Heaven Can Wait (1978)

Heaven Can Wait (1978)

Joe Pendleton is a football quarterback preparing to lead his team to the Superbowl when he is almost killed in an accident. An overanxious angel plucks him to heaven only to discover that he was not ready to die, and that his body has been cremated.

Another body must be found without his death being discovered, and that of a recently murdered millionaire is chosen. His wife and accountant, the murderers, are confused by this development, as he buys the Los Angeles Rams in order to once again quarterback them into the Superbowl. At the same time, he falls in love with an English environmental activist who disapproves of his policies and actions.

Heaven Can Wait is a 1978 American comedy film co-directed by Warren Beatty and Buck Henry. It was the second film adaptation of Harry Segall’s stageplay of the same name, being preceded by Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941).

The film was nominated for nine Academy Awards. The cast reunites Beatty and Julie Christie, who also starred together in the 1971 McCabe & Mrs. Miller and the 1975 Shampoo. A third film adaption of the stageplay was done in 2001, titled Down to Earth.

Heaven Can Wait (1978)

About the Story

Joe Pendleton (Warren Beatty), a backup quarterback for the American football team Los Angeles Rams, is looking forward to leading his team to the Super Bowl. While riding his bicycle through the older west side of tunnel one on Kanan-Dume road in Malibu,[3] he collides with a truck. An over-anxious guardian angel (Buck Henry) on his first assignment plucks Joe out of his body early, in the mistaken belief that his death is imminent, and Pendleton arrives in the afterlife.

Once there, he refuses to believe that his time was up and, upon investigation, the mysterious Mr. Jordan (James Mason) discovers that he is right: he was not destined to die until much later (10:17 am on March 20, 2025, to be exact). Unfortunately, his body has already been cremated, so a new body must be found. After rejecting several possibilities of men who are about to die, Joe is finally persuaded to accept the body of a millionaire industrialist. Leo Farnsworth has just been drugged and drowned in his bathtub by his cheating gold digger wife Julia Farnsworth (Dyan Cannon) and her lover, Farnsworth’s personal secretary, Tony Abbott (Charles Grodin).

Julia and Tony are naturally confused when Leo reappears, alive and well. Leo buys the Los Angeles Rams to lead them to the Super Bowl as their quarterback. To succeed, he must first convince, and then secure the aid of, long-time friend and trainer Max Corkle (Jack Warden) to get his new body in shape. At the same time, he falls in love with an environmental activist, Betty Logan (Julie Christie), who disapproves of Farnsworth’s policies and actions.

With the Rams about to play in the Super Bowl, the characters all face a crisis. Mr. Jordan informs Farnsworth that he must give up this body as well. Farnsworth resists, but hints to Betty that she might someday meet someone else and should think of him. Julia and Abbott continue their murderous plans, and Abbott shoots Farnsworth dead. The Rams are forced to start another quarterback, Tom Jarrett, in the climactic game. A detective, Lt. Krim (Vincent Gardenia), interrogates the suspects while they watch the game on TV. With the help of Corkle, he gets Julia and Abbott to incriminate one another.

Heaven Can WaitMovie Poster (1978)

Heaven Can Wait (1973)

Directed by: Warren Beatty, Buck Henry
Starring: Warren Beatty, James Mason, Julie Christie, Jack Warden, Dyan Cannon, Charles Grodin, Vincent Gardenia, Stephanie Faracy
Screenplay by: Elaine May, Warren Beatty
Production Design by: Paul Sylbert
Cinematography by: William A. Fraker
Film Editing by: Robert C. Jones, Don Zimmerman
Costume Design by: Richard Bruno
Set Decoration by: George Gaines
Art Direction by: Edwin O’Donovan
Music by: Dave Grusin
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: June 28, 1978

I Never Sang for My Father (1970)

I Never Sang for My Father (1970)

Gene Hackman plays a New York professor who wants a change in his life, and plans to get married to his girlfriend and move to California. His mother understands his need to get away, but warns him that moving so far away could be hard on his father. Just before the wedding, the mother dies. Hackman’s sister (who has been disowned by their father for marrying a Jewish man) advises him to live his own life, and not let himself be controlled by their father.

I Never Sang for My Father is a 1970 American film, based on a play by the same name, which tells the story of a widowed college professor who wants to get out from under the thumb of his aging father yet still has regrets about his plan to leave him behind when he remarries and moves to California. It stars Melvyn Douglas, Gene Hackman, Dorothy Stickney, Estelle Parsons, Elizabeth Hubbard, Lovelady Powell and Conrad Bain.

