Klute (1971)

Klute (1971)

Taglines: Lots of guys swing with a call girl like Bree. One guy just wants to kill her.

Six months after the disappearance of Tuscarora, PA businessman Tom Gruneman, his boss, Peter Cable, and his wife, Holly Gruneman, hire Tom’s best friend, private detective John Klute to find out what happened to Tom, as the police have been unable to do so, and despite John having no expertise in missing persons cases. The only lead is a typewritten obscene letter Tom purportedly sent to Manhattan actress / model / call girl Bree Daniel, who admits to having received such letters from someone, and since having received several obscene telephone calls as well.

The suggestion/belief is that Tom was one of Bree’s past johns, although she has no recollection of him when shown his photograph. Bree tricking is more a compulsion than a financial need. In their initial encounters, John and Bree do whatever they can to exert their psychological dominance over the other, especially as Bree initially refused to even speak to him.

Klute (1971) - Jane Fonda

Klute is a 1971 crime-thriller film directed and produced by Alan J. Pakula, written by Andy and Dave Lewis, and starring Jane Fonda, Donald Sutherland, Charles Cioffi, and Roy Scheider. It tells the story of a high-priced prostitute who assists a detective in solving a missing person’s case.

Klute is the first installment of what informally came to be known as Pakula’s “paranoia trilogy”. The other two films in the trilogy are The Parallax View (1974) and All The President’s Men (1976).

The film includes a cameo appearance by Warhol superstars actress Candy Darling, and another by All in the Family costar Jean Stapleton. The music was composed by Michael Small. Jane Fonda won the Academy Award for Best Actress for her role in the film.

Klute Movie Poster (1971)

Klute (1971)

Directed by: Alan J. Pakula
Starring: Jane Fonda, Donald Sutherland, Charles Cioffi, Roy Scheider, Dorothy Tristan, Rita Gam, Nathan George, Vivian Nathan
Screenplay by: Andy Lewis, David E. Lewis
Cinematography by: Gordon Willis
Film Editing by: Carl Lerner
Costume Design by: Ann Roth
Set Decoration by: John Mortensen
Art Direction by: George Jenkins
Music by: Michael Small
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: June 25, 1971

Julia (1977)

Julia (1977)

From “Pentimento,” the memoirs of late playwright Lillian Hellman, JULIA covers those years in the 1930s when Lillian attained fame with the production of her first play “The Children’s Hour” on Broadway. Not surprisingly, it centers on Lillian’s relationship with her lifelong friend, Julia. It is a relationship that goes beyond mere acquaintance and one for which the word “love” seems appropriate.

While Julia attends the University in Vienna, studying with such luminaries as Sigmund Freud and Albert Einstein, Lillian suffers through revisions of her play with her mentor and sometimes lover Dashiell Hammett at a New England beach house. After becoming a celebrated playwright, Lillian is invited to a writers’ conference in Russia. Julia, having taken up the battle against fascism, enlists Lillian to smuggle money through Nazi Germany which will assist in the Anti-Fascist cause. It is a dangerous mission especially for a Jewish intellectual on her way to communist Russia. During a brief…

Julia is a 1977 drama film directed by Fred Zinnemann, from a screenplay by Alvin Sargent. It is based on Lillian Hellman’s book Pentimento, a chapter of which purports to tell the story of her relationship with an alleged lifelong friend, “Julia,” who fought against the Nazis in the years prior to World War II. The film in DeLuxe Color was produced by Richard Roth, with Julien Derode as executive producer and Tom Pevsner as associate producer.

Julia was received positively from the critics and was nominated for eleven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director for Fred Zinnemann and Best Actress for Jane Fonda. It ended up winning three awards, Best Supporting Actor for Jason Robards, Best Supporting Actress for Vanessa Redgrave, and Best Adapted Screenplay for Alvin Sargent’s script. Julia was the first film to win both supporting actor categories since The Last Picture Show six years earlier in 1971, and would be followed by Hannah and Her Sisters nine years later in 1986.

