Category: Psychological Thrillers

Trap for Cinderella

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Trap for Cinderella Movie

Taglines: Betrayal burns deep.

Trap for Cinderella is a British crime drama film directed by Iain Softley and starring Tuppence Middleton, Alexandra Roach, Kerry Fox, Aneurin Barnard, Frances de la Tour and Emilia Fox. Based on the novel Piège pour Cendrillon by Sébastien Japrisot, the film is about a young woman who loses her memory after surviving a fire that kills her childhood friend. through reading her dead friend’s diary, she begins to put the pieces of her shattered life back together.

The film starts with Micky (Tuppence Middleton), regaining consciousness in an hospital with Dr. Muller (Erich Redman) asking her if she remembers anything. Micky has suffered severe burn injuries and is suffering from amnesia. Over time she under goes reconstructive surgery and during a session of psychotherapy with Dr. Sylvie Wells (Emilia Fox) we are informed that she is 20 years old and lives in London. Her parents died in an car accident when she was 9 years old. Her late aunt, Elinor (Frances de la Tour) took care of her ever since. Elinor had died recently sometime before Micky’s accident. In the hospital Micky is shown photographs of her friends and relatives but she can’t recognize anybody.

Trap for Cinderella Movie

Sometime later Micky is discharged from the hospital, she has recovered from her injuries but has not regained her memory. Her aunt’s personal assistant, Julia (Kerry Fox) is her guardian now and she takes Micky home. Jake (Aneurin Barnard) calls Micky on her landline but Julia receives the call and informs him that Micky is not ready to meet her friends. Julia informs Micky later that Jake was one of her boyfriends. Micky sees photos of Do (Alexandra Roach) and inquires about her, Julia tells her that Do is a friend and also that Do’s mother (Elizabeth Healey) was a caretaker at Elinor’s house. Julia also informs Micky that when she turns 21, she would inherit the entire estate of Elinor.

Among the photograph she finds envelope sent by Jake, she keeps the envelope. While Julia is distracted by a call, Micky takes a cab and goes to the address mentioned in the envelope. The address turn out to be the office of James Chance (Alex Jennings), who was Elinor’s lawyer. He informs her that Jake works for him. Chance is worried about Micky and tries to inform Julia, but Micky walks out of the office. She meets Jake outside Chance’s office and goes to Jake’s house to talk. Jake informs her that they had broken up the last time they met. They bond and have sex in his apartment. Jake gives her keys to her old apartment. Micky asks Jake about Do, Jake is surprised that Micky does not know it. He informs her that Do died in the accident that burnt her.

Trap for Cinderella Movie - Tuppence Middleton

Micky next visits her old apartment, there she finds Do’s suitcase which contains her letters, clothes and a diary. Micky reads the diary and it is shown in the flash back that Do used to work in a bank and they meet there after a long gap and they exchange their numbers. Micky and Do bond over again and Do informs Micky that after they had last met, her father (Tim Wallers) committed suicide and her mom is dead too. It is also revealed in a flash back that in their childhood, Micky had accidentally almost drowned Do and ran away scared. Do follows her and they see something. This causes Do’s father to take his family away from the Elinor’s home.

Soundtrack

The film’s soundtrack was music supervised by Universal Music Publishing Group and includes music from Cassius, Cat’s Eyes, Crystal Castles, Crystal Fighters, Fixers, Glasser, James Blake, Joker ft. Jessie Ware, Metronomy, Pauline Croze, Peter Sarstedt, The Chemical Brothers and Nouvelle Vague’s cover of Joy Division ‘Love Will Tear Us Apart’.

Trap for Cinderella Movie Poster

Trap for Cinderella

Directed by: Iain Softley
Starring: Aneurin Barnard, Tuppence Middleton, Alexandra Roach, Frances de la Tour, Kerry Fox, Elizabeth Healey
Screenplay by: Sébastien Japrisot, Iain Softley
Production Design by: Gary Williamson
Cinematography by: Alex Barber
Film Editing by: Stuart Gazzard
Costume Design by: Verity Hawkes
Set Decoration by: Cathy Cosgrove
Music by: Christian Henson
MPAA Rating: None.
Studio: IFC Films
Release Date: December 13, 2013

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How I Live Now

How I Live Now Movie

Taglines: Love will lead you home.

How I Live Now is a British drama film based on the 2004 novel of same name by Meg Rosoff, directed by Kevin Macdonald and script written by Tony Grisoni, Jeremy Brock and Penelope Skinner. The film stars Saoirse Ronan, Tom Holland, Anna Chancellor, George MacKay, Corey Johnson and Sabrina Dickens. It was screened in the Special Presentation section at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival.

Set in the near-future UK, Saoirse Ronan plays Daisy, an American teenager sent to stay with relatives in the English countryside. Initially withdrawn and alienated, she begins to warm up to her charming surroundings, and strikes up a romance with the handsome Edmund (George MacKay). But on the fringes of their idyllic summer days are tense news reports of an escalating conflict in Europe. As the UK falls into a violent, chaotic military state, Daisy finds herself hiding and fighting to survive.

Filming began in June 2012 in England and Wales. The film was released on 4 October 2013 in the United Kingdom and was set for release on 28 November 2013 in Australia. On 25 July 2013, Magnolia Pictures acquired the US rights to distribute the film.

How I Live Now Movie - Saoirse Roman

About the Production

“The summer I went to England to stay with my cousins everything changed… Mostly everything changed because of Edmond.” – How I Live Now, Meg Rosoff

When Meg Rosoff’s novel How I Live Now was first published in 2004, it was widely greeted with acclaim and blossomed into a word-of-mouth best-seller. The London-based American author’s remarkable debut found itself showered with prestigious literary awards, including the Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize.

Written in the compellingly innocent but acerbic voice of its heroine, an intelligent but angry and anorexic 15-year-old New Yorker named Daisy, How I Live Now deftly and movingly touched on themes of love, loss and loyalty beneath the topical shadows of war, chaos and carnage. Exiled by her father from Manhattan to the English countryside, Daisy’s coming of age is a mixture of bliss and heartache, the former generated by falling in love with her cousin Edmond, the latter by the darkness that falls when Britain is plunged into war. Suddenly, this self-absorbed teenager is solely responsible for her youngest cousin Piper and forced to embark on an epic and courageous journey of survival.

It was the imaginative scope of Rosoff’s story, set in a parallel or not-too-distant future, and the relatable poignancy of Daisy’s detached but sharply ironic observations about love, war, cousins and countryside that made the novel appeal to young and adult readers alike. Among its fans were Charles Steel and Alasdair Flind of Cowboy Films, who secured the option on Rosoff’s best-seller and put the adaptation into development at Film4.

How I Live Now Movie - Saoirse Ronan

Early on, they sent the book to Kevin Macdonald, who Steel had worked with on The Last King Of Scotland. He also read it and loved it but, after The Last King Of Scotland, he was a filmmaker in demand and his schedule rendered him unavailable. Macdonald was always drawn to the prospect of making a serious film about the teenage experience, as well as one that featured a female lead and a love story – both are firsts for the talented director. When the project came back around to him, he grabbed the opportunity with both hands.

