Category: Other Studios

A Short History of Decay

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A Short History of Decay, Emmanuelle Chriqui, Bryan Greenberg, Kathleen Rose Perkins, Linda Lavin, Harris Yulin, Rebecca Dayan, Barbara Weetman

It ooesn’t get better than this.

The movie A Shorty History Of Decay tells the story of Nathan Fisher, a thirty-something Brooklyn “hipster” (Bryan Greenberg) whose writing career is stalled, much to the chagrin of his ambitious live-in girlfriend, Erika (Emmanuelle Chriqui).

When she unceremoniously dumps him, Nathan retreats into a depressive funk, not knowing where to turn– finish the novel? work on the play?– when he gets a call from his brother in Florida telling him his father has been hospitalized. Racing down to “snowbird” central, Nathan finds his father (Harris Yulin) on the mend (albeit grumpy), and his normally addled mother (Linda Lavin) a bit hazier than usual.

His quick visit turns into an extended stay during which he discovers that his aging parents are actually in much better control of their lives than he is. He also meets a woman (Kathleen Rose Perkins)–his mother’s manicurist, no less– who is the polar opposite of Erika, but who may just be exactly what Nathan needs.

A Short History of Decay is an American comedy film written and directed by Michael Maren. It stars Bryan Greenberg, Linda Lavin, Harris Yulin, Emmanuelle Chriqui, Benjamin King and Kathleen Rose Perkins. Though its title is taken from the work of philosophy by Emil Cioran, it is not an adaptation of the book.

The film was shot in October and November 2012 in Wilmington, North Carolina, Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina and New York City. It premiered at the Hamptons International Film Festival on October 12, 2013 and it opened theatrically at the Village East Cinema on May 16, 2014.

A Short History of Decay Movie Poster

A Short History of Decay

Directed by: Michael Maren
Starring: Emmanuelle Chriqui, Bryan Greenberg, Kathleen Rose Perkins, Linda Lavin, Harris Yulin, Rebecca Dayan, Barbara Weetman
Screenplay by: Michael Maren
Production Design by: Matthew Petersen
Cinematography by: Nancy Schreiber
Film Editing by: Timothy Snell
Costume Design by: Hayley Swinson
Art Direction by: Harrison Colby
MPAA Rating: R for language including sexual references.
Studio: Paladin
Release Date: May 16, 2014

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In the Blood

In the Blood Movie

F-list actress Gina Carano stars as Ava, a trained fighter with a dark past in the movie In The Blood.

When her new husband (fellow F-lister Cam Gigandet) vanishes during their Caribbean honeymoon, Ava uncovers a violent underworld of conspiracy in the middle of an island paradise. Armed with a deadly set of skills, Ava sets out to discover the truth – and to take down the men she thinks are responsible for his abduction, one by one.

The movie In The Blood gets a very limited theatrical release (second and third run cinemas) the same day that it debuts on Video On Demand.

Film Review: In the Blood

I’ll be honest about this film, I am NOT a big action film fan nor do I like ultra-violent films. In the Blood is clearly BOTH of these— especially the latter. The amazing thing is that although the violence made me cringe, it was also a movie that kept me glued to the screen…and my adrenalin pumping!

The film stars Gina Carano and if you’ve never heard of Miss Carano, I wouldn’t be surprised. She’s only done a few films, though she is famous…as an MMA and Muay Thai fighter!! And, as you’d expect from a woman with such training, her skills are INSANELY good. Heck, she seems tougher and more capable than all the male action stars of the genre—and she makes it all look so real! By comparison, films by Van Damme and Steven Seagal look like kids’ films!!! I also love Carano because although she is pretty, she’s NOT the Hollywood type. She has real curves and looks like she’s NOT the product of plastic surgery and bulimia!!

In the Blood Movie - Gina Carano

The film is set on some fictional Spanish-speaking Caribbean nation or, perhaps, they intend it to be the Dominican Republic (there are three Spanish-speaking countries in the Caribbean—and it’s not Cuba and they said it wasn’t Puerto Rico in the movie*)—they never say. Regardless, the place is corrupt…very, very, very corrupt.

It’s so corrupt that when an American tourist is kidnapped (or possibly killed), those responsible for it pay EVERYONE to pretend it never happened—even the cops! So, this leaves Ana (Carano) all alone in a hostile country where practically no one seems able or willing to help. The neat thing about the film is that it is wonderful at misdirection. It’s a very smart film as again and again I was surprised by who was behind all this and why. And, how it all ends is simply impossible to anticipate**.

