, and neither is her husband prepared correctly for her return. At first Nick invites a large group of people to the house for a party to celebrate his wife’s return, but realizing at the last minute that this is foolish, he sends most of them home. Mabel then returns with mostly only close family, including her parents, Nick’s parents, and their three children to greet her but even this is overwhelming and the evening disintegrates into yet another emotionally and psychologically devastating event.

A Woman Under the Influence (1974)

Nick kicks the family out of the house, leaving husband and wife alone. After yet another psychotic episode where Mabel cuts herself, Nick decides to put the children to bed. The youngsters profess their love for their mother as she tucks them in. Nick and Mabel themselves ready their bed for the night as the film ends.

A Woman Under the Influence is a 1974 American drama film written and directed by John Cassavetes. It focuses on a woman whose unusual behavior leads her husband to commit her for psychiatric treatment and the effect this has on their family. It received two Academy Award nominations for Best Actress and Best Director. In 1990, A Woman Under the Influence was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”, one of the first fifty films to be so honored.

A Woman Under the Influence Movie Poster (1974)A Woman Under the Influence Movie Poster (1974)

A Woman Under the Influence (1974)

Directed by: John Cassavetes
Starring: Gena Rowlands, Peter Falk, Fred Draper, Lady Rowlands, Katherine Cassavetes, Matthew Labyorteaux, Christina Grisanti
Screenplay by: John Cassavetes
Cinematography by: Mitch Breit, Al Ruban
Film Editing by: David Armstrong, Sheila Viseltear
Art Direction by: Phedon Papamichael
Music by: Bo Harwood
Distributed by: Cine-Source
Release Date: November 18, 1974

The Sting (1973)

The Sting (1973)

Taglines: …All it takes is a little confidence.

Johnny Hooker and Luther Coleman are `grifters’ or confidence tricksters in 1930s Chicago. Unknown to them, however, one of their victims works for a vicious local gangster named Doyle Lonnegan, and when Lonnegan finds out what has happened he has Luther murdered.

Hooker is not a violent man by nature and admits that he does not know much about killing, but nevertheless wishes to take revenge for his partner’s death. He decides that the best way is to hurt Lonnegan’s pride by relieving him of some of his wealth. He joins forces with another con man named Henry Gondorff, and together they come up with an elaborate plan, not only to cheat Lonnegan, but also to do it in such a way that he never realises that he has been cheated. The plot unfolds with great ingenuity; until the final denouement the audience are never quite sure which developments are for real and which are part of the elaborate scheme.

The Sting is a 1973 American caper film set in September 1936, involving a complicated plot by two professional grifters (Paul Newman and Robert Redford) to con a mob boss (Robert Shaw). The film was directed by George Roy Hill, who had directed Newman and Redford in the western Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Created by screenwriter David S. Ward, the story was inspired by real-life cons perpetrated by brothers Fred and Charley Gondorff and documented by David Maurer in his book The Big Con: The Story of the Confidence Man.

The title phrase refers to the moment when a con artist finishes the “play” and takes the mark’s money. If a con is successful, the mark does not realize he has been “taken” (cheated), at least not until the con men are long gone. The film is played out in distinct sections with old-fashioned title cards, with lettering and illustrations rendered in a style reminiscent of the Saturday Evening Post. The film is noted for its use of ragtime, particularly the melody “The Entertainer” by Scott Joplin, which was adapted for the movie by Marvin Hamlisch (and a top-ten chart single for Hamlisch when released as a single from the film’s soundtrack). The film’s success created a resurgence of interest in Joplin’s work.

The Sting Movie Poster (1973)

The Sting (1973)

Directed by: George Roy Hill
Starring: Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Robert Shaw, Charles Durning, Eileen Brennan, Ray Walston, Harold Gould, Dimitra Arliss
Screenplay by: David S. Ward
Cinematography by: Robert Surtees
Film Editing by: William Reynolds
Costume Design by: Edith Head
Set Decoration by: James W. Payne
Art Direction by: Henry Bumstead
Distributed by: Universal Pictures
Release Date: December 25, 1973

The Three Musketeers (1974)

The Three Musketeers (1974)

Taglines: …One for all and all for fun.

Having learned swordsmanship from his father, the young country bumpkin d’Artagnan arrives in Paris with dreams of becoming a king’s musketeer. Unaccustomed to the city life, he makes a number of clumsy faux pas. First he finds himself insulted, knocked out and robbed by the Comte de Rochefort, an agent of Cardinal Richelieu, and once in Paris comes into conflict with three musketeers, Athos, Porthos, and Aramis, each of whom challenges him to a duel for some accidental insult or embarrassment.