“I think Meg’s book is really beautiful,” says Macdonald. “But as is so often the case, when there’s a really beautiful book, you often have to move further away from it than you would if you were adapting what was a mediocre book. So much of what the book did you can’t do on screen. For one thing it’s Daisy’s internal monologue, which meant that the structure of the book was very hard to replicate. And although Daisy’s voice is so strong in the book, we realized she needed to be slightly different in order for the film to work.”

The producers were faced with the challenge of distilling a novel that ventures into both youth and adult terrain in terms of its themes and subject matter, but without losing the poetic vision that made Rosoff’s manuscript such a celebrated success. Different screenwriters with varied skillsets were brought on board: Tony Grisoni (Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas, In This World) was the first to work on the adaptation, before he passed the baton to Jeremy Brock (The Last King Of Scotland, The Eagle). Acclaimed young playwright Penelope Skinner came on last to put the finishing touches on Daisy, who falls in love with one of her cousins and faces extreme challenges throughout the story.

How I Live Now Movie

“We tried so many different voices for Daisy,” explains Macdonald. “The breakthrough was figuring out that the key to Daisy was her willpower. She is somebody who has an amazingly strong sense of self and identity, but she has used that willpower in very negative ways in her life because her life has been very negative. But she ends up using the same thing that’s made her a troubled person to survive.”

Although it’s likely to be classified in the young-adult section of any bookstore, Rosoff’s novel was strongly embraced by both a teenage and an adult audience. The book’s publisher, Penguin Books, even created separate covers to target both markets. Although that crossover appeal is strongly reflected in Macdonald’s adaptation, everyone involved was aware that the more they defined their target audience, the better chance they had of crossing over to reach both groups.

“Driven by Kevin, we’ve fully embraced it as a teenage love story aimed towards a teenage audience,” says Steel.

“What makes the film stand out,” adds Flind. “Is that this is Kevin’s version of a teenage love story. He has the ability to make it real and rough around the edges in all the right ways. He’ll make it stand out.”

Ronan was an actress whose name came up early on in How I Live Now’s development, around the time of Atonement’s release. Although she would have been too young at the time, the Irish actress’ talent and charisma were obvious to all, and she has gone on to become the standout actress of her generation. Call it serendipity but by the time the stars aligned for How I Live Now to move into production, Ronan was the right age to play Daisy.

Initially, Macdonald had considered going with a cast of non-professionals to portray How I Live Now’s group of five, and he arranged open casting calls to find an unknown to inhabit Daisy. Later, he abandoned that plan and began meeting with teenage actresses, but couldn’t find anyone he felt had the edge that Daisy needed. Until he met Ronan and was blown away. “She came in to read and she was just fantastic, I mean jaw-dropping,” says the Glasgow-born director. “The most amazing thing was that she’d come over from Ireland but hadn’t received the new pages we’d sent her so she had literally 10 minutes to prepare when she arrived. But she did it and she was fantastically good.”

The most enjoyable part of the shoot for Macdonald was getting to work with his teenage and younger cast. “They were fun and energetic and obedient, for the most part,” he smiles. “They were just a pleasure to work with and having so many kids around the whole time, even though Saoirse is 18 and George had just turned 20, created a lovely atmosphere for everybody. I was 44 when I shot it so quite distant from those sort of feelings and obviously I’ve also never experienced what it’s like to be a teenage girl so I came to rely on them in different ways than you do when you’re making a film about adults.”

Wartime Mysteries

“No matter how much you put on a sad expression and talked about how awful it was that all those people were killed and what about Democracy and the Future of Our Great Nation the fact that none of us kids said out loud was that we didn’t really care.”

How I Live Now depicts its wartime with frightening realism, and yet, seen through the eyes of its largely oblivious teenage protagonists, leaves a shroud of mystery around what’s actually happening. The unknown enemy that manages to seize control of the nation remains a shadowy force. “The world that Meg created is very much about ambiguity and we wanted to leave it in that world,” says Macdonald. “I’m sure that some people will ask, ‘Who are the enemy? What’s going on?’ But I believe it’s the right decision to keep it as vague as possible because, in a way, it’s all a metaphor. It’s not a political film, it’s not a film about the situation in the world, it’s the story of an unhappy teenage girl falling in love.”

“I don’t think it’s necessarily important for the audience to know everything that Eddie’s been through,” says MacKay, agreeing with his director. “What’s important is that the film is about healing damaged people and Eddie heals Daisy through their love. Sex and true love are new discoveries that come with being with each other and at the end of the film; Daisy is on the path to healing him.”

Macdonald wanted to steep the film in the English romantic tradition, which is why songs by melodic folk-rockers Fairport Convention and English singer-songwriter Nick Drake feature on the soundtrack. “It’s about the beauty of the landscape and the threat of the landscape at the same time,” he notes, “and I want to reflect this magical, melancholic version of England in the music.”

More than any film Macdonald has made, How I Live Now rests on a single character’s journey. Daisy goes on a staggering arc during the narrative, conveyed by Ronan with extraordinary conviction; the novel’s numerous fans will be thrilled to witness her performance. “I know teenage girls who got so excited when they heard I was making this movie,” says the actress. “Having a leading young woman like Daisy who’s very messed up and unsure of herself and insecure, I know as a teenager they’re the kind of characters I relate to more because they’re not perfect and they’re not glorified. Pretty much every teenage girl goes through at least some of what Daisy experiences.”

“What I find interesting about Saoirse’s performance is that she’s not always sympathetic in the film and she did sometimes find that difficult because she is, by nature, such a lovely person,” muses Macdonald. “But that makes it a particularly strong performance because it’s Saoirse as you’ve never seen her before. She’s tough, ballsy and the most grown-up we’ve seen her be. In this film, we watch her becoming a grown-up in front of our eyes and that’s exciting. After this film, you’ll see people start casting her as a leading lady.”

How I Live Now Movie Poster

How I Live Now

Directed by: Director: Kevin Macdonald
Starring: Saoirse Ronan, Tom Holland, Anna Chancellor, George MacKay, Corey Johnson, Harley Bird
Screenplay by: Jeremy Brock, Tony Grisoni
MPAA Rating: R for violence, disturbing images, language and some sexuality.
Production Design by: Jacqueline Abrahams
Cinematography by: Franz Lustig
Film Editing by: Jinx Godfrey
Costume Design by: Jane Petrie
Art Direction by: Astrid Sieben
Music by: Jon Hopkins
Studio: Magnolia Pictures
Release Date: November 8, 2013

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The Past – Le Passé

The Past - Le Passé Movie

Coming back to accomplish the divorce procedure, Ahmad an Iranian man, arrives in Paris after four years to meet his ex-wife and her daughters from her previous marriage. He notices his ex is in a relationship with an Arab named Samir who also has a son and a wife in a coma. The relationship of the older daughter and her mother is in deterioration because the daughter thinks her mother is the cause of Samir’s wife comatose state. The affairs get more complicated when the older daughter discloses something heinous she has done.

