Deliverance (1972)

Deliverance (1972)

Taglines: What _did_ happen on the Cahulawassee River?

The Cahulawassee River valley in Northern Georgia is one of the last natural pristine areas of the state, which will soon change with the imminent building of a dam on the river, which in turn will flood much of the surrounding land. As such, four Atlanta city slickers – alpha male Lewis Medlock, generally even-keeled Ed Gentry, slightly condescending Bobby Trippe, and wide-eyed Drew Ballinger – decide to take a multi-day canoe trip on the river, with only Lewis and Ed having experience in outdoor life.

They know going in that the area is ethno-culturally homogeneous and isolated, but don’t understand the full extent of such until they arrive and see what they believe is the result of generations of inbreeding. Their relatively peaceful trip takes a turn for the worse when half way through they encounter a couple of hillbilly moonshiners. That encounter not only makes the four battle their way out of the valley intact and alive, but threatens the relationships of the four as they do…

Deliverance is a 1972 American dramatic thriller film produced and directed by John Boorman, and starring Jon Voight, Burt Reynolds, Ned Beatty and Ronny Cox, with the latter two making their feature film debuts. The film is based on the 1970 novel of the same name by American author James Dickey, who has a small role in the film as the Sheriff. The screenplay was written by Dickey and an uncredited Boorman. It was a critical success, earning three Academy Awards and five Golden Globe nominations.

Widely acclaimed as a landmark picture, the film is noted both for the music scene near the beginning, with one of the city men playing “Dueling Banjos” on guitar with a banjo-playing country boy, that sets the tone for what lies ahead—a trip into unknown and potentially dangerous wilderness—and for its visceral and notorious male rape scene. In 2008, Deliverance was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”. It is one of the earliest made films on the National Film Registry in which all the main actors, around whom the plot develops, are still living.

Deliverance (1972) Movie Poster

Deliverance (1972)

Directed by: John Boorman
Starring: Jon Voight, Burt Reynolds, Ned Beatty, Ronny Cox, Billy Redden, Seamon Glass, Bill McKinney, Herbert ‘Cowboy’ Coward, Kathy Rickman
Screenplay by: James Dickey
Cinematography by: Vilmos Zsigmond
Film Editing by: Tom Priestley
Set Decoration by: Morris Hoffman
Art Direction by: Fred Harpman
Distributed by: Warner Bros. Pictures
Release Date: July 30, 1972

Coming Home (1978)

Coming Home (1978)

Sally Bender is the wife of a Captain in the United States Marine Corps. He is sent over to Vietnam, and Sally is alone. With nothing else to do, she decides to volunteer at a local veteran’s hospital, where she meets Luke, who went to high school with Sally. Luke was wounded and is paralyzed and confined to a wheelchair. When Sally begins to fall in love with Luke, she has to make a crucial decision about her life.

Coming Home is a 1978 drama film directed by Hal Ashby and starring Jane Fonda, Jon Voight and Bruce Dern. The screenplay by Waldo Salt and Robert C. Jones was from a story by Nancy Dowd. The plot follows the drama between a young woman, her Marine husband and the paralyzed Vietnam War veteran she meets while her husband is overseas. Fonda and Voight won Academy Awards for their performances.

About the Story

In the spring of 1968 in California, Sally (Jane Fonda), a loyal and conservative military wife, is married to Bob Hyde (Bruce Dern), a captain in the United States Marine Corps who is about to be deployed to Vietnam. As a dedicated military officer, Bob sees it primarily as an opportunity for progress. At first, Sally dreads being left alone, but after a while she feels liberated. Forced to find housing off the base she moves into a new apartment by the beach and buys a sports car.

With nothing else to do, she decides to volunteer at a local veterans’ hospital. This, in part, is motivated by her bohemian friend Vi Munson (Penelope Milford), whose brother Billy has come home after just two weeks in Vietnam with grave emotional problems and now resides in the VA hospital.

At the hospital, Sally meets Luke Martin (Jon Voight), a former high school classmate. Like his friend Billy (Robert Carradine), Luke had gone to Vietnam but come back wounded. He is recuperating at the hospital from the injuries he sustained in the Vietnam War and which left him a paraplegic. Filled with pain, anger, and frustration, Luke is now opposed to the war. Luke at first is a bitter young man, but as he is increasingly thrown into contact with Sally, a relationship starts to develop.

Eventually, Luke is released from the hospital, and, newly mobile with his own wheelchair, begins to rebuild his life. His relationship with Sally deepens. She is also transformed by him and her outlook on life starts to change. They have happy times, play at the beach, and the two fall in love. Meanwhile, Billy, traumatized by his experiences at war, commits suicide by injecting air into his veins. After Billy’s suicide, Luke has only one obsession: do anything to stop sending young men off to war.

Coming Home Movie Poster (1978)

Coming Home

Directed by: Hal Ashby
Starring: Jane Fonda, Jon Voight, Bruce Dern, Penelope Milford, Robert Carradine, Mary Gregory, Kathleen Miller
Screenplay by: Waldo Salt, Robert C. Jones
Cinematography by: Haskell Wexler
Film Editing by: Don Zimmerman
Distributed by United Artists
Release Date: February 15, 1978