Interiors (1978)

Interiors (1978)

Homage to Ingmar Bergman in this family drama involving a fashionable Long Island interior designer who tries to impose her overbearing, critical standards on her husband and her three grown daughters. The film is a realistic look at the relationships among one artistically-oriented family; one daughter is a successful writer; the second is looking for an artistic outlet; and the third is an actress. The mother has been deserted by her husband, their father. She thinks and hopes they may reconcile, but she soon learns that he has other thoughts that circle about a new acquaintance, a woman who has had two husbands and is still lively.

Interiors is a 1978 drama film written and directed by Woody Allen. Featured performers are Kristin Griffith, Mary Beth Hurt, Richard Jordan, Diane Keaton, E. G. Marshall, Geraldine Page, Maureen Stapleton and Sam Waterston.

Page received a BAFTA Film Award for Best Supporting Actress and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress. The film received four other Oscar nominations, two for Allen’s screenplay and direction, one for Stapleton as Best Actress in a Supporting Role and another for Mel Bourne and Daniel Robert for their art direction and set decoration. It is Allen’s first full-fledged film in the drama genre.

About the Story

The film centers around the three children of Arthur (E. G. Marshall), a corporate attorney, and Eve (Geraldine Page), an interior decorator. Renata (Diane Keaton) is a poet whose husband Frederick, a struggling writer, feels eclipsed by her success. Flyn (Kristin Griffith) is a vain actress who is away most of the time filming; the low quality of her films is an object of ridicule behind her back. Joey (Mary Beth Hurt), who is in a relationship with Mike (Sam Waterston), cannot settle on a career, and resents her mother for favoring Renata, while Renata resents their father’s concern over Joey’s lack of direction.

One morning, Arthur unexpectedly announces that he wants a separation from his wife and would like to live alone. Eve, who is clinically depressed and mentally unstable, attempts suicide. The shock of these two events causes a rift between the sisters. Arthur returns from a trip to Greece with Pearl (Maureen Stapleton), a high-spirited and more “normal” woman, whom he intends to marry. His daughters are disturbed that Arthur would disregard Eve’s suicide attempt and find another woman, whom Joey refers to as a “vulgarian”.

Interiors Movie Poster (1978)

Interiors (1978)

Directed by: Woody Allen
Starring: Diane Keaton, Geraldine Page, Kristin Griffith, Mary Beth Hurt, Richard Jordan, Sam Waterston, Missy Hope, Kerry Duffy
Screenplay by: Woody Allen
Production Design by: Mel Bourne
Cinematography by: Gordon Willis
Film Editing by: Ralph Rosenblum
Costume Design by: Joel Schumacher
Set Decoration by: Mario Mazzola, Daniel Robert
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: August 2, 1978

Manhattan (1979)

Manhattan (1979)

Forty-two year old Isaac Davis has a romanticized view of his hometown, New York City, most specifically Manhattan, as channeled through the lead character in the first book he is writing, despite his own Manhattan-based life being more of a tragicomedy. He has just quit his job as a hack writer for a bad television comedy, he, beyond the ten second rush of endorphins during the actual act of quitting, now regretting the decision, especially as he isn’t sure he can live off his book writing career.

He is paying two alimonies, his second ex-wife, Jill Davis, a lesbian, who is writing her own tell-all book of their acrimonious split. The one somewhat positive aspect of his life is that he is dating a young woman named Tracy, although she is only seventeen and still in high school. Largely because of their differences a big part of which is due to their ages, he does not see a long term future with her. His life has the potential to be even more tragicomical when he meets journalist Mary.

Manhattan is a 1979 American romantic comedy-drama film directed by Woody Allen and produced by Charles H. Joffe. The screenplay was written by Allen and Marshall Brickman. Allen co-stars as a twice-divorced 42-year-old comedy writer who dates a 17-year-old girl (Mariel Hemingway) but falls in love with his best friend’s (Michael Murphy) mistress (Diane Keaton). Meryl Streep and Anne Byrne also star.

Manhattan was filmed in black-and-white and 2.35:1 widescreen. The film features music composed by George Gershwin, including Rhapsody in Blue, which inspired the idea behind the film. Allen described the film as a combination of his previous two films, Annie Hall and Interiors.