As the first of these duels is about to begin, Jussac arrives with five additional swordsmen of Cardinal Richelieu’s guards. D’Artagnan sides with the musketeers in the ensuing street fight and becomes their ally in opposition to the Cardinal, who wishes to increase his already considerable power over the king, Louis XIII. D’Artagnan also begins an affair with his landlord’s wife, Constance Bonacieux, who is dressmaker to the Queen, Anne of Austria.

Meanwhile the Duke of Buckingham, former lover of the Queen, turns up and asks for something in remembrance of her; she gives him a necklace with twelve settings of diamonds, a gift from her husband. From the Queen’s treacherous lady in waiting, the Cardinal learns of the rendezvous and suggests to the none-too-bright King to throw a ball in his wife’s honor, and request she wear the diamonds he gave her. The Cardinal also sends his agent Milady de Winter to England, who seduces the Duke and steals two of the necklace’s diamonds.

Meanwhile, the Queen has confided her troubles in Constance, who asks d’Artagnan to ride to England and get back the diamonds. D’Artagnan and the three musketeers set out, but on the way the Cardinal’s men attack them. Only d’Artagnan and his servant make it through to Buckingham, where they discover the loss of two of the diamond settings. The Duke replaces the two settings, and d’Artagnan races back to Paris. Porthos, Athos, and Aramis, wounded but not dead as d’Artagnan had feared, aid the delivery of the complete necklace to the Queen, saving the royal couple from the embarrassment which the Cardinal had plotted.

The Three Musketeers (also known as The Three Musketeers: The Queen’s Diamonds) is a 1973 film based on the novel by Alexandre Dumas, père. It was directed by Richard Lester and written by George MacDonald Fraser. It was originally proposed in the 1960s as a vehicle for The Beatles, whom Lester had directed in two other films.

The film adheres closely to the novel, but also injects a fair amount of humor. It was shot by David Watkins, with an eye for period detail. The fight scenes were choreographed by master swordsman William Hobbs.

The Three Musketeers Movie Poster (1974)

The Three Musketeers (1974)

Directed by: Richard Lester
Starring: Oliver Reed, Raquel Welch, Richard Chamberlain, Michael York, Frank Finlay, Geraldine Chaplin, Jean-Pierre Cassel
Screenplay by: George MacDonald Fraser
Production Design by: Brian Eatwell
Cinematography by: David Watkin
Film Editing by: John Victor-Smith
Costume Design by: Yvonne Blake
Art Direction by: Leslie Dilley, Fernando González
Music by: Michel Legrand
Distributed by: 20th Century Fox
Release Date: March 29, 1974

Scent of a Woman (1974)

Scent of a Woman (1974)

An army cadet accompanies an irascible, blind captain on a week-long trip from Turin to Naples. The captain, Fausto, who wants no pity, brooks no disagreement, and charges into every situation, nicknames the youth Ciccio (“Babyfat”), and spends the next few days ordering him about and generally behaving badly in public.

In Rome, Fausto summons a priest to ask for his blessing; in Naples, where Fausto joins a blind lieutenant for drinking and revelry, the two soldiers talk quietly and seriously about “going through with it.” Also in Naples is Sara, in love with Fausto, but treated cruelly by him. What do the blind soldiers plan? Can Sara soften Fausto’s hardened heart?

Scent of a Woman (Italian: Profumo di donna) is a 1974 Commedia all’italiana film directed by Dino Risi, based on Il buio e il miele, a story by Giovanni Arpino. Both Risi and the leading actor Vittorio Gassman won important Italian and French awards. There is also an American remake, Scent of a Woman.

Scent of a Woman Movie Poster (1974)

Scent of a Woman (1974)

Directed by: Dino Risi
Starring: Vittorio Gassman, Alessandro Momo, Agostina Belli, Moira Orfei, Franco Ricci, Elena Veronese, Lorenzo Piani, Stefania Spugnini
Screenplay by: Ruggero Maccari
Production Design by: Lorenzo Baraldi
Cinematography by: Claudio Cirillo
Film Editing by: Alberto Gallitti
Costume Design by: Benito Persico
Music by: Armando Trovajoli
Distributed by: 20th Century Fox
Release Date: December 20, 1974

Scrooge (1970)

Scrooge (1970)

Taglines: What the Dickens have they done to Scrooge?