The movie was adapted by Robert Anderson from his play and directed by Gilbert Cates. It was nominated for Academy Awards for Best Actor in a Leading Role (Melvyn Douglas), Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Gene Hackman) and Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium.

I Never Sang for My Father Movie Poster (1970)

I Never Sang for My Father (1970)

Directed by: Gilbert Cates
Starring: Melvyn Douglas, Gene Hackman, Dorothy Stickney, Estelle Parsons, Elizabeth Hubbard, Conrad Bain, Nikki Counselman
Screenplay by: Robert Anderson
Cinematography by: Morris Hartzband, George Stoetzel
Film Editing by: Angelo Ross
Costume Design by: Theoni V. Aldredge
Art Direction by: Hank Aldrich
Music by: Al Gorgoni, Barry Mann
Distributed by: Columbia Pictures
Release Date: October 18, 1970

Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore (1974)

Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974)

Taglines: A picture for anyone who has ever dreamed of a second chance!

When Socorro, New Mexico housewife Alice Hyatt’s uncaring husband Donald is killed in an accident, she decides to have a garage sale, pack what’s left of her meager belongings and take her precocious son Tommy to her childhood hometown of Monterey, California, where she hopes to pursue the singing career she’d abandoned when she married.

Their financial situation forces them to take temporary lodgings in Phoenix, Arizona, where she finds work as a lounge singer in a seedy bar. There she meets the considerably younger and seemingly available Ben, who uses his charm to lure her into a sexual relationship that comes to a sudden end when his wife Rita confronts Alice. Ben breaks into Alice’s apartment while Rita is there and physically assaults her for interfering with his extramarital affair. When Alice tells Ben to calm down, he threatens her also and further smashes up the apartment. Fearing for their safety, Alice and Tommy quickly leave town.

Having spent most of the little money she earned on a new wardrobe, Alice is forced to delay their journey to the West Coast and accept a job as a waitress in Tucson so she can accumulate more cash. At the local diner owned by Mel, she eventually bonds with her fellow servers—independent, no-nonsense, outspoken Flo and quiet, timid, incompetent Vera—and meets divorced local rancher David, who soon realizes the way to Alice’s heart is through Tommy.

Still emotionally wounded from the difficult relationship she had with her uncommunicative husband and the frightening encounter she had with Ben, Alice is hesitant to get involved with another man so quickly. However, she finds out that David is a good influence on Tommy, who has befriended wisecracking, shoplifting, wine-guzzling Audrey, a slightly older girl forced to fend for herself while her mother makes a living as a prostitute.

Alice and David warily fall in love, but their relationship is threatened when Alice objects to his discipline of the perpetually bratty Tommy. The two reconcile, and David offers to sell his ranch and move to Monterey so Alice can try to fulfill her childhood dream of becoming another Alice Faye. In the end, Alice decides to stay in Tucson, coming to the conclusion that she can become a singer anywhere.

Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore is a 1974 American comedy drama film directed by Martin Scorsese and written by Robert Getchell. It stars Ellen Burstyn as a widow who travels with her preteen son across the Southwestern United States in search of a better life, along with Alfred Lutter as her son and Kris Kristofferson as a man they meet along the way. This is Martin Scorsese’s fourth film. The film co-stars Billy “Green” Bush, Diane Ladd, Valerie Curtin, Lelia Goldoni, Lane Bradbury, Vic Tayback, Jodie Foster (in one of her earliest film appearances), and Harvey Keitel.

Ellen Burstyn won the Academy Award for Best Actress and the BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role for her performance, and the film won the BAFTA Award for Best Film.

Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore Movie Poster (1974)

Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore (1974)

Directed by: Martin Scorsese
Starring: Ellen Burstyn, Kris Kristofferson, Mia Bendixsen, Billy Green Bush, Lelia Goldoni, Ola Moore, Harry Northup, Diane Ladd, Valerie Curtin
Screenplay by: Robert Getchell
Production Design by: Toby Carr Rafelson
Cinematography by: Kent L. Wakeford
Film Editing by: Marcia Lucas
Art Department: Edward Aiona, John Sexton
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: December 9, 1974

Opening Night (1977)

Opening Night (1977)

In the film, Broadway actress Myrtle Gordon rehearses for her latest play, about a woman unable to admit that she is aging. When she witnesses the death of an adoring young fan, she begins to confront the personal and professional turmoils she faces in her own life.

