Superman (1978)

Superman (1978)

Just before the destruction of the planet Krypton, scientist Jor-El sends his infant son Kal-El on a spaceship to Earth. Raised by kindly farmers Jonathan and Martha Kent, young Clark discovers the source of his superhuman powers and moves to Metropolis to fight evil. As Superman, he battles the villainous Lex Luthor, while, as novice reporter Clark Kent, he attempts to woo co-worker Lois Lane.

Superman (marketed as Superman: The Movie) is a 1978 superhero film directed by Richard Donner. It is based on the DC Comics character of the same name and stars Marlon Brando, Gene Hackman, Christopher Reeve, Margot Kidder, Glenn Ford, Phyllis Thaxter, Jackie Cooper, Trevor Howard, Marc McClure, Terence Stamp, Valerie Perrine, and Ned Beatty. The film depicts Superman’s origin, including his infancy as Kal-El of Krypton and his youthful years in the rural town of Smallville. Disguised as reporter Clark Kent, he adopts a mild-mannered disposition in Metropolis and develops a romance with Lois Lane, while battling the villainous Lex Luthor.

Several directors, most notably Guy Hamilton, and screenwriters (Mario Puzo, David and Leslie Newman, and Robert Benton), were associated with the project before Donner was hired to direct. Tom Mankiewicz was drafted in to rewrite the script and was given a “creative consultant” credit. It was decided to film both Superman and Superman II simultaneously, with principal photography beginning in March 1977 and ending in October 1978. Tensions arose between Donner and the producers, and a decision was made to stop filming the sequel—of which 75 percent had already been completed—and finish the first film.

The most expensive film made up to that point, with a budget of $55 million, Superman was released in December 1978 to critical acclaim and financial success, earning $300 million during its original theatrical run. Reviewers particularly praised Reeve’s performance. It was nominated for three Academy Awards including Best Film Editing, Best Music (Original Score), and Best Sound Mixing, and received a Special Achievement Academy Award for Visual Effects. Groundbreaking in its use of special effects and science fiction/fantasy storytelling, the film’s legacy presaged the mainstream popularity of Hollywood’s superhero film franchises.

Superman (1978) Movie Poster

Superman (1078)

Directed by: Richard Donner
Btarring: Christopher Reeve, Margot Kidder, Gene Hackman, Marlon Brando, Ned Beatty, Jackie Cooper, Glenn Ford, Trevor Howard
Screenplay by: Mario Puzo, David Newman, Leslie Newman
Production Design by: John Barry
Cinematography by: Geoffrey Unsworth
Film Editing by: Stuart Baird, Michael Ellis
Costume Design by: Yvonne Blake
Set Decoration by: Peter Howitt
Music by: John Williams
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: December 15, 1978

Bite the Bullet (1975)

Bite the Bullet (1975)

Based on actual events of the early twentieth century, the story concerns a grueling 700-mile cross-country horse race in 1906 and the way it affects the lives of its various participants.

The colorful contestants include two former Rough Riders (Hackman and Coburn) who can’t let friendship come between them if they intend to win, a lady of little virtue (Bergen), a punk kid (Vincent), an old cowhand in poor health (Johnson), an English gentleman (Bannen) who’s competing just for the sheer sport of it all, and a Mexican with a toothache (Mario Arteaga) who literally needs to bite the bullet. All must race against a thoroughbred of championship pedigree owned by a wealthy man (Coleman) who has no intention of seeing his entry lose.

The film touches on the themes of sportsmanship, animal cruelty, the yellow press, racism, the end of the Old West and the bonds of marriage and friendship. As the race progresses, the conditions test not only the endurance of horses and riders but also their philosophies of life and the meaning of victory and defeat.

Bite the Bullet is a 1975 American Western film written and directed by Richard Brooks and starring Gene Hackman, James Coburn, Candice Bergen, Ben Johnson, Ian Bannen, Jan-Michael Vincent and Dabney Coleman.

Bite the Bullet (1975) Movie Poster

Bite the Bullet (1975)

Directed by: Richard Brooks
Starring: Gene Hackman, Candice Bergen, James Coburn, Ben Johnson, Ian Bannen, Jan-Michael Vincent, Robert Donner, Jean Willes
Screenplay by: Richard Brooks
Cinematography by: Harry Stradling Jr.
Film Editing by: George Grenville
Set Decoration by: Bob Signorelli
Art Direction by: Robert F. Boyle
Music by: Alex North
Distributed by: Columbia Pictures
Release Date: May 6, 1975

The Conversation (1974)

The Conversation (1974)

Taglines: Harry Caul will go anywhere to bug a private conversation.

Harry Caul is a devout Catholic and a lover of jazz music who plays his saxophone while listening to his jazz records. He is a San Francisco-based electronic surveillance expert who owns and operates his own small surveillance business. He is renowned within the profession as being the best, one who designs and constructs his own surveillance equipment. He is an intensely private and solitary man in both his personal and professional life, which especially irks Stan, his business associate who often feels shut out of what is happening with their work.

This privacy, which includes not letting anyone into his apartment and always telephoning his clients from pay phones is, in part, intended to control what happens around him. His and Stan’s latest job (a difficult one) is to record the private discussion of a young couple meeting in crowded and noisy Union Square.

The Conversation is a 1974 American psychological thriller film written, produced and directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Gene Hackman with supporting roles by John Cazale, Allen Garfield, Cindy Williams, Frederic Forrest, Harrison Ford, Teri Garr and Robert Duvall.