In 1860, cranky old miser Ebenezer Scrooge hates Christmas; loathes people and defends the decrease of the surplus of poor population; runs his bank exploiting his employee Bob Cratchit and clients, giving a bitter treatment to his own nephew and acquaintances. However, on Christmas Eve, he is visited by the doomed ghost of his former partner Jacob Marley that tells him that three spirits would visit him that night.

The first one, the spirit of Christmas Past, recalls his miserable youth when he lost his only love due to his greed; the spirit of Christmas Present shows him the poor situation of Bob’s family and how joyful life may be; and the spirit of Christmas Future shows his fate. Scrooge finds that life is good and time is too short and suddenly you are not there anymore, changing his behavior toward Christmas, Bob, his nephew and people in general.

Scrooge is a 1970 Technicolor musical film adaptation in Panavision of Charles Dickens’ 1843 story, A Christmas Carol. It was filmed in London between January and May 1970 and directed by Ronald Neame, and starred Albert Finney in the title role. The film’s musical score was composed by Leslie Bricusse, and arranged and conducted by Ian Fraser.

With eleven musical arrangements interspersed throughout (all retaining a traditional British air), the award-winning motion picture is a faithful musical retelling of the original. The film received limited praise, but Albert Finney won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor in a Musical/Comedy in 1971. The film received four Academy Award nominations.

Scrooge Movie Poster (1970)

Scrooge (1970)

Directed by: Ronald Neame
Starring: Albert Finney, Alec Guinness, Edith Evans, David Collings, Anton Rodgers, Suzanne Neve, Paddy Stone, Kay Walsh
Screenplay by: Leslie Bricusse
Production Design by: Terence Marsh
Cinematography by: Oswald Morris
Film Editing by: Peter Weatherley
Costume Design by: Margaret Furse
Art Direction by: Robert Cartwright
Music by: Leslie Bricusse
Distributed by: National General Pictures
Release Date: November 5, 1970

The Conversation (1974)

The Conversation (1974)

Taglines: Harry Caul will go anywhere to bug a private conversation.

Harry Caul is a devout Catholic and a lover of jazz music who plays his saxophone while listening to his jazz records. He is a San Francisco-based electronic surveillance expert who owns and operates his own small surveillance business. He is renowned within the profession as being the best, one who designs and constructs his own surveillance equipment. He is an intensely private and solitary man in both his personal and professional life, which especially irks Stan, his business associate who often feels shut out of what is happening with their work.

This privacy, which includes not letting anyone into his apartment and always telephoning his clients from pay phones is, in part, intended to control what happens around him. His and Stan’s latest job (a difficult one) is to record the private discussion of a young couple meeting in crowded and noisy Union Square.

The Conversation is a 1974 American psychological thriller film written, produced and directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Gene Hackman with supporting roles by John Cazale, Allen Garfield, Cindy Williams, Frederic Forrest, Harrison Ford, Teri Garr and Robert Duvall.

The plot revolves around a surveillance expert and the moral dilemma he faces when his recordings reveal a potential murder. Coppola cited the 1966 film Blowup as a key influence. However, since the film was released to theaters just a few months before Richard Nixon resigned as President, he felt that audiences interpreted the film to be a reaction to the Watergate scandal.

The Conversation won the Palme d’Or at the 1974 Cannes Film Festival.[1] It was nominated for three Academy Awards in 1974 and lost Best Picture to The Godfather Part II, another Francis Ford Coppola film. In 1995, it was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Originally, Paramount Pictures distributed the film worldwide. Paramount retains American rights to this day but international rights are now held by Miramax Films and StudioCanal in conjunction with American Zoetrope.

The Conversation Movie Poster (1974)

The Conversation

Directed by: Francis Ford Coppola
Starring: Gene Hackman, John Cazale, Allen Garfield, Frederic Forrest, Cindy Williams, Elizabeth MacRae, Harrison Ford
Screenplay by: Francis Ford Coppola
Production Design by: Dean Tavoularis
Cinematography by: Bill Butler, Haskell Wexler
Film Editing by: Richard Chew
Costume Design by: Aggie Guerard Rodgers
Set Decoration by: Doug von Koss
Music by: David Shire
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: April 7, 1974

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

Protagonist Alex DeLarge is an “ultraviolent” youth in futuristic Britain. As with all luck, his eventually runs out and he’s arrested and convicted of murder and rape. While in prison, Alex learns of an experimental program in which convicts are programmed to detest violence. If he goes through the program, his sentence will be reduced and he will be back on the streets sooner than expected. But Alex’s ordeals are far from over once he hits the mean streets of Britain that he had a hand in creating.