Opening Night is a 1977 American drama film written and directed by John Cassavetes, and starring Gena Rowlands, Ben Gazzara, Joan Blondell, Paul Stewart, Zohra Lampert, and Cassavetes.

In common with earlier films, Cassavetes struggled to get Opening Night distributed in the United States. After a number of preview screenings, it opened on December 25, 1977, at the Fox Wilshire Theater, Los Angeles where it played to almost empty houses, and closed in February having never been commercially shown elsewhere. Screenings in New York City that March were similarly ignored. The film was only picked up by an American distributor in 1991, two years after Cassavetes’ death.

In 1978, it was entered into the 28th Berlin International Film Festival, where Gena Rowlands won the Silver Bear for Best Actress. The film was screened out of competition at the 1992 Cannes Film Festival.

Opening Night Movie Poster (1977)

Opening Night (1977)

Directed by: John Cassavetes
Starring: Gena Rowlands, John Cassavetes, Ben Gazzara, Joan Blondell, Paul Stewart, Zohra Lampert, Laura Johnson, John Finnegan, Katherine Cassavetes
Screenplay by: John Cassavetes
Production Design by: Bryan Ryman
Cinematography by: Al Ruban
Film Editing by: Tom Cornwell
Costume Design by: Aleka Corwin
Art Direction by: Brian Ryman
Music by: Bo Harwood
Distributed by: Faces Distribution
Taglines: December 25, 1977

Dog Day Afternoon (1975)

Dog Day Afternoon (1975)

Taglines: Anything can happen during the dog days of summer.

Based upon a real-life story that happened in the early seventies in which the Chase Manhattan Bank in Gravesend, Brooklyn, was held siege by a gay bank robber determined to steal enough money for his male lover to undergo a sex change operation. On a hot summer afternoon, the First Savings Bank of Brooklyn is held up by Sonny and Sal, two down-and-out characters. Although the bank manager and female tellers agree not to interfere with the robbery,

Sonny finds that there’s actually nothing much to steal, as most of the cash has been picked up for the day. Sonny then gets an unexpected phone call from Police Captain Moretti, who tells him the place is surrounded by the city’s entire police force. Having few options under the circumstances, Sonny nervously bargains with Moretti, demanding safe escort to the airport and a plane out of the country in return for the bank employees’ safety.

Dog Day Afternoon is a 1975 American crime drama film directed by Sidney Lumet, written by Frank Pierson and produced by Martin Bregman and Martin Elfand. The film stars Al Pacino, John Cazale, Charles Durning, Chris Sarandon, Penelope Allen, James Broderick, Lance Henriksen and Carol Kane. The title refers to the sultry “dog days” of summer.

The film was inspired by P.F. Kluge’s article “The Boys in the Bank”,[2] which tells a story of a similar robbery of a Brooklyn bank by John Wojtowicz and Salvatore Naturale on August 22, 1972. This article was published in Life in 1972.

The film received critical acclaim upon its September 1975 release by Warner Bros., some of which referred to its anti-establishment tone. Dog Day Afternoon was nominated for several Academy Awards and Golden Globe awards, and won one Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay. In 2009, it was named to the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically or aesthetically” significant and will be preserved in the National Film Archive.

Dog Day Afternoon Movie Poster (1975)

Dog Day Afternoon (1975)

Directed by: Sidney Lumet
Starring: Al Pacino, John Cazale, Penelope Allen, Sully Boyar, Carol Kane, Marcia Jean Kurtz, Amy Levitt, Estelle Omens
Screenplay by: Frank Pierson
Production Design by: Charles Bailey
Cinematography by: Victor J. Kemper
Film Editing by: Dede Allen
Costume Design by: Anna Hill Johnstone
Set Decoration by: Robert Drumheller
Art Direction by: Douglas Higgins
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: September 21, 1975

Being There (1979)

Being There (1979)

Taglines: A story of chance.

A simple-minded gardener named Chance has spent all his life in the Washington D.C. house of an old man. When the man dies, Chance is put out on the street with no knowledge of the world except what he has learned from television. After a run in with a limousine, he ends up a guest of a woman (Eve) and her husband Ben, an influential but sickly businessman. Now called Chauncey Gardner, Chance becomes friend and confidante to Ben, and an unlikely political insider.