Overall, this is a super-high action film with an amazing heroine—one that doesn’t stand around waiting to be saved by a man—and I love that. Carano plays the real thing—and action hero in every sense of the word— and a darn scary one!!

So do I recommend the film? Well, I don’t know. Its violence level is off the charts and it’s certainly NOT a film for the kids, your mother or Father Flannigan! Plus, even if you THINK you like action films, you might just find this one too intense, bloody and violent. Often, Ana kills—much like Sonny Chiba did in his Street Fighter films. But aside from the violence, it’s an exceptional film all around. Heck, even NOW after the movie’s been over for some time, my heart is STILL pounding… it’s that intense and that well made.

*They said the film is NOT set in Puerto Rico and talked about how they can escape to the nearby island of Puerto Rico. But, in reality, the film was actually made in Puerto Rico. I don’t know what this will do for tourism!

**If you SERIOUSLY anticipated all the twists, turns and surprises in this film, drop me a line. You are DEFINITELY psychic and I want to talk to you about the Florida Lottery.

In the Blood Movie Poster

In the Blood

Directed by: John Stockwell
Starring: Gina Carano, Cam Gigandet, Danny Trejo, Luis Guzmán, Stephen Lang, Eloise Mumford, Yvette Yates, Hannah Cowley
Screenplay by: James Robert Johnston, Bennett Yellin
Production Design by: Monica Monserrate
Cinematography by: Pedro Juan López
Film Editing by: Lucas Eskin, Doug Walker
Costume Design by: Milagros Núñez
Set Decoration by: Carmen Marie Colon Mejia
Music by: Paul Haslinger
MPAA Rating: R for strong violence and language.
Studio: Anchor Bay Films
Release Date: April 4, 2014

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Just a Sigh – Le Temps de l’aventure

Just a Sigh - Le Temps de l'aventure

In the movie Just A Sigh, actress Alix (Emmanuelle Devos) meets a mysterious Irishman (Gabriel Byrne) on the train to Paris, where she is headed for an audition. Immediately drawn to him from this chance encounter, she follows him, and falls in love with him, before facing what could be a new life.

Alix and Doug were not supposed to meet, but they did. Alix was on a train bound for Paris where she was going to audition for a film, having just left Calais where she had performed in an Ibsen play. Doug, a literature professor, had left England for Paris, where he was to attend the funeral of a dear friend.

They were not supposed to meet and yet they did. They did because Alix, whose relationship with her boyfriend was at a crossroads, fancied this handsome serious-looking gentleman on the Paris-bound train. They did because Doug, although not in the mood for love, quickly fell for her. They were not supposed to meet but their brief encounter would prove to be overwhelming.

Just a Sigh - Le Temps de l'aventure

Film Review: Just a Sigh

A tonally heterogeneous but emotionally coherent dramedy centered around a beautifully modulated turn by Emmanuelle Devos

Cut off from the daily grind by a dead phone battery and overdrawn credit card, a Gallic actress decides to follow her own whims for a day in “Just a Sigh,” a tonally heterogeneous but emotionally coherent dramedy from Jerome Bonnell (“Queen of Clubs”). This is the young helmer’s fifth and most mature work, frequently using long takes to showcase a beautifully modulated turn from Emmanuelle Devos in something approaching real time. Though tough to pigeonhole genre-wise, the Tribeca competition title should interest upscale arthouse buyers, with the presence of co-star Gabriel Byrne an added marketing bonus.

A striking single take opens the film as it follows Paris-based thesp Alix (Devos) from making a personal phone call backstage to waiting in the wings of a provincial theater before leaping onstage for a performance of Ibsen’s “The Lady From the Sea.” As in that play — never properly excerpted, a classy move that suggests Bonnell isn’t unnecessarily transfixed by intertextuality — the female protag has to choose between the man she shares her life with and a traveling stranger who arouses an inexplicable passion in her.

Alix — whose b.f., Antoine (voiced by Denis Menichot), remains offscreen — meets the mystery man the next day on the early morning train back to Paris, where she has an audition before having to travel back to Calais for an evening performance. They catch each other’s eye, and the man, who turns out to be an English speaker (Byrne), finally makes conversation with her as they arrive, asking for directions to the Basilica of St. Clotilde.