The Past (French: Le Passé) is a French drama film directed by the Iranian director Asghar Farhadi and starring Bérénice Bejo, Tahar Rahim and Ali Mosaffa. It was nominated for the Palme d’Or at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival and won the Prize of the Ecumenical Jury. Bérénice Bejo also won the Best Actress Award. It was shown at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival. The film has been selected as the Iranian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 86th Academy Awards.

The Past - Le Passé Movie

Review for The Past – Le Passé

Like his previous film, A Separation, Asghar Farhadi’s The Past begins with a deceptively straightforward divorce. Returning to Paris from Tehran to legally terminate his marriage after a four-year absence, Ahmad (Ali Mosaffa) learns that his wife, Marie (Bérénice Bejo), has been living with another man, Samir (Tahar Rahim). Papers may be signed with minimal fuss but the past cannot be so easily buried, and once again the Iranian director creates an opportunity to showcase his striking ability to use multiple perspectives to tell an infinitely complex story.

Making little use of the suburban Parisian backdrop, Farhadi opts instead for a chamber drama that is as tightly packed as Marie’s rickety old house. In addition to two children from a previous relationship—petite Léa (Jeanne Jestin) and teenage Lucie (Pauline Burlet)—Samir’s young son Fouad (Elyes Aguis) also lives there, reluctantly. For better and worse, the presence of the even-tempered Ahmad sets the already precarious household off balance as he simultaneously mediates and instigates familial problems large and small.

The Past - Le Passé Movie - Berenice Bejo

Despite the obvious conflict of interest, Ahmad is able to assuage the furrow-browed Fouad when he throws his violent tantrums and to coax information from an increasingly moody Lucie. Vehemently disapproving of her mother’s latest relationship, Lucie explains that Samir’s wife is in a coma due to an attempted suicide—a suicide she believes to have been catalyzed by her mother’s affair with Samir. But as far as Marie is concerned, this tragic turn of events was merely the grim culmination of the woman’s long battle with depression, and she can furnish a witness to prove it: the illegal immigrant (Sabrina Ouazani), whom Samir employs at his dry cleaning business.

Much like A Separation, the story spirals, whodunit style, around the blame of the suicide—and around and around—propelled forward and nudged backward as details of past events are revealed and contradicted. As each character attempts to offload their sense of guilt onto someone else, Farhadi further elucidates the elusive nature of truth itself. Forcing his characters into moral gray zones, the director weakens the notion of objectivity, allowing the viewer’s allegiances to shift freely among the household’s denizens—even if as individuals, none of them is particularly sympathetic.

Dispensing with A Separation’s primarily handheld aesthetic, The Past demonstrates a thoroughgoing commitment to stillness. While its visual style mirrors the characters’ sometimes frustrating inability to move forward, the careful framing of bodies and faces—whether crammed into doorways or dim hallways—emphasizes private moments of interiority and noncommunication.

The Past - Le Passé Movie

Despite a number of melodramatic ingredients—comas, hidden pregnancies, torrential downpours, and secret missives, among others—the film remains subtly understated, thanks in large part to the impeccable cast. Shaking off the plucky flapper she played in The Artist, Bejo is particularly impressive as the hot-tempered Marie and is well paired here with the soft-spoken Mosaffa, who exudes a paternal calm. Rahim, as always, brings a quiet but subtly dangerous power to the screen as Samir, while Burlet demonstrates maturity beyond her young years as the emotionally fraught Lucie.

Though The Past may lack its predecessor’s gripping sense of urgency (the 130-minute running time does not go unnoticed), it is precisely its circuitous structure that imbues the film with a sense of unadorned reality. Never leaning on flashbacks or expository dialogue, Farhadi doesn’t pit the past against the present so much as he presents the two as inextricably—and rather bleakly—linked. If the past can only become clear in the present, what hope does that leave for the future?

The Past - Le Passé Movie Poster

The Past – Le Passé

Directed by: Asghar Farhadi
Starring: Bérénice Bejo, Tahar Rahim, Ali Mosaffa, Pauline Burlet, Elyes Aguis, Jeanne Jestin, Sabrina Ouazani
Screenplay by: Asghar Farhadi
Production Design by: Claude Lenoir
Cinematography by: Mahmoud Kalari
Film Editing by: Juliette Welfling
Costume Design by: Jean-Daniel Vuillermoz
Music by: Evgueni Galperine, Youli Galperine
MPAA Rating: PG-13 for mature thematic material and brief strong language.
Studio: Sony Pictures Classics
Release Date: December 20, 2013

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I Spit on Your Grave 2

I Spit on Your Grave 2 Movie

Katie, a young woman, is trying to make it in the cutthroat world of modeling in New York. When Katie innocently accepts an offer to have new photos taken for her portfolio, the experience quickly turns into an unthinkable nightmare – Severely beaten, battered, bruised, and left for dead, she will have to tap into the darkest places of the human psyche to not only survive her ordeal, but to ultimately find the strength to exact her brutal revenge. The film was made by the same creative team as the controversial 2010 film: Director Steven R. Monroe, Producers Lisa Hansen and Paul Hertzberg, and Writer Neil Elman teaming up with Thomas Fenton (Saw IV).

I Spit on Your Grave 2 is an American rape and revenge horror film directed by Steven R. Monroe, who directed its predecessor, I Spit on Your Grave—which was based on Meir Zarchi’s 1978 film of the same name. The film was given a limited theatrical release at one theater and has been received negatively by critics.

About the Story

Katie Carter (Jemma Dallender) is an aspiring model from Missouri who works as a waitress in a New York City restaurant. Desperate to update her modeling portfolio, she answers an advertisement offering a free photography session. She then meets three Bulgarian siblings, photographer Ivan (Absolom) and his assistants Nikolai, known as “Nicky” (Aleksiev) and Georgy (Baharov), who becomes infatuated with Katie.

She leaves the photo shoot after disagreeing with Ivan about a topless shot. Georgy later arrives at Katie’s apartment and apologizes regarding the incident. Katie accepts his apology and is given a flash drive containing her photos. Before leaving, Georgy states that she can keep the pictures for her privacy, upload, or use the photos as she chooses.

I Spit on Your Grave 2 Movie

Later that night, Katie wakes up to find Georgy filming her and shoots him with an electroshock gun. Although Kate tries to escape, Georgy binds, gags and sodomizes her. Katie’s neighbor, Jayson, arrives and tries to stop the rape but Georgy stabs and kills him. Georgy panics and calls both his brothers. Nikolai and Ivan later arrive and clean up all evidence of the crime. Ivan then force-feeds Katie ketamine, rendering her unconscious.

Katie wakes and finds herself naked and handcuffed to a pipe in an old basement. The brothers relentlessly rape and torture her. She overpowers Georgy and escapes, but discovers that she is now in an unknown city. When she approaches Bulgarian police, she is taken into safe custody by Detective Kiril (Zlaterev), who informs her that she has been abducted to Bulgaria. After an interview, Detective Kiril hands her over to Ana (Stockley), who claims to be from a rape crisis center but is really Nikolai and Georgy’s mother. Katie is returned to the basement and Valko (Silverleaf), a friend of the family’s father, electroshocks her genitals then brutally rapes her, leaving her bloodied. Ivan then beats her.