Being There is a 1979 American comedy-drama film directed by Hal Ashby. Its screenplay was adapted by Jerzy Kosiński and the uncredited Robert C. Jones from the 1970 novella by Kosiński. The film stars Peter Sellers, Shirley MacLaine, Melvyn Douglas, Richard A. Dysart, Jack Warden, and Richard Basehart.

Douglas won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor and Sellers was nominated for Best Actor. The screenplay won the British Academy Film Award for Best Screenplay and the Writers Guild of America Award for Best Comedy Adapted from Another Medium. It was also nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Screenplay.

The making of the film is portrayed in The Life and Death of Peter Sellers, a biographical film of Sellers’ life. In 2015 the United States Library of Congress selected the film for preservation in the National Film Registry, finding it “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Being There Movie Poster (1979)

Being There (1979)

Directed by: Hal Ashby
Starring: Peter Sellers, Shirley MacLaine, Melvyn Douglas, Jack Warden, Richard Dysart, Denise DuBarry, Richard Basehart
Screenplay by: Jerzy Kosinski
Production Design by: Michael D. Haller
Cinematography by: Caleb Deschanel
Film Editing by: Don Zimmerman
Costume Design by: May Routh
Set Decoration by: Robert R. Benton
Art Direction by: James L. Schoppe
Music by: Johnny Mandel
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: December 19, 1979

Midnight Express (1978)

Midnight Express (1978)

Taglines: Everybody gave up on Billy Hayes — except Billy.

On October 6, 1970 while boarding an international flight out of Istanbul Airport, American Billy Hayes is caught attempting to smuggle 2 kilos of hashish out of the country, the drugs strapped to his body. He is told that he will be released if he cooperates with the authorities in identifying the person who actually sold him the hash. Billy’s troubles really begin when after that assistance, he makes a run for it and is recaptured. He is initially sentenced to just over four years for possession, with no time for the more harsh crime of smuggling.

The prison environment is inhospitable in every sense, with a sadistic prison guard named Hamidou ruling the prison, he who relishes the mental and physical torture he inflicts on the prisoners for whatever reason. Told to trust no one, Billy does befriend a few of the other inmates, namely fellow American Jimmy Booth (in for stealing two candlesticks from a mosque), a Swede named Erich, and one of the senior prisoners having already.

Midnight Express is a 1978 American-British-Turkish prison drama film directed by Alan Parker, produced by David Puttnam and starring Brad Davis, Irene Miracle, Bo Hopkins, Paolo Bonacelli, Paul L. Smith, Randy Quaid, Norbert Weisser, Peter Jeffrey and John Hurt. It is based on Billy Hayes’ 1977 non-fiction book Midnight Express and was adapted into the screenplay by Oliver Stone.

Hayes was a young American student sent to a Turkish prison for trying to smuggle hashish out of Turkey. The film deviates from the book’s accounts of the story – especially in its portrayal of Turks – and some have criticized this version, including Billy Hayes himself. Later, both Stone and Hayes expressed their regret about how Turkish people were portrayed in the film. The film’s title is prison slang for an inmate’s escape attempt.

Midnight Express (1978)

About the Story

On October 6, 1970, while on holiday in Istanbul, Turkey, American college student Billy Hayes straps 2 kg of hashish blocks to his chest. While attempting to board a plane back to the United States with his girlfriend, Billy is arrested by Turkish police on high alert due to fear of terrorist attacks. He is strip-searched, photographed and questioned. After a while, a shadowy American (who is never named, but is nicknamed “Tex” by Billy due to his thick Texan accent) arrives, takes Billy to a police station and translates for Billy for one of the detectives.

On questioning Billy tells them that he bought the hashish from a taxicab driver, and offers to help the police track him down in exchange for his release. Billy goes with the police to a nearby market and points out the cab driver, but when they go to arrest the cabbie, it becomes apparent that the police have no intention of keeping their end of the deal with Billy. He sees an opportunity and makes a run for it, only to get cornered and recaptured by the mysterious American.

During his first night in holding at a local jail, a freezing-cold Billy sneaks out of his cell and steals a blanket. Later that night he is rousted from his cell and brutally beaten by chief guard Hamidou for the blanket theft.

He wakes a few days later in Sağmalcılar Prison, surrounded by fellow Western prisoners Jimmy (an American — in for stealing two candlesticks from a mosque), Max (an English heroin addict) and Erich (a Swede) who help him to his feet. Jimmy tells Billy that the prison is a dangerous place for foreigners like themselves, and that no one can be trusted – not even the young children.