Julia Movie Poster (1977)

Julia (1977)

Directed by: Fred Zinnemann
Starring: Jane Fonda, Vanessa Redgrave, Jason Robards, Maximilian Schell, Hal Holbrook, Rosemary Murphy, Meryl Streep, Lisa Pelikan, John Glover
Screenplay by: Lillian Hellman
Production Design by: Gene Callahan, Carmen Dillon, Willy Holt
Cinematography by: Douglas Slocombe
Film Editing by: Marcel Durham, Walter Murch
Costume Design by: Anthea Sylbert
Music by: Georges Delerue
Distributed by: 20th Century Fox
Release Date: October 2, 1977

The China Syndrome (1978)

The China Syndrome (1979)

Taglines: Today, only a handful of people know what it means… Soon you will know.

While visiting the (fictional) Ventana nuclear power plant outside Los Angeles, television news reporter Kimberly Wells (Jane Fonda), her cameraman Richard Adams (Michael Douglas) and their soundman Hector Salas witness the plant going through an emergency shutdown (SCRAM). Shift Supervisor Jack Godell (Jack Lemmon) notices an unusual vibration while grabbing his cup of coffee which he had set down. He then finds that a gauge is misreading and that the coolant is dangerously low (he thought it was overflowing). The crew manages to bring the reactor under control and can be seen celebrating and expressing relief.

Richard surreptitiously films the incident, despite being requested to not film the control room for security purposes. Kimberly’s superior at work (Donat) refuses to permit her to report what happened or show the film, disgusting Richard, who steals the footage. He shows it to experts, who conclude that the plant came perilously close to the China Syndrome in which the core would have melted down into the earth, hitting groundwater and contaminating the surrounding area with radioactive steam.

During an inspection of the plant before it’s brought back online, Godell discovers a puddle of radioactive water that has apparently leaked from a pump. Godell pushes to delay restarting the plant, but the plant superintendent denies his request and appears willing to let nothing stand in the way of the scheduled restart of the plant.

Godell investigates further and finds that a series of radiographs supposedly taken to verify the integrity of welds on the leaking pump are identical – the contractor simply kept submitting the same picture. He believes that the plant is unsafe and could be severely damaged if another full-power SCRAM occurs. He tries to bring the evidence to plant manager Herman DeYoung (Brady), who brushes off Godell as paranoid and states that new radiographs would cost at least $20 million. Godell confronts D.B. Royce, an employee of Foster-Sullivan, the construction company who built the plant, as it was Royce who signed off on the welding radiographs. Godell threatens to go to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, but Royce threatens him; and later a pair of goons from Foster-Sullivan parks outside his house.

Kimberly also defies her bosses, determined to pursue the truth. She and Richard confront Godell at his home with what they know, and he voices his concern about the vibration he felt during the SCRAM and his anger about the false radiographs. Kimberly and Richard ask if he’ll testify at the NRC hearings, being held at Point Conception, where Foster-Sullivan is looking to build another nuclear plant. Godell agrees to obtain for them, through Hector, a set of the false radiographs to take to the hearings.

The China Syndrome is a 1979 American thriller film that tells the story of a television reporter and her cameraman who discover safety coverups at a nuclear power plant. It stars Jane Fonda, Jack Lemmon, and Michael Douglas, with Douglas also serving as the film’s producer.

The cast features Scott Brady, James Hampton, Peter Donat, Richard Herd and Wilford Brimley. The film was directed by James Bridges and written by Bridges, Mike Gray and T. S. Cook.

It was nominated for Academy Awards for Best Actor in a Leading Role (Lemmon), Best Actress in a Leading Role (Fonda), Best Art Direction-Set Decoration (George Jenkins, Arthur Jeph Parker) and Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen.[3] It was also nominated for the Palme d’Or (Golden Palm) at the 1979 Cannes Film Festival, and Lemmon won Best Actor for his performance.[4] The film’s script won the 1980 Writers Guild of America award.[5]

The film was released on March 16, 1979, 12 days before the Three Mile Island nuclear accident in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, which gave the film’s subject matter an unexpected prescience. Coincidentally, in one scene, physicist Dr. Elliott Lowell (Donald Hotton) says that the China Syndrome would render “an area the size of Pennsylvania” permanently uninhabitable.