I Spit on Your Grave 2 Movie

Katie is then placed in a box with her crucifix necklace and Valko’s electroshock gun and buried alive. The ground beneath the makeshift coffin breaks and she falls into the sewer system below. Naked and hungry, Katie steals from a nearby church and is soon caught by priest Father Dimov (Pelka), who recognizes her as a rape victim. He gives her food, clothing, and a Bible. Katie approaches the U.S. Embassy, but leaves before going inside. Back at the church, Dimov offers support. As Katie goes back to the sewers, she leaves her Bible open for Dimov to read. After reading the passage “vengeance is mine”, Dimov realizes that Katie seeks revenge against her rapists.

Interview with Jemma Dallender

How did you end up working on I Spit On Your Grave 2 – what drew you to playing such a tough role?

Well, initially my agent mentioned that she had an audition for me, and as soon as she said the role contained full frontal nudity, I was like, ‘No way! Not for me at all’- but she persuaded me to head along to the audition anyway and as I got into the process I realised I loved the character and the controversy of the film. It was a role I could get my teeth into and as an actress I’m always looking for new challenges. Also, the plot and the sentiment of the film, you realise why there are such graphic scenes, violence, nudity- it makes sense, it’s not in there just for pure shock factor. I of course watched the original film, and the 2010 remake and I loved the idea and the controversy surrounding this kind of role.

I Spit on Your Grave 2 Movie - Jemma Dallender

So you think that the audience has to see the character, Katie, pushed to the brink – that it gives reasoning for her behaviour so that you’re rooting for her when she exacts her revenge?

Exactly. She’s made to feel so small, and treated so mercilessly. They [the male characters who kidnap Katie] reduce the character to nothing and she kind of loses her humanity in all ways possible- in order to get to that stage of the film you need to see the graphic and intense stuff she experiences.

Your character goes through a major ordeal to say the least, but she ends up being pretty badass by the end- Do you have a favourite revenge scene?

It has to be the way she gets Ivan [let’s just say it involves a vice certain parts of the male anatomy]. It was so disgusting, but ended up being quite funny to film too… The prosthetics were too big so it had to be changed, and refitted so we had a laugh at that. Although I think Joe [Absalom] was quite uncomfortable by the end, laying there strapped to a table, half naked all day. I felt kind of guilty to be honest so saying I enjoyed them is a bit mean, and an overstatement. The guys felt so bad during their rape and torture scenes, and I was like, ‘it’s fine, we’re only acting’, and they said, ‘wait ‘til you have to do the mean stuff’, and they were right I felt awful! But the vice scene…It’s just the ultimate revenge a female character can get and I’m sure probably the worst scene for any man to watch…

I guess it was important to be able to have a laugh on set as the subject matter was so intense- did you have any other techniques to deal with the intensity of the role?

To be honest, most of the time I would avoid having a laugh and a chat on set so that I could stay in character. I had to be in a really deep and dark place and I find it hard to find that place and then switch between that and happy when the cameras aren’t rolling. I stayed pretty sombre whilst on set. But off-set of course we had a laugh and all got on really well.

I Spit on Your Grave 2 Movie

You mentioned you watched the original 1978 I Spit On Your Grave and the 2010 remake; did you feel under any pressure following up these infamous female leads with the sequel?

No, not pressure really. I don’t think it’s good to place too much pressure on yourself when tackling a role and this is an entirely new film in its own right so I wasn’t trying to recreate something. Of course I watched them, and they are great- they made me interested in the role. I just tried to make it my own and put my own spin on the character. This instalment in comparison with the other two is a lot more brutal and intense so I was ready for the controversy. People are always going to have an opinion about films like this but I think that’s good- weather they like it or not. It’s better to provoke a reaction, rather than making a film that nobody wants to talk about.

Do you think the film could be described as a ‘feminist’ horror due to taking back control in an otherwise male dominated cast and wreaking rape-revenge?

I definitely think it’s a feminist film- strong female lead roles- lead roles in general are few and far between nowadays, particularly in horror. There is definitely a sense of empowerment. Katie is tough and pulls through, even physically and we don’t see that often in film so it was a really refreshing and challenging role to take on.

Are you a horror film fan?

This may surprise you, but I’m actually quite squeamish- so the blood, guts and gore isn’t really my thing. It wouldn’t be my first choice to watch something like that. But I do like psychological thrillers, and horrors and supernatural stuff too- like, ‘The Conjuring’, I saw that recently. That’s the kind of horror that would keep me awake at night…

I Spit on Your Grave 2 Movie Poster

I Spit on Your Grave 2

Directed by: Steven R. Monroe
Starring: Jemma Dallender, Yavor Baharov, Joe Absolom, Aleksandar Aleksiev, Mary Stockley
Screenplay by: Neil Elman, Thomas H. Fenton
Production Design by: Severina Stoyanova
Cinematography by: Damian Bromley
Film Editing by: Kristina Hamilton-Grobler
Costume Design by: Desislava Andonova
Set Decoration by: Rosen Stefanov
Music by: Corey A. Jackson
MPAA Rating: R for strong sadistic violence, torture and rape, graphic nudity, language and some drug content.
Studio: Anchor Bay Films
Release Date: September 20, 2013

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Homefront

Homefront Movie

Taglines: How far would you go to protect your home?

The story centers on Phil Broker (Jason Statham), a former DEA agent who moves his family to a quiet town to escape his past. However, he discovers the town is overrun by a dangerous meth distributor named Gator (James Franco).

Homefront is an American action thriller film directed by Gary Fleder and released nationwide in theaters on November 27. Based on Chuck Logan’s novel of the same name and adapted into a screenplay by Sylvester Stallone, the film stars Jason Statham, James Franco, Winona Ryder, and Kate Bosworth. Filming began on October 1, 2012 in New Orleans.

About the Story

In Shreveport, Louisiana, DEA Agent Phil Broker (Jason Statham) is undercover in a biker gang, led by Danny T (Chuck Zito). The bikers go to a bar where they cook crystal meth. The DEA invade the bar and Broker is revealed to be a DEA agent and escapes during a shootout, along with Danny T and his son Jojo. Broker chases them and Danny T is arrested, but Jojo commits suicide by cop. A distraught Danny T swears revenge on Broker for his son’s death as he is taken away to jail. Disturbed by what has happened, Broker quits his job.

Two years later, Broker and his daughter Maddy (Izabela Vidovic) have moved to a small town, where Maddy’s deceased mother grew up. Broker has set up a contracting business with his friend Teedo (Omar Benson Miller). One day while Maddy is playing at school, a classmate & bully named Teddy Klum takes Maddy’s cap, makes fun of her, then pushes her to the ground. She had initially responded by twice politely asking for her hat back, but then punches him in the gut and breaks his nose with a foot to the face as he falls down.