Billy meets with his father, a U.S representative and a Turkish lawyer to discuss what will happen to him. Billy is sent to trial for his case where the angry prosecutor makes a case against him for drug smuggling. The lead judge is sympathetic to Billy and gives him only a four-year sentence for drug possession. Billy and his father are horrified at the outcome but their Turkish lawyer insists that the term is a very good result.

Jimmy tries to encourage Billy to become part of an escape attempt through the prison’s tunnels. Believing he is to be released soon Billy rebuffs Jimmy who goes on to attempt an escape himself being brutally beaten for this. In 1974, Billy’s sentence is overturned by the Turkish High Court in Ankara after a prosecution appeal (the prosecutor originally wished to have him found guilty of smuggling and not the lesser charge of possession), and he is ordered to serve a 30-year-to-life term for his crime.

Billy goes along with a prison-break Jimmy has masterminded. Billy, Jimmy, and Max try to escape through the catacombs below the prison, but their plans are revealed to the prison authorities by fellow-prisoner Rifki. His stay becomes harsh and brutal: terrifying scenes of physical and mental torture follow one another, culminating in Billy having a breakdown. He beats up and nearly kills Rifki.

Following this breakdown, he is sent to the prison’s ward for the insane where he wanders in a daze among the other disturbed and catatonic prisoners. He meets fellow prisoner Ahmet whilst participating in the regular inmate activity of walking in a circle around a pillar. Ahmet claims to be a philosopher from Oxford University and engages him in conversation to which Billy is unresponsive.

Midnight Express Movie Poster (1978)

Midnight Express (1978)

Directed by: Alan Parker
Starring: Brad Davis, Irene Miracle, Bo Hopkins, Paolo Bonacelli, Randy Quaid, Norbert Weisser, Kevork Malikyan, Joe Zammit Cordina
Screenplay by: Oliver Stone
Production Design by: Geoffrey Kirkland
Cinematography by: Michael Seresin
Film Editing by: Gerry Hambling
Costume Design by: Milena Canonero
Art Direction by: Evan Hercules
Music by: Giorgio Moroder
Distributed by: Columbia Pictures
Release Date: October 6, 1978

The Exorcist (1973)

The Exorcist (1973)

Taglines: Now… Open your eyes to…

A visiting actress in Washington, D.C., notices dramatic and dangerous changes in the behavior and physical make-up of her 12-year-old daughter. Meanwhile, a young priest at nearby Georgetown University begins to doubt his faith while dealing with his mother’s terminal sickness. And, book-ending the story, a frail, elderly priest recognizes the necessity for a show-down with an old demonic enemy.

The Exorcist is a 1973 American supernatural horror film directed by William Friedkin, adapted by William Peter Blatty from his 1971 novel of the same name, and starring Ellen Burstyn, Linda Blair, Max von Sydow, and Jason Miller. The book, inspired by the 1949 exorcism of Roland Doe, deals with the demonic possession of a 12-year-old girl and her mother’s attempts to win back her child through an exorcism conducted by two priests. The adaption is relatively faithful to the book, which itself has been commercially successful (hitting the New York Times bestseller list).

The film has had a significant influence on popular culture. Later figures in horror such as Stephen King have praised the work as an influence. Several publications have regarded it one of the best horror films in history. For example, it was named the scariest film of all time by Entertainment Weekly in 1999, by Movies.com in 2010, by viewers of AMC in 2006, and by the editors of Time Out in 2014. In addition, a scene from the film was ranked #3 on Bravo’s The 100 Scariest Movie Moments. In 2010, the Library of Congress selected the film to be preserved as part of its National Film Registry as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”. A new television series is currently in development for Fox.

The Exorcist Movie Poster (1973)

The Exorcist (1973)

Directed by: William Friedkin
Starring: Ellen Burstyn, Max von Sydow, Linda Blair, Jason Miller, Kitty Winn, Peter Masterson, Rudolf Schündler, Gina Petrushka
Screenplay by: William Peter Blatty
Production Design by: Bill Malley
Cinematography by: Owen Roizman
Film Editing by: Norman Gay, Evan A. Lottman
Costume Design by: Joseph Fretwell
Set Decoration by: Jerry Wunderlich
Art Direction by: John Robert Lloyd
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: December 26, 1973

Fiddler on the Roof (1971)

Fiddler on the Roof (1971)

At the beginning of the twentieth century, Jews and Orthodox Christians live in the little village of Anatevka in the pre-revolutionary Russia of the Czars. Among the traditions of the Jewish community, the matchmaker arranges the match and the father approves it. The milkman Reb Tevye is a poor man that has been married for twenty-five years with Golde and they have five daughters. When the local matchmaker Yente arranges the match between his older daughter Tzeitel and the old widow butcher Lazar Wolf, Tevye agrees with the wedding.