The film was met with widespread critical acclaim and was nominated for two Academy Awards: Best Supporting Actress for Hemingway and Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen for Allen and Brickman. Its North American box office receipts of $39.9 million made it Allen’s second biggest box office hit (after adjusting for inflation). Often considered one of Allen’s best films,[4][5] it ranks 46th on AFI’s 100 Years…100 Laughs list and number 63 on Bravo’s “100 Funniest Movies”. In 2001, the United States Library of Congress deemed the film “culturally significant” and selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry.

Manhattan Movie Poster (1979)

Manhattan (1979)

Directed by: Woody Allen
Starring: Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Mariel Hemingway, Michael Murphy, Meryl Streep, Anne Byrne Hoffman, Karen Ludwig, Tisa Farrow
Screenplay by: Woody Allen, Marshall Brickman
Production Design by: Mel Bourne
Cinematography by: Gordon Willis
Film Editing by: Susan E. Morse
Costume Design by: Albert Wolsky
Set Decoration by: Robert Drumheller
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: April 25, 1979

The Godfather Part II (1974)

The Godfather Part II (1974)

The continuing saga of the Corleone crime family tells the story of a young Vito Corleone growing up in Sicily and in 1910s New York; and follows Michael Corleone in the 1950s as he attempts to expand the family business into Las Vegas, Hollywood and Cuba.

The Godfather Part II is a 1974 American epic crime film produced and directed by Francis Ford Coppola from a screenplay co-written with Mario Puzo, starring Al Pacino and Robert De Niro. Partially based on Puzo’s 1969 novel The Godfather, the film is both sequel and prequel to The Godfather, presenting parallel dramas: one picks up the 1958 story of Michael Corleone (Al Pacino), the new Don of the Corleone crime family, protecting the family business in the aftermath of an attempt on his life; the prequel covers the journey of his father, Vito Corleone (Robert De Niro), from his Sicilian childhood to the founding of his family enterprise in New York City.

An Oscar winner for Best Picture, the film received widespread acclaim from critics, with some deeming it superior to the 1972 original. Nominated for eleven Academy Awards and the first sequel to win for Best Picture, its six Oscars included Best Director for Coppola, Best Supporting Actor for De Niro and Best Adapted Screenplay for Coppola and Puzo. Pacino won the BAFTA Award for Best Actor and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor.

Both this film and its predecessor remain highly influential films in the gangster genre. In 1997, the American Film Institute ranked it as the 32nd-greatest film in American film history and it kept its rank 10 years later. It was selected for preservation in the U.S. National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in 1993, being deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

The Godfather Part II Movie Poster (1974)

The Godfather Part II (1974)

Directed by: Francis Ford Coppola
Starring: Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Robert Duvall, Diane Keaton, Talia Shire, John Cazale, Lee Strasberg, Francesca De Sapio
Screenplay by: Francis Ford Coppola, Mario Puzo
Production Design by: Dean Tavoularis
Cinematography by: Gordon Willis
Film Editing by: Barry Malkin, Richard Marks, Peter Zinner
Costume Design by: Theadora Van Runkle
Set Decoration by: George R. Nelson
Music by: Nino Rota
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: December 20, 1974

Annie Hall (1977)

Annie Hall (1977)

Alvy Singer, a forty year old twice divorced, neurotic, intellectual Jewish New York stand-up comic, reflects on the demise of his latest relationship, to Annie Hall, an insecure, flighty, Midwestern WASP aspiring nightclub singer.

Unlike his previous relationships, Alvy believed he may have worked out all the issues in his life through fifteen years of therapy to make this relationship with Annie last, among those issues being not wanting to date any woman that would want to date him, and thus subconsciously pushing those women away. Alvy not only reviews the many ups and many downs of their relationship, but also reviews the many facets of his makeup that led to him starting to date Annie. Those facets include growing up next to Coney Island in Brooklyn, being attracted to the opposite sex for as long as he can remember, and enduring years of Jewish guilt with his constantly arguing parents.

Annie Hall is a 1977 American romantic comedy film directed by Woody Allen from a screenplay he co-wrote with Marshall Brickman. Produced by Allen’s manager, Charles H. Joffe, the film stars the director as Alvy “Max” Singer, who tries to figure out the reasons for the failure of his relationship with the film’s eponymous female lead, played by Diane Keaton in a role written specifically for her.