“China syndrome” is a fanciful term—not intended to be taken literally—that describes a fictional result of a nuclear meltdown, where reactor components melt through their containment structures and into the underlying earth, “all the way to China.”

The China Syndrome Movie Poster (1979)

The China Syndrome (1979)

Directed by: James Bridges
Starring: Jane Fonda, Jack Lemmon, Michael Douglas, Scott Brady, James Hampton, Wilford Brimley, Richard Herd, Michael Alaimo
Screenplay by: Mike Gray
Production Design by: George Jenkins
Cinematography by: James Crabe
Film Editing by: David Rawlins
Costume Design by: Donfeld
Set Decoration by: Arthur Jeph Parker
Distributed by: Columbia Pictures
Release Date: March 16, 1979

Coming Home (1978)

Coming Home (1978)

Sally Bender is the wife of a Captain in the United States Marine Corps. He is sent over to Vietnam, and Sally is alone. With nothing else to do, she decides to volunteer at a local veteran’s hospital, where she meets Luke, who went to high school with Sally. Luke was wounded and is paralyzed and confined to a wheelchair. When Sally begins to fall in love with Luke, she has to make a crucial decision about her life.

Coming Home is a 1978 drama film directed by Hal Ashby and starring Jane Fonda, Jon Voight and Bruce Dern. The screenplay by Waldo Salt and Robert C. Jones was from a story by Nancy Dowd. The plot follows the drama between a young woman, her Marine husband and the paralyzed Vietnam War veteran she meets while her husband is overseas. Fonda and Voight won Academy Awards for their performances.

About the Story

In the spring of 1968 in California, Sally (Jane Fonda), a loyal and conservative military wife, is married to Bob Hyde (Bruce Dern), a captain in the United States Marine Corps who is about to be deployed to Vietnam. As a dedicated military officer, Bob sees it primarily as an opportunity for progress. At first, Sally dreads being left alone, but after a while she feels liberated. Forced to find housing off the base she moves into a new apartment by the beach and buys a sports car.

With nothing else to do, she decides to volunteer at a local veterans’ hospital. This, in part, is motivated by her bohemian friend Vi Munson (Penelope Milford), whose brother Billy has come home after just two weeks in Vietnam with grave emotional problems and now resides in the VA hospital.

At the hospital, Sally meets Luke Martin (Jon Voight), a former high school classmate. Like his friend Billy (Robert Carradine), Luke had gone to Vietnam but come back wounded. He is recuperating at the hospital from the injuries he sustained in the Vietnam War and which left him a paraplegic. Filled with pain, anger, and frustration, Luke is now opposed to the war. Luke at first is a bitter young man, but as he is increasingly thrown into contact with Sally, a relationship starts to develop.

Eventually, Luke is released from the hospital, and, newly mobile with his own wheelchair, begins to rebuild his life. His relationship with Sally deepens. She is also transformed by him and her outlook on life starts to change. They have happy times, play at the beach, and the two fall in love. Meanwhile, Billy, traumatized by his experiences at war, commits suicide by injecting air into his veins. After Billy’s suicide, Luke has only one obsession: do anything to stop sending young men off to war.

Coming Home Movie Poster (1978)

Coming Home

Directed by: Hal Ashby
Starring: Jane Fonda, Jon Voight, Bruce Dern, Penelope Milford, Robert Carradine, Mary Gregory, Kathleen Miller
Screenplay by: Waldo Salt, Robert C. Jones
Cinematography by: Haskell Wexler
Film Editing by: Don Zimmerman
Distributed by United Artists
Release Date: February 15, 1978