The plot revolves around a surveillance expert and the moral dilemma he faces when his recordings reveal a potential murder. Coppola cited the 1966 film Blowup as a key influence. However, since the film was released to theaters just a few months before Richard Nixon resigned as President, he felt that audiences interpreted the film to be a reaction to the Watergate scandal.

The Conversation won the Palme d’Or at the 1974 Cannes Film Festival.[1] It was nominated for three Academy Awards in 1974 and lost Best Picture to The Godfather Part II, another Francis Ford Coppola film. In 1995, it was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Originally, Paramount Pictures distributed the film worldwide. Paramount retains American rights to this day but international rights are now held by Miramax Films and StudioCanal in conjunction with American Zoetrope.

The Conversation Movie Poster (1974)

The Conversation

Directed by: Francis Ford Coppola
Starring: Gene Hackman, John Cazale, Allen Garfield, Frederic Forrest, Cindy Williams, Elizabeth MacRae, Harrison Ford
Screenplay by: Francis Ford Coppola
Production Design by: Dean Tavoularis
Cinematography by: Bill Butler, Haskell Wexler
Film Editing by: Richard Chew
Costume Design by: Aggie Guerard Rodgers
Set Decoration by: Doug von Koss
Music by: David Shire
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: April 7, 1974

I Never Sang for My Father (1970)

I Never Sang for My Father (1970)

Gene Hackman plays a New York professor who wants a change in his life, and plans to get married to his girlfriend and move to California. His mother understands his need to get away, but warns him that moving so far away could be hard on his father. Just before the wedding, the mother dies. Hackman’s sister (who has been disowned by their father for marrying a Jewish man) advises him to live his own life, and not let himself be controlled by their father.

I Never Sang for My Father is a 1970 American film, based on a play by the same name, which tells the story of a widowed college professor who wants to get out from under the thumb of his aging father yet still has regrets about his plan to leave him behind when he remarries and moves to California. It stars Melvyn Douglas, Gene Hackman, Dorothy Stickney, Estelle Parsons, Elizabeth Hubbard, Lovelady Powell and Conrad Bain.

The movie was adapted by Robert Anderson from his play and directed by Gilbert Cates. It was nominated for Academy Awards for Best Actor in a Leading Role (Melvyn Douglas), Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Gene Hackman) and Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium.

I Never Sang for My Father Movie Poster (1970)

I Never Sang for My Father (1970)

Directed by: Gilbert Cates
Starring: Melvyn Douglas, Gene Hackman, Dorothy Stickney, Estelle Parsons, Elizabeth Hubbard, Conrad Bain, Nikki Counselman
Screenplay by: Robert Anderson
Cinematography by: Morris Hartzband, George Stoetzel
Film Editing by: Angelo Ross
Costume Design by: Theoni V. Aldredge
Art Direction by: Hank Aldrich
Music by: Al Gorgoni, Barry Mann
Distributed by: Columbia Pictures
Release Date: October 18, 1970

The French Connection (1971)

The French Connection (1971)

William Friedkin’s gritty police drama portrays two tough New York City cops trying to intercept a huge heroin shipment coming from France. An interesting contrast is established between ‘Popeye’ Doyle, a short-tempered alcoholic bigot who is nevertheless a hard-working and dedicated police officer, and his nemesis Alain Charnier, a suave and urbane gentleman who is nevertheless a criminal and one of the largest drug suppliers of pure heroin to North America. During the surveillance and eventual bust, Friedkin provides one of the most gripping and memorable car chase sequences ever filmed.

The French Connection is a 1971 American dramatic thriller film directed by William Friedkin and produced by Philip D’Antoni. It stars Gene Hackman, Fernando Rey, and Roy Scheider. The film was adapted and fictionalized by Ernest Tidyman from the 1969 non-fiction book by Robin Moore. It tells the story of New York Police Department detectives, “Popeye” Doyle and Buddy “Cloudy” Russo, whose real-life counterparts were Narcotics Detectives Eddie Egan and Sonny Grosso. Don Ellis scored the film.

It was the first R-rated movie to win the Academy Award for Best Picture since the introduction of the MPAA film rating system. It also won Academy Awards for Best Actor (Gene Hackman), Best Director (William Friedkin), Best Film Editing, and Best Adapted Screenplay (Ernest Tidyman). It was nominated for Best Supporting Actor (Roy Scheider), Best Cinematography and Best Sound Mixing. Tidyman also received a Golden Globe Award nomination, a Writers Guild of America Award and an Edgar Award for his screenplay. A sequel, French Connection II, followed in 1975 with Gene Hackman and Fernando Rey reprising their roles.

The American Film Institute included the film in its list of the best American films in 1998 and again in 2007. In 2005, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

The French Connection Movie Poster (1971)

The French Connection (1971)

Directed by: William Friedkin
Starring: Gene Hackman, Roy Scheider, Fernando Rey, Tony Lo Bianco, Marcel Bozzuffi, Ann Rebbot, Arlene Farber, Sonny Grosso
Screenplay by: Ernest Tidyman
Cinematography by: Owen Roizman
Film Editing by: Gerald B. Greenberg
Costume Design by: Joseph Fretwell
Set Decoration by: Edward Garzero
Music by: Don Ellis
Distributed by: 20th Century Fox
Release Date: October 9, 1971