Homefront Movie - Winona Ryder>

Broker and Teddy’s parents are called by school counselor Susan (Rachelle Lefevre). Susan tells Broker that Teddy is a special needs child, while his parents, Cassie (Kate Bosworth) and Jimmy (Marcus Hester), can be a handful. Broker tells Susan he has taught Maddy to defend herself. The local sheriff (Clancy Brown) arrives and attempts to keep the peace. Cassie convinces Jimmy to confront Broker, Broker defends himself and gains the attention of teachers, townspeople and the sheriff.

Susan warns Broker that he needs to be careful. Meanwhile, drug dealer Gator Bodine (James Franco) confronts some local teens for doing business in his area. That night, Cassie, who is Gator’s sister, goes to his home and asks him to scare Broker. It is also revealed that she has a drug problem and Gator is her main supplier.

A few days later, Broker is approached and threatened by a couple of Gator’s thugs (Stuart Greer and Owen Harn), but he defeats them in a fight at a gas station. The sheriff later stops him on the road to ask Broker ‘what he is’, and Broker tells him it is a “need to know” situation. The sheriff tells him that he now has his attention, and drives off.

The next day, while Broker is horseback riding with Maddy, Gator breaks into Broker’s house and steals Maddy’s cat and one of her stuffed animals. Looking through Broker’s personal belongings he finds a a file and photo of an undercover Broker and takes it. After going through Broker’s file, Gator realizes that Broker is responsible for Danny T’s arrest.

Homefront Movie

Scheming to acquire exclusive state-wide drug distribution rights through the biker gang, Gator tells his ex-girlfriend Sheryl Mott (Winona Ryder) about Broker, since she knows people searching for him. Sheryl warns him the whole idea is dangerous and crazy, but he insists she tell Danny T’s lawyer, who manages to get the information to Danny T, who then asks his lawyer to “take care of this for me” (to kill Broker to avenge Jojo’s death).

Broker asks Teedo about Gator and he learns that Gator is a Meth cook & local criminal badass. Gator gets away with his crimes by informing for the sheriff, eliminating the other criminal competition in town, thus making the sheriff’s job easier. In turn, the sheriff tends to look the other way when Gator cooks (despite this, the sheriff is still basically an honest man). Teedo also mentions that Gator eats breakfast every day at the same time at a local diner where Teedo does.

The next morning, Broker confronts Gator, who is having breakfast with Sheryl, and makes it clear he knows the break-in and theft was committed by Gator. Broker receives a photo of Sheryl from an old DEA colleague. He goes to Gator’s house to investigate. After setting a booby trap in the meth lab he discovers, he finds the stuffed animal and Maddy’s cat. While catching the cat, he is knocked out by Gator’s thugs. In revenge for their earlier defeat they torture him, but he manages to break free, beat down the thugs and escape. He decides that he and Maddy need to leave town immediately. Broker asks Teedo to help him.

Homefront Movie Poster

Homefront

Directed by: Gary Fleder
Starring: James Franco, Jason Statham, Winona Ryder, Kate Bosworth, Rachelle Lefevre, Nicole Andrews, Christa Campbell, Izabela Vidovic
Screenplay by: Chuck Logan, Sylvester Stallone
Production Design by: Greg Berry
Cinematography by: Theo van de Sande
Film Editing by: Padraic McKinley
Costume Design by: Kelli Jones
Set Decoration by: Cynthia La Jeunesse
Music by: Mark Isham
MPAA Rating: R for strong violence, pervasive language, drug content and brief sexuality.
Studio: Open Road Films
Release Date: November 27, 2013

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Hellbenders 3D

Hellbenders 3D Movie

Taglines: Deliver them to evil.

There are demons so terrible that no mortal man of God could successfully drive them back to Hell. The only option is for the exorcist himself to invite possession and then commit suicide, dragging along the demon to damnation – so the Augustine Interfaith Order of Hellbound Saints – or Hellbenders – was formed. A group of elite, highly-trained exorcists, they live in a constant state of debauchery so they will be ready to go to Hell at any moment. When an infernal Norse demon called BLACK SURTR escapes into New York City intent on cracking open the gates of Hell, the Hellbenders must use every ounce of their debauchery to battle the demon and save the planet from eternal damnation.

Director’s Statement

I’m just barely old enough to have experienced the anxiety of possible nuclear annihilation. In the early ‘80s we still had bomb drills at my Catholic school outside Washington, D.C. I’ve always been grateful for the nightmares of slow, rotting death via radiation poisoning, if only for giving me the context to later understand what an awesomely inspiring movie DR. STRANGELOVE is.

Kubrick treats nuclear war as absolutely real, dangerous and terrifying, but still manages somehow to laugh at it. It’s thrilling and cathartic, a premise filled with amazing visuals and the kind of ecstatic, paradoxical misbehavior that pulls iconic performances from its cast. I can only imagine what a frightening and inspiring movie it must have been in ’64.

Hellbenders 3D Movie

I’ll let other filmmakers pretend they can grow up to be Stanley Kubrick, and I don’t think HELLBENDERS is as scary as STRANGELOVE – I’d rather face demonic possession than nuclear annihilation, and to be honest, I’d probably rather face Hell than total oblivion. (This is a director’s statement about a comedy, I promise.)

It’s now 2012, and more Americans believe in The Devil than they do the Theory of Evolution, and by a widening margin. The Devil is real in America and exorcism is a film conceit that can still frighten a jaded movie-going audience.

When the extended cut of THE EXORCIST made a theatrical run in 2000, I attended a screening at Radio City Music hall and watched it with more than a thousand people. It was still effective twenty‐seven years later, and I don’t think anybody in the audience was less than terrified. The most remarkable part of the experience for me, though, was how much the audience laughed. I can’t imagine anybody thought the movie was ridiculous; I think it was laughter as release, a communal cry of “Uncle!” We had all just been so thoroughly emotionally pummeled, so overstuffed with sensory input that we would have opened any valve we could. As an audience, as a crowd of strangers at the mercy of the same overwhelming spectacle, laughter was all we could reach for. (I laugh and cringe at UFC fights by the same instinct.) But does that mean THE EXORCIST is a funny movie? I kind of think it does.

Hellbenders 3D Movie

I don’t remember how the concept for HELLBENDERS first landed on me, the idea that a preacher would necessarily need to court sin and debauchery in order to be spiritually prepared for total war with Hell, but once I had it, it was impossible to think about an exorcism story on any other terms. And I thought that was really, really funny.

There’s been no shortage of exorcism movies in the past few years and the conceits are starting to stretch pretty thin. But when you make all those ideas explicit ‐ all of the rules, the discipline, the anti­spiritual bureaucracy of any church -­‐ it gets ridiculous enough to be fun.

And it’s such an opportunity for character. It was great fun thinking of the kinds of ministers and priests who would end up as Hellbound Saints; the compulsively-­‐ sinful man the church wouldn’t take in any other branch, the overly‐pious man who hates sin and sinning but will make that sacrifice to fight Satan, the female minister who wants to be doing spiritual battle on a scale she couldn’t with the Unitarians. The entire cast (Clifton Collins Jr! Dan Fogler! Andre Royo!) was so good and so clearly got the fun and weird innocence of the concept. I grew up thinking of Clancy Brown as the heaviest of the heavies; he spends half this movie wearing nothing but a rug and a woman’s purple bathrobe.