However Tzeitel is in love with the poor tailor Motel Kamzoil and they ask permission to Tevye to get married that he accepts to please his daughter. Then his second daughter Hodel (Michele Marsh) and the revolutionary student Perchik decide to marry each other and Tevye is forced to accept. When Perchik is arrested by the Czar troops and sent to Siberia, Hodel decides to leave her family and homeland and travel to Siberia to be with her beloved Perchik.

Fiddler on the Roof is a 1971 American musical comedy-drama film produced and directed by Norman Jewison. It is an adaptation of the 1964 Broadway musical of the same name, with music composed by Jerry Bock, lyrics by Sheldon Harnick, and screenplay by Joseph Stein. The film won three Academy Awards, including one for arranger-conductor John Williams.

It was nominated for several more, including Best Picture, Best Actor for Chaim Topol as Tevye, and Best Supporting Actor for Leonard Frey, who played Mottel Kamzoil the Tailor (both had originally acted in the musical; Topol as Tevye in the London production and Frey in a minor part as Mendel, the rabbi’s son). The decision to cast Topol, instead of Zero Mostel, as Tevye was a somewhat controversial one, as the role had originated with Mostel and he had made it famous. Years later, Jewison explained that he felt Mostel’s larger-than-life personality, while fine on stage, would cause film audiences to see him (i.e., Zero Mostel, the actor) rather than the character of Tevye.

Fiddler on the Roof Movie Poster (1971)

Fiddler on the Roof (1971)

Directed by: Norman Jewison
Starring: Topol, Norma Crane, Leonard Frey, Molly Picon, Rosalind Harris, Michele Marsh, Paul Michael Glaser, Candy Bonstein, Elaine Edwards
Screenplay by: holem Aleichem), Arnold Perl
Production Design by: Robert F. Boyle
Cinematography by: Oswald Morris
Film Editing by: Antony Gibbs, Robert Lawrence
Costume Design by: Joan Bridge, Elizabeth Haffenden
Set Decoration by: Peter Lamont
Music by: Jerry Bock
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: November 3, 1971

M*A*S*H (1970)

M*A*S*H (1970)

Taglines: Goodbye, Farewell, and Amen.

The 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital is stuck in the middle of the Korean war. With little help from the circumstances they find themselves in, they are forced to make their own fun. Fond of practical jokes and revenge, the doctors, nurses, administrators, and soldiers often find ways of making wartime life bearable. Nevertheless, the war goes on.

MASH (stylized as M*A*S*H on the poster art) is a 1970 American satirical black comedy war film directed by Robert Altman and written by Ring Lardner, Jr., based on Richard Hooker’s novel MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors. The picture is the only feature film in the M*A*S*H franchise and became one of the biggest films of the early 1970s for 20th Century Fox.

The film depicts a unit of medical personnel stationed at a Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH) during the Korean War; the subtext is about the Vietnam War. It stars Donald Sutherland, Tom Skerritt, and Elliott Gould, with Sally Kellerman, Robert Duvall, René Auberjonois, Gary Burghoff, Roger Bowen, Michael Murphy, and in his film debut, professional football player Fred Williamson.

The film won Grand Prix du Festival International du Film, later named Palme d’Or, at 1970 Cannes Film Festival. The film went on to receive five Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, and won for Best Adapted Screenplay. The film inspired the popular and critically acclaimed television series M*A*S*H, which ran from 1972 to 1983.

M*A*S*H Movie Poster (1970)

M*A*S*H (1970)

Directed by: Robert Altman
Starring: Donald Sutherland, Elliott Gould, Tom Skerritt, Sally Kellerman, Robert Duvall, Rene Auberjonois, David Arkin
Screenplay by: Ring Lardner Jr.
Cinematography by: Harold E. Stine
Film Editing by: Danford B. Greene
Set Decoration by: Stuart A. Reiss, Walter M. Scott
Art Direction by: Arthur Lonergan, Jack Martin Smith, Michael Friedman
Music by: Johnny Mandel
Distributed by: 20th Century Fox
Release Date: January 25, 1970