A Clockwork Orange is a 1971 dystopian crime film adapted, produced, and directed by Stanley Kubrick, based on Anthony Burgess’s 1962 novel A Clockwork Orange. It employs disturbing, violent images to comment on psychiatry, juvenile delinquency, youth gangs, and other social, political, and economic subjects in a dystopian near-future Britain.

Alex (Malcolm McDowell), the main character, is a charismatic, sociopathic delinquent whose interests include classical music (especially Beethoven), rape, and what is termed “ultra-violence.” He leads a small gang of thugs (Pete, Georgie, and Dim), whom he calls his droogs (from the Russian word друг, “friend,” “buddy”). The film chronicles the horrific crime spree of his gang, his capture, and attempted rehabilitation via controversial psychological conditioning. Alex narrates most of the film in Nadsat, a fractured adolescent slang composed of Slavic (especially Russian), English, and Cockney rhyming slang.

The soundtrack to A Clockwork Orange features mostly classical music selections and Moog synthesizer compositions by Wendy Carlos (then known as Walter Carlos). The artwork of the now-iconic poster of A Clockwork Orange was created by Philip Castle with the layout by designer Bill Gold.

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

About the Story

In futuristic London, Alex DeLarge is the leader of his “droogs”, Georgie, Dim and Pete. One night, after getting intoxicated on drug-ladened “milk-plus”, they engage in an evening of “ultra-violence” including a fight with a rival gang led by Billyboy. They drive to the country home of writer F. Alexander and beat him to the point of crippling him for life. Alex then rapes his wife while singing “Singin’ in the Rain”. The next day, while truant from school, Alex is approached by his probation officer Mr. P. R. Deltoid, who is aware of Alex’s activities and cautions him.

Alex’s droogs express discontent with petty crimes and want more equality and high yield thefts, but Alex asserts his authority by attacking them. Later, Alex invades the home of a wealthy “cat-lady” and bludgeons her with a phallic statue while his droogs remain outside. On hearing sirens, Alex tries to flee but Dim smashes a bottle on his face, stunning him and leaving him to be arrested by the police. With Alex in custody, Mr. Deltoid gloats that the woman he attacked died, making Alex a murderer. He is sentenced to 14 years in prison.

Two years into the sentence, Alex eagerly takes up an offer to be a test subject for the Minister of the Interior’s new Ludovico technique, an experimental aversion therapy for rehabilitating criminals within two weeks. Alex is strapped to a chair, injected with drugs, and forced to watch films of sex and violence with his eyes propped open. Alex becomes nauseated by the films, and then recognizes the films are set to music of his favorite composer, Ludwig van Beethoven.

Fearing the technique will make him sick on hearing Beethoven, Alex begs for the end of the treatment. Two weeks later, the Minister demonstrates Alex’s rehabilitation to a gathering of officials. Alex is unable to fight back against an actor that taunts and attacks him, and becomes ill at the sight of a topless woman. The prison chaplain complains Alex has been robbed of his freewill, but the prison governor asserts that the Ludovico technique will cut down crime and alleviate crowding in the prisons.

Alex is let out as a free man, only to find his parents have sold his possessions as restitution to his victims, and have lent out his room. Alex encounters an elderly vagrant that he had attacked years earlier, and the vagrant and his friends attack him. Alex is saved by two policeman, but shocked to find they are his former droogs Dim and Georgie. They beat him up, drive him to the countryside, and nearly drown him before abandoning him. Alex barely makes it to the doorstep of a nearby home before collapsing.

A Clockwork Orange Movie Poster (1971)

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

Directed by: Stanley Kubrick
Starring: Malcolm McDowell, Patrick Magee, Michael Bates, Warren Clarke, Adrienne Corri, Clive Francis, Aubrey Morris, Miriam Karlin
Screenplay by: Stanley Kubrick
Production Design by: John Barry
Cinematography by: John Alcott
Film Editing by: Bill Butler
Costume Design by: Milena Canonero
Art Direction by: Russell Hagg, Peter Sheilds
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: February 2, 1972