But HELLBENDERS isn’t satire. I don’t have any interest in camp. The hardest part of the movie was balancing the gonzo characters and real idea of violence, both spiritual and physical. From the few small screenings we’ve had so far, the hardest laughs and biggest reaction we’ve had came from Catholics, people who were raised on a weekly diet of church.

What I hope is funny about HELLBENDERS is what’s scary about THE EXORCIST-­ Hell might be real. Our kind and benevolent Creator may be holding the threat of eternal damnation and unimaginable suffering over our heads until the day we die. Hilarious!

Hellbenders 3D Movie Poster

Hellbenders 3D

Directed by: J.T. Petty
Starring: Clifton Collins Jr., Clancy Brown, Andre Royo, Robyn Rikoon, Macon Blair
Screenplay by: J.T. Petty
MPAA Rating: R for bloody violence, some disturbing images, pervasive language, sexual content and drug use.
Studio: Lionsgate Films
Release Date: October 18, 2013

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Out of the Furnace

Out of the Furnace

Taglines: Sometimes your battles choose you.

Russell Baze (Christian Bale) and his younger brother Rodney Jr. (Casey Affleck) live in the economically-depressed Rust Belt, and have always dreamed of escaping and finding better lives. But when a cruel twist of fate lands Russell in prison, his brother is lured into one of the most violent and ruthless crime rings in the Northeast – a mistake that will almost cost him everything. Once released, Russell must choose between his own freedom, or risk it all to seek justice for his brother.

The film is being produced by Relativity Media, with Jeff Waxman, Tucker Tooley and Brooklyn Weaver serving as executive producers. Leonardo DiCaprio, Tony Scott and Ridley Scott are among the film’s producers. Director Scott Cooper read an article about Braddock, Pennsylvania, a declining steel industry town outside of Pittsburgh, hit hard economic depression, political corruption and the efforts to revitalize it led by Latoya Ruby Frazier, a life long resident, community activist and artist. After visiting, Cooper was inspired to use the borough as the backdrop for a film. Cooper developed an original story and co-wrote the screenplay with Brad Ingelsby. The story has no relation to Out of This Furnace, a 1941 historical novel by Thomas Bell, set in Braddock.

Out of the Furnace

Production began in the Pittsburgh metropolitan area on April 13, 2012, and wrapped on June 1, 2012. The majority of filming took place in Braddock, with additional filming in nearby North Braddock, Imperial, and Rankin. Prison scenes were shot in the Northern Panhandle of West Virginia, at the former State Penitentiary in Moundsville. Filming also took place in rural Beaver County, including a deer hunting scene in Raccoon Creek State Park, and a mill scene in Koppel. The Carrie Furnace, an abandoned blast furnace near Braddock, served as the location for the film’s finale.

Originally, it was announced that Alberto Iglesias had reached an agreement to compose the score for the film. However, Dickon Hinchliffe has taken over duties for scoring the film. Pearl Jam frontman Eddie Vedder will also record a new song for the film.

Out of the Furnace Poster

Out of the Furnace

Directed by: Scott Cooper
Starring: Christian Bale, Casey Affleck, Woody Harrelson, Zoe Saldana, Forest Whitaker, Willem Dafoe, Sam Shepard
Screenplay by: Brad Ingelsby, Scott Cooper
Production Design by: Thérèse DePrez
Cinematography by: Masanobu Takayanagi
Film Editing by: David Rosenbloom
Costume Design by: Kurt and Bart
Set Decoration by: Merissa Lombardo
Music by: Dickon Hinchliffe
MPAA Rating: R for strong violence, language and drug content.
Studio: Relativity Media
Release Date: December 6, 2013

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Oldboy

Oldboy Movie

Taglines: Ask not why you were imprisoned. Ask why you were set free.

A provocative, visceral thriller that follows the story of an advertising executive (Josh Brolin) who is abruptly kidnapped and held hostage for 20 years in solitary confinement. When he is inexplicably released, he embarks on an obsessive mission to discover who orchestrated his bizarre and torturous punishment only to find he is still trapped in a web of conspiracy and torment.

Oldboy is an American remake of Park Chan-wook’s 2003 South Korean cult film, which is based on the Japanese manga with the same name published 1996-1998. Directed by Spike Lee and written by Mark Protosevich, the film stars Josh Brolin, Elizabeth Olsen, and Sharlto Copley.

The film was released on November 27, 2013. It was the last film to be distributed by FilmDistrict, before Focus Features absorbed the company in October 2013. It received a mixed reception from both critics and audiences, with praise towards the acting and visual style, but criticism for the comparisons to the original and adding nothing new to the film. The film was a box office bomb, being one of Lee’s worst-performing films of his directing career.

Oldboy Movie - Elizabeth Olsen

About the Story

In 1993, alcoholic advertising executive Joe Doucett (Josh Brolin) ruins a meeting with a potential client, Daniel Newcombe (Lance Reddick), by hitting on his girlfriend. Afterwards, Joe gets drunk, and goes to a bar owned by his friend Chucky (Michael Imperioli), who refuses him entry. While stuck outside, he spots a woman with a yellow umbrella, before being knocked unconscious.

He awakens in an isolated hotel room and finds he is a prisoner. His captors provide him with basic hygiene items and meager portions of processed Chinese food, along with a pint of vodka with every meal to prevent withdrawal. Through the TV, Joe hears that he has been framed for the rape and murder of his ex-wife and that his daughter, Mia, has been adopted. After being prevented from committing suicide, Joe starts writing Mia letters, gives up drinking, and spends the next 20 years planning his revenge. He gets in shape, becomes a skilled boxer by watching televised matches, and compiles a list of everyone who might be responsible for his imprisonment, with Newcombe being the prime suspect.

In 2013, Joe watches an adult Mia being interviewed by a TV show called “Unresolved Mysteries of Crime”, and claiming she would be willing to forgive him if he returns. Suddenly, he is drugged and awakes in a box in a field, with money and a cell phone. He spots the woman with the yellow umbrella, whom he chases to a nearby clinic; there he meets Marie Sebastian (Elizabeth Olsen), a nurse who offers to help him. Joe refuses help but takes her card.

Oldboy Movie

He later visits Chucky and tells him what happened. He receives a mocking phone call from the mastermind behind his imprisonment, The Stranger (Sharlto Copley). After learning Newcombe died in a plane crash, Joe investigates the other names on his list, and learns they are all innocent. He eventually passes out from dehydration, and Chucky calls Marie, who gives Joe medical treatment.

Marie reads the letters Joe has written for Mia and offers to help him. With her, Joe is able to locate the restaurant that provided the food he was given in captivity and follows a man who arrives to take a large order to an abandoned factory, which is where he was held captive. Joe confronts the owner, Chaney (Samuel L. Jackson), and tortures him into giving him a taped conversation in which he discusses the terms of Joe’s imprisonment with The Stranger. Joe is then forced to fight off all of Chaney’s men, one of whom stabs him in the back. Joe then is then returned to Chucky’s bar, where he meets The Stranger himself and his bodyguard Haeng-Bok, the woman with the yellow umbrella, who has kidnapped Mia.