Drowsy, too shy, not entirely at ease in English and perhaps somewhat nervous and absent-minded because of her upcoming tryout, Alix leaves the enigmatic man be when another passenger steps in to give him more precise directions. But after her somewhat humiliating yet extraordinary audition — a simple, one-sided telephone conversation, impressively played in two entirely different registers — Alix’s thoughts drift back to the stranger on the train. Perhaps subconsciously encouraged by the fact that she can’t get hold of Antoine because of her cell-phone issues, she finds herself taking the subway to the church the stranger asked about, where she sees him taking part in a funeral procession.

This is only the film’s setup; less than 30 minutes have passed by the time Alix finds the man, whose name turns out to be Douglas. While it’s always clear what Alix is thinking and going through, Bonnell and Devos have little need for explanatory dialogue; indeed, Alix either is on her own or keeps to herself before tentatively making contact with Douglas, at which point she’s asked to tag along to a bar by another memorial-service attendee, Rodolphe (Gilles Privat).

After its quietly observational but always fully comprehensible character-drama setup, the film eases into whispery romance as Alix and Douglas try to see where their initial spark takes them. A revelation about Alix’s unexpected new role in her relationship with Antoine further puts this unexpected encounter into perspective.

But the film also contains unexpected bursts of humor, starting with Rodolphe’s chuckle-inducing maladroitness, and culminating in a terrific scene that combines high drama and lowbrow comedy when Alix hits up her sister (Aurelia Petit) for cash. Though the lack of access to phones or funds often feels contrived in films, Bonnell uses it here to illustrate character — Alix is insouciant about money and not interested in technology — and, at the same time, to suggest that for one day, she’s a fish out of the water in her hometown, leading her to do things she wouldn’t normally do.

The tonal shifts are all handled smoothly; Devos can switch gears mid-scene like nobody’s business, but Bonnell also keeps things coherent with long takes that let humor, drama and introspection coexist side by side, just like in real life. The use of classical works on the soundtrack by composers such as Vivaldi tries, perhaps a tad too self-consciously, to infuse the film with gravitas, though they’re nicely offset by the different varieties of live music Alix and Douglas encounter as they amble through Paris on what turns out to be World Music Day.

Just a Sigh - Le Temps de l'aventure Poster

Just a Sigh

Directed by: Jérôme Bonnell
Starring: Emmanuelle Devos, Gabriel Byrne, Gilles Privat, Aurélia Petit, Laurent Capelluto, Denis Ménochet, Sébastien Pouderoux
Screenplay by: Jérôme Bonnell
Production Design by: Anne Bachala
Cinematography by: Pascal Lagriffoul
Film Editing by: Julie Dupré
Costume Design by: Carole Gérard
Music by: Raf Keunen
MPAA Rating: None.
Studio: Distrib Films
Release Date: March 21, 2014

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It Felt Like Love

It Felt Like Love Movie

Eliza Hittman’s powerful debut feature tells the story of Lila (Gina Piersanti, in a stunning debut), a fourteen year old spending a hot summer in a blue-collar Brooklyn neighborhood far removed from the bustling city. Awkward, lonely, and often playing the third wheel, Lila is determined to emulate the sexual exploits of her more experienced best friend.

She fixates on Sammy, a tough older guy, when she hears that “he’ll sleep with anyone.” Deluded in her romantic pursuit, Lila tries desperately to insert herself into Sammy’s gritty world, but in doing so she puts herself into a dangerously vulnerable situation.

It Felt Like Love is a 2013 independent drama film, the first feature film directed by Eliza Hittman. It Felt Like Love premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival, and subsequently screened at such festivals as International Film Festival Rotterdam, Maryland Film Festival and Giffoni Film Festival. It was acquired by Variance Films in November 2013, with a theatrical release in 2014.

It Felt Like Love - Gina Piersanti

Film Review: It Felt Like Love

An evocatively shot, rawly unsentimental coming-of-ager from debut helmer Eliza Hittman, “It Felt Like Love” follows a vulnerable teen who envies the sexual experience of her confident older friend and determines to have a relationship of her own.

An evocatively shot, rawly unsentimental coming-of-ager from debut helmer Eliza Hittman, “It Felt Like Love” follows a vulnerable teen who envies the sexual experience of her confident older friend and determines to have a relationship of her own. The writer-director’s stress on the small, degrading details that attend yearning as well as her protagonist’s desperation and self-deception make it more mood piece than straightforward narrative, but the ultra-confident production proves that Hittman’s a talent to watch. Nevertheless, critical and fest admiration are likely to trump commercial success here. The microbudget indie will next court Euro buyers from Rotterdam’s Tiger competition.