Principal photography for the film began on May 19, 1976 on the South Fork of Long Island, and filming continued periodically for the next ten months. Allen has described the result, which marked his first collaboration with cinematographer Gordon Willis, as “a major turning point”, in that unlike the farces and comedies that were his work to that point, it introduced a new level of seriousness. Academics have noted the contrast in the settings of New York City and Los Angeles, the stereotype of gender differences in sexuality, the presentation of Jewish identity, and the elements of psychoanalysis and modernism.

Annie Hall was screened at the Los Angeles Film Festival in March 1977, before its official release on April 20, 1977. The film received widespread critical acclaim, and along with winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, it received Oscars in three other categories: two for Allen (Best Director and, with Brickman, Best Original Screenplay), and Keaton for Best Actress. The film additionally won four BAFTA awards and a Golden Globe, the latter being awarded to Keaton.

Its North American box office receipts of $38,251,425 are fourth-best in the director’s oeuvre when not adjusted for inflation. Often listed among the greatest film comedies, it ranks 31st on AFI’s list of the top feature films in American cinema, fourth on their list of top comedy films and number 28 on Bravo’s “100 Funniest Movies.” Film critic Roger Ebert called it “just about everyone’s favorite Woody Allen movie”. The film has been named the funniest screenplay by the Writers Guild of America in its list of the “101 Funniest Screenplays.”

Annie Hall Movie Poster (1977)

Annie Hall (1977)

Directed by: Woody Allen
Starring: Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Tony Roberts, Paul Simon, Carol Kane, Shelley Duvall, Janet Margolin, Colleen Dewhurst, Christopher Walken
Screenplay by: Woody Allen, Marshall Brickman
Cinematography by: Gordon Willis
Film Editing by: Wendy Greene Bricmont
Costume Design by: Ruth Morley
Set Decoration by: Robert Drumheller, Justin Scoppa Jr.
Art Direction by: Mel Bourne
Distributed by: United Artists
Release Date: April 20, 1977

The Godfather (1972)

The Godfather (1972)

Taglines: An offer you can’t refuse.

When the aging head of a famous crime family decides to transfer his position to one of his subalterns, a series of unfortunate events start happening to the family, and a war begins between all the well-known families leading to insolence, deportation, murder and revenge, and ends with the favorable successor being finally chosen.

The Godfather is a 1972 American crime film directed by Francis Ford Coppola and produced by Albert S. Ruddy, based on Mario Puzo’s best-selling novel of the same name. It stars Marlon Brando and Al Pacino as the leaders of a fictional New York crime family. The story, spanning 1945 to 1955, chronicles the family under the patriarch Vito Corleone, focusing on the transformation of Michael Corleone (Pacino) from reluctant family outsider to ruthless Mafia boss.

Paramount Pictures obtained the rights to the novel before it gained popularity for the price of $80,000. Studio executives had trouble finding a director, as their first few candidates turned down the position. They and Coppola disagreed over who would play several characters, in particular Vito and Michael. Filming was done on location and completed earlier than scheduled. The musical score was composed primarily by Nino Rota with additional pieces by Carmine Coppola.

The film was the highest-grossing film of 1972 and was for a time the highest grossing film ever made. It won the Oscars for Best Picture, Best Actor (Brando) and Best Adapted Screenplay (for Puzo and Coppola). Its seven other Oscar nominations included Pacino, James Caan and Robert Duvall for Best Supporting Actor and Coppola for Best Director. It was followed by sequels The Godfather Part II (1974) and Part III (1990).

The Godfather is widely regarded as one of the greatest films in world cinema and one of the most influential, especially in the gangster genre. It was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry in 1990 and is ranked the second greatest film in American cinema (behind Citizen Kane) by the American Film Institute.

The Godfather Movie Poster (1972)

The Godfather

Directed by: Francis Ford Coppola
Starring: Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, James Caan, Richard S. Castellano, Robert Duvall, Diane Keaton, Talia Shire
Screenplay by: Francis Ford Coppola, Mario Puzo
Production Design by: Dean Tavoularis
Cinematography by: Gordon Willis
Film Editing by: William Reynolds, Peter Zinner
Costume Design by: Anna Hill Johnstone
Set Decoration by: Philip Smith
Music by: Nino Rota
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: March 24, 1972 (United States)