Young Frankenstein (1974)

Young Frankenstein (1974)

Taglines: The scariest comedy of all time!

A young neurosurgeon (Gene Wilder) inherits the castle of his grandfather, the famous Dr. Victor von Frankenstein. In the castle he finds a funny hunchback called Igor, a pretty lab assistant named Inga and the old housekeeper, frau Blucher -iiiiihhh!-. Young Frankenstein believes that the work of his grandfather is only crap, but when he discovers the book where the mad doctor described his reanimation experiment, he suddenly changes his mind.

Young Frankenstein is a 1974 American horror comedy film directed by Mel Brooks and starring Gene Wilder as the title character, a descendant of the infamous Dr. Victor Frankenstein. The supporting cast includes Teri Garr, Cloris Leachman, Marty Feldman, Peter Boyle, Madeline Kahn, Kenneth Mars, Richard Haydn and Gene Hackman. The screenplay was written by Wilder and Brooks.

The film is an affectionate parody of the classic horror film genre, in particular the various film adaptations of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein produced by Universal in the 1930s. Most of the lab equipment used as props was created by Kenneth Strickfaden for the 1931 film Frankenstein. To help evoke the atmosphere of the earlier films, Brooks shot the picture entirely in black-and-white, a rarity in the 1970s, and employed 1930s-style opening credits and scene transitions such as iris outs, wipes, and fades to black. The film also features a period score by Brooks’ longtime composer John Morris.

A critical favorite and box office smash, Young Frankenstein ranks No. 28 on Total Film magazine’s readers’ “List of the 50 Greatest Comedy Films of All Time”, No. 56 on Bravo TV’s list of the “100 Funniest Movies”, and No. 13 on the American Film Institute’s list of the 100 funniest American movies. In 2003, it was deemed “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant” by the United States National Film Preservation Board, and selected for preservation in the Library of Congress National Film Registry. On its 40th anniversary, Brooks considered it by far his finest film as writer-producer (albeit not his funniest film).

Young Frankenstein Movie Poster (1974)

Young Frankenstein (1974)

Directed by: Mel Brooks
Starring: Gene Wilder, Madeline Kahn, Marty Feldman, Peter Boyle, Cloris Leachman, Teri Garr, Kenneth Mars, Richard Haydn
Screenplay by: Gene Wilder, Mel Brooks
Production Design by: Dale Hennesy
Cinematography by: Gerald Hirschfeld
Film Editing by: John C. Howard
Costume Design by: Dorothy Jeakins
Set Decoration by: Robert De Vestel
Music by: John Morris
Distributed by: 20th Century Fox
Release Date: December 15, 1974

Taxi Driver (1976)

Taxi Driver (1976)

Taglines: On every street in every city, there’s a nobody who dreams of being a somebody.

Travis Bickle is an ex-Marine and Vietnam War veteran living in New York City. As he suffers from insomnia, he spends his time working as a taxi driver at night, watching porn movies at seedy cinemas during the day, or thinking about how the world, New York in particular, has deteriorated into a cesspool. He’s a loner who has strong opinions about what is right and wrong with mankind. For him, the one bright spot in New York humanity is Betsy, a worker on the presidential nomination campaign of Senator Charles Palantine. He becomes obsessed with her.

After an incident with her, he believes he has to do whatever he needs to make the world a better place in his opinion. One of his priorities is to be the savior for Iris, a twelve-year-old runaway and prostitute who he believes wants out of the profession and under the thumb of her pimp and lover Matthew.

Taxi Driver (1976)

Taxi Driver is a 1976 American vigilante with neo-noir[5][6][7] and psychological thriller elements, directed by Martin Scorsese and written by Paul Schrader. Set in New York City following the Vietnam War, the film stars Robert De Niro, and features Jodie Foster, Harvey Keitel, Cybill Shepherd, Peter Boyle, and Albert Brooks.

The film is regularly cited by critics, film directors, and audiences alike as one of the greatest films of all time. Nominated for four Academy Awards, including Best Picture, it won the Palme d’Or at the 1976 Cannes Film Festival. The American Film Institute ranked Taxi Driver as the 52nd-greatest American film on its AFI’s 100 Years… 100 Movies (10th Anniversary Edition) list.

The film also ranks #17 on Empire magazine’s 2008 list of the 500 greatest movies of all time. In 2012, Sight & Sound named it the 31st-best film ever in its decennial critics’ poll, ranked with The Godfather Part II, and the fifth-greatest film of all time on its directors’ poll. The film was considered “culturally, historically or aesthetically” significant by the US Library of Congress and was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry in 1994.

Taxi Driver Movie Poster (1976)

Taxi Driver (1976)

Directed by: Martin Scorsese
Starring: Robert De Niro, Jodie Foster, Cybill Shepherd, Diahnne Abbott, Albert Brooks, Peter Boyle, Brenda Dickson, Victor Argo
Screenplay by: Paul Schrader
Cinematography by: Michael Chapman
Film Editing by: Tom Rolf, Melvin Shapiro
Costume Design by: Ruth Morley
Set Decoration by: Herbert F. Mulligan
Art Direction by: Charles Rosen
Music by: Bernard Herrmann
Distributed by: Columbia Pictures
Release Date: February 8, 1976