Oldboy Movie Poster

Oldboy

Directed by: Spike Lee
Starring: Samuel L. Jackson, Josh Brolin, Elizabeth Olsen, Sharlto Copley, Lance Reddick, Hannah Simone
Screenplay by: Garon Tsuchiya, Nobuaki Minegishi, Mark Protosevich
Production Design by: Sharon Seymour
Cinematography by: Sean Bobbitt
Film Editing by: Barry Alexander Brown
Costume Design by: Ruth E. Carter
Set Decoration by: Maggie Martin
Music by: Roque Baños
Studio: FilmDistrict
Release Date: November 27, 2013

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Machete Kills

Machete Kills Movie - Sofia Vergara

Taglines: Trained to kill. Left for dead. Back for more.

During an operation of a Mexican Cartel, Machete Cortez and Sartana Rivera intercept the criminals alone, but another group arrives and a masked man kills Sartana. Machete is arrested, accused of killing his beloved Sartana and Sheriff Doakes hangs Machete. But the President of the USA pardons and recruits Machete to kill the revolutionary Marcos Mendez that has threatened the USA with a missile with a bomb.

Machete goes to San Antonio to meet the Miss San Antonio Blanca Vasquez that will be the liaison between Machete and President Rathcock. Then Machete goes to the brothel of Madame Desdemona to seek out the prostitute Cereza that is Mendez’s mistress. Machete meets Mendez and learns that his heart is connected to the missile and only the arm dealer Luther Voz is capable to disarm the bomb. Now Machete needs to bring Mendez to the USA in less than twenty-four hours and save his new country in a dangerous journey with betrayals.

Machete Kills is an American action-comedy film written and directed by Robert Rodriguez. It is the third film based on Grindhouse fake trailers. Danny Trejo, Michelle Rodriguez, Tom Savini, Billy Blair, Electra and Elise Avellan, Felix Sabates and Jessica Alba reprise their roles from the first film, as well as being joined by series newcomers Mel Gibson, Demián Bichir, Amber Heard, Sofía Vergara, Lady Gaga, Antonio Banderas, Cuba Gooding Jr., Vanessa Hudgens, Alexa Vega, William Sadler, Marko Zaror and Charlie Sheen (credited by his real name of “Carlos Estévez”).

Machete Kills Movie - Amber Heard

About the Story

The film starts with Machete Cortez (Danny Trejo) and Sartana Rivera (Jessica Alba) attempting to capture weapon dealers who have been supplying the Mexican drug cartels. The military men are then all killed by the gangsters, who in turn are wiped out by another intervening party. Its leader murders Sartana while Machete is arrested by a corrupt Sheriff Doakes (William Sadler) and Deputy Clebourne (Samuel Davis).

Doakes tries to unsuccessfully hang Machete but the President of the US, Rathcock (Charlie Sheen), intervenes. Machete is brought to the White House, where the president offers him US citizenship if he eliminates Marcos Mendez (Demián Bichir), a psychopath who is threatening to fire a nuclear missile at Washington, D.C. if the American government does not intervene to stop the rampant drug cartels in Mexico and the corruption of its government.

Machete agrees and travels to San Antonio, where he meets his handler Blanca Vasquez (Amber Heard), an undercover beauty pageant competitor. She sends him to Acapulco to meet a young woman, Cereza (Vanessa Hudgens), who can lead him to Mendez. Machete finds her in a brothel run by her mother, Madame Desdemona (Sofía Vergara), who attempts to kill Machete before he escapes with Cereza. She takes him to Mendez’s associate, Zaror (Marko Zaror), who kills Cereza before taking Machete to Mendez’s base of operations.

Machete Kills Movie - Michelle Rodriguez

There, Machete learns that Mendez has wired the missile’s launch device to his heart and triggered its launch in 24 hours. If he dies, the missile fires. After killing Zaror he captures Mendez, intending to escort him to US and find a way to disarm the missile. Machete learns that Mendez is an ex-secret agent who tried to expose his corrupt superiors, only to be betrayed and forced to watch his family being tortured. The trauma drove him insane by creating his split personalities, as well as led him to join forces with the missile’s creator.

Shortly thereafter, a hit is put on their heads. Machete is targeted by Madame Desdemona and her prostitute assassins, including a shapeshifting hitman called El Camaleón (Lady Gaga), as well as Doakes. Machete and Mendez manage to reach the US and kill Doakes and Clebourne only to be caught by a reborn Zaror and the same mercenaries who killed Sartana. Zaror decapitates Mendez and Machete is riddled with bullets by the gunmen.

Machete wakes up to find himself in a healing tank. He is taken to meet Zaror’s benefactor—corrupt businessman, inventor and Star Wars fan Luther Voz (Mel Gibson). He shows Machete Mendez’s beating heart, preserved in a jar, as well as informs him of his plan to manipulate extremists throughout the world to detonate nuclear weapons while planning to escape in a spaceship to rebuild society in space. Machete then escapes with help from Luz (Michelle Rodriguez), who had heard about the hit on Machete. She informs him that the only one who can disarm Mendez’s heart is Machete’s old enemy, Osiris Amanpour (Tom Savini). Machete contacts Vasquez, who instructs him to meet her at a rendezvous point.

Machete Kills Movie

Arriving there, Machete is betrayed and ambushed by Vasquez, who is in league with Voz. As she is escaping into the desert, Machete gives chase and jumps onto the top of her vehicle but falls off after gunfire comes through the roof. Machete is then given a ride by El Camaleón, who tries to kill him one last time. But he escapes and El Camaleón ends up being shot to death by a group of racist rednecks just inside the US border.

Machete then reunites with Luz and her group, the Network. They infiltrate a fundraiser at Voz’s base of operations. Machete realizes Voz was the one who killed Sartana and fights him. He severely burns Voz’s face, disfiguring him to the extent that Voz is forced to wear a metallic, silver mask. Meanwhile, Vasquez shoots Luz in her good eye, completely blinding her. Luz kills Vasquez in return but is captured by Voz, frozen in Carbonite and taken aboard his ship.

Machete jumps on the missile as it launches and disarms it in mid-air, while Voz boards the ship and departs with the Zaror clones, his supporters, as well as Luz. The disarmed missile then plunges into the Rio Grande and Machete is rescued by President Rathcock, who asks him to follow Voz into space and kill him. Machete agrees and uses a SpaceX rocket to depart to Voz’s Station in Earth’s orbit, where he is given a laser machete to start his mission.

In a post-credits scene, an outtake from the Luz and Blanca fight scene is included followed by a shot of President Rathcock in front of a space background inquisitively brandishing two of Voz’s guns (the molecular disruptor and the same pistol used to kill Sartana) before firing wildly at an off-screen target.

Machete Kills Movie Poster

Machete Kills

Directed by: Robert Rodriguez
Starring: Danny Trejo, Michelle Rodriguez, Sofía Vergara, Amber Heard, Antonio Banderas, Cuba Gooding, Jr.
Screenplay by: Kyle Ward
Caylah Eddleblute: Steve Joyner
Cinematography byB Robert Rodriguez
Film Editing by: Rebecca Rodriguez, Robert Rodriguez
Costume Design by: Nina Proctor
Set Decoration by: David Hack
Music by: Robert Rodriguez, Carl Thiel
MPAA Rating: R For strong bloody violence throughout, language and some sexual content.
Studio: 20th Century Fox
Release Date: October 11, 2013

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Carrie

Carrie Movie - Chloe Grace Moritz

Taglines: You will know her name Carrie.

A sheltered high school girl unleashes her newly developed telekinetic powers after she is pushed too far by her peers. Carrie White is a lonely and awkward teen who is constantly bullied at school by her peers, and beaten at home at the hands of her religious mother. But Carrie has a secret: She’s been blessed with the terrifying power of telekinesis; and when her peers decide to pull a prank on her at prom, they’ll soon learn a deadly lesson: If you play with fire, you get burned.

Carrie is an American supernatural horror film. It is the third film adaptation of Stephen King’s 1974 novel of the same name, though Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Screen Gems, who produced the film, employed a script that was reportedly more faithful to King’s original novel. The film stars Chloë Grace Moretz as the titular Carrie White, and Julianne Moore as Carrie’s mother, Margaret White. Following the initial announcement of March 15, 2013 as the release date, the film’s public launch was later postponed to October 18, 2013.

About the Story

Alone in her home, Margaret White (Julianne Moore), a religious, yet disturbed woman, gives birth to a baby girl, intending to kill the infant but changes her mind. Years later, her daughter Carrie (Chloë Grace Moretz), is a shy, unassertive girl, who nears her graduation from Ewen High School in Maine.

Carrie Movie

While showering after gym class at school, Carrie experiences her first menstrual period. She naively thinks she is bleeding to death. The other girls ridicule her, and longtime bully Chris Hargensen (Portia Doubleday) records the event on her smartphone and uploads it to YouTube. Gym teacher Miss Desjardin (Judy Greer) comforts Carrie and sends her home with Margaret, who believes menstruation is a sin. Margaret demands that Carrie abstain from showering with the other girls. When Carrie refuses, Margaret hits her with a Bible and locks her in her “prayer closet”. As Carrie screams to be let out, a crack appears on the door, and the crucifix in the closet begins to bleed.

Miss Desjardin informs the girls who teased Carrie that they will endure boot-camp style detention for their behavior. When Chris refuses, she is suspended from school and banned from the prom. She storms out, vowing revenge.

Carrie learns that she has telekinesis, the ability to move things with her mind. She researches her abilities, learning to harness them. Sue Snell (Gabriella Wilde) regrets teasing Carrie in the shower room and attempts to make amends by asking her boyfriend, Tommy Ross (Ansel Elgort), to take Carrie to the prom. Carrie accepts Tommy’s invitation. When she tells her mother, Margaret forbids Carrie to attend. Asking her mother to relent, Carrie manifests her telekinesis. Margaret believes this power comes from the Devil and is proof that Carrie has been corrupted by sin.

Carrie Movie

Chris, her boyfriend Billy Nolan (Alex Russell), and his friends plan revenge on Carrie. They kill a pig and drain its blood into a bucket. Margaret tries to prevent Carrie from going to the prom, but Carrie telekinetically locks her mother in the closet. At the prom, Carrie is nervous and shy, but Tommy kindly puts her at ease. As part of Chris and Billy’s plan, Chris’s friend, Tina Blake (Zoë Belkin), slips fake ballots into the voting box, which name Carrie and Tommy prom queen and king.

At home, Sue receives a text from Chris taunting her about her revenge on Carrie. Sue drives to the prom, arriving just as Carrie and Tommy are about to be crowned. Sue sees the bucket of pig’s blood dangling above Carrie but, before she can warn anyone, Miss Desjardin hustles her out, suspecting that Sue is planning to humiliate Carrie.

Chris dumps the bucket of pig’s blood onto Carrie and Tommy. Chris’s shower video appears on large screens above the stage, inciting laughter from some in the audience, until the bucket falls onto Tommy’s head, killing him. Enraged, Carrie takes her revenge telekinetically, killing several of the students and staff (except for Miss Desjardin). A fire breaks out and, as the school burns to the ground, Carrie walks away, leaving a trail of fire and destruction in her wake. Chris and Billy attempt to flee in Billy’s car. Chris urges Billy to run Carrie over, but Carrie flips the car into a gas station, setting the place on fire them.

Carrie Movie

Carrie arrives home and she and Margaret embrace. Margaret tells Carrie about the night of Carrie’s conception. After having shared a bed platonically with her husband, they yielded to temptation one night and, after praying for strength, Carrie’s father “took” Margaret, who enjoyed the experience. Margaret attacks Carrie, who attempts to flee but kills her with several sharp tools. She becomes hysterical and makes stones rain from the sky to crush the house. When Sue arrives, a furious Carrie grabs her with her powers, but senses something inside Sue, and tells her that her baby is a girl. Carrie pushes a stunned Sue out of the house to safety as the house collapses and apparently kills the Whites.

About the Production

In May 2011, representatives from MGM and Screen Gems announced that the two companies were producing a film remake of Carrie. The two studios hired Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark playwright Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa to write a screenplay that delivers “a more faithful adaption” of King’s novel—Aguirre-Sacasa previously adapted King’s work The Stand into a comic book in 2008.

Upon hearing of the new adaptation, King remarked, “The real question is why, when the original was so good?” He also suggested Lindsay Lohan for the main role and stated that “it [the film] would certainly be fun to cast”. Actress Sissy Spacek, who played Carrie in de Palma’s adaptation, expressed an opinion on the choice of Lohan for the character of Carrie White, stating that she “was like, ‘Oh my God, she’s really a beautiful girl’ and so I was very flattered that they were casting someone to look like me instead of the real Carrie described in the book. It’s gonna be real interesting.” In March 2012, the role of Carrie White was offered to Chloë Grace Moretz, who accepted the role.

Kimberly Peirce directed the film, while Moore starred as Margaret White and Gabriella Wilde played Sue Snell. Alex Russell and Ansel Elgort are also members of the main cast, and Judy Greer played the gym teacher Miss Desjardin.

Carrie Movie Poster

Carrie

Directed by: Kimberly Peirce
Starring: Chloë Grace Moretz, Judy Greer, Portia Doubleday, Alex Russell, Gabriella Wilde, Ansel Elgort, Julianne Moore, Cynthia Preston
Screenplay by: Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa
Production Design by: Carol Spier
Cinematography by: Steve Yedlin
Film Editing by: Lee Percy, Nancy Richardson
Costume Design by: Luis Sequeira
Art Direction by: Nigel Churcher
Music by: Marco Beltrami
MPAA Rating: R for bloody violence, disturbing images, language and some sexual content.
Studio: Sony ScreenGems, Metro Goldwyn Mayer
Release Date: October 18, 2013

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