It’s summer in working-class Brooklyn. Wide-eyed, 14-year-old Lila (Gina Piersanti) tries to learn from her experience as third wheel in the relationship of charismatic Chiara (Giovanna Salimeni) and her boyfriend Patrick (Jesse Cordasco). Not only is she witness to their heavy petting sessions on the beach and in the bedroom, but Chiara confides intimate details that virginal Lila only pretends to understand.

When Lila sets her sights on thuggish college boy Sammy (Ronen Rubinstein), she impetuously claims a level of sexual expertise that sets her up for humiliation and heartbreak. Although Sammy isn’t interested, he doesn’t — at first — reject her outright, and the mere fact he answers her texts encourages her to spin more lies: to Chiara, her neighbor Nate (Case Prime), her distracted father (Kevin Anthony Ryan) and herself.

Hittman’s screenplay was written around the talents of her impressive non-pro cast, with the modern-dance expertise of Piersanti and Salimeni, both highly credible thesps, figuring prominently. However, with the central emphasis on Lila’s unsentimental education, the narrative fails to provide the character with enough likability to balance her obsessive pursuit of Sammy and her ill-judged bravado.

In her interactions with her father, Lila comes off a typical sullen teen. It is only late into the film when audiences learn something that might be an underlying psychological factor for her behavior. The odd, unclimactic final scene brings the dance rehearsals full circle, but still feels able to be improved on.

Tightly framed, expressive lensing by Sean Porter (“Eden”) supports the poetic realism of the visuals, and calls to mind the beach photographs of Rineke Dijkstra, Lynne Ramsay’s “Ratcatcher” and Cate Shortland’s “Somersault.” Spot-on costume and accessory design by Sarah Maiorino telegraphs reams of information about the characters while feeling completely natural.

The music is diegetic, with song selections related to the hip-hop and rapping talents of the young male cast. More important is the rich sound design, in which the heartbeat of nature, particularly the roar of the waves, align the audience with the rush of Lila’s emotions.

It Felt Like love Movie Poster

It Felt Like Love

Directed by: Eliza Hittman
Starring: Gina Piersanti, Giovanna Salimeni, Ronen Rubinstein, Sophia Jurewicz, Anna David, Maria Salimeni, Viktoria Vinyarska
Screenplay by: Eliza Hittman
Production Design by: James Boxer
Cinematography by: Sean Porter
Film Editing by: Scott Cummings
Carlos Marques-Marcet
Costume Design by: Sarah Maiorino
MPAA Rating: None.
Studio: Variance Films
Release Date: March 21, 2014

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Blind

Körlük - Blind Filmi - Ellen Dorrick Petersen

Having recently lost her sight, Ingrid retreats to the safety of her home – a place where she can feel in control, alone with her husband and her thoughts. But Ingrid’s real problems lie within, not beyond the walls of her apartment, and her deepest fears and repressed fantasies soon take over.

Blind is a Norwegian drama film written and directed by Eskil Vogt. The film premiered in-competition in the World Cinema Dramatic Competition at 2014 Sundance Film Festival on January 19, 2014. Vogt received the Screenwriting Award for Blind at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival. The film was later screened in the Panorama section of the 64th Berlin International Film Festival. The film has been nominated for the 2014 Nordic Council Film Prize.

Blind received positive reviews upon its premiere at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival. Review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes reports that 100% of 20 film critics have given the film a positive review, with a rating average of 7.7 out of 10.

Scott Foundas of Variety, said in his review that “Ace Norwegian scribe Eskil Vogt makes a sparkling directorial debut with an alternately tragic and playful tale of a blind authoress.” Boyd van Hoeij in his review for The Hollywood Reporter called the film “An ambitiously constructed screenplay translates into a film that’s easier to admire than to love.”

William Bibbiani from CraveOnline praised the film by saying that “Blind exists as a nebulous construction, ever shifting but ultimately centered around a lovely and funny love-quadrangle with curious characters and consistent insight. The film’s curious blend of the sensual and the cerebral manages to engage even when you begin to lack confidence about whether anything is actually happening at all.”

Blind Movie - Ellen Dorrit Petersen

Review for Bilnd Movie

A Norwegian woman who has lost her sight prefers to stay within the confines of her own home, memories and thoughts in Blind, the skillful if a tad cold directorial debut of screenwriter Eskil Vogt (Joachim Trier’s Reprise and Oslo, August 31st).

Though the film’s structure makes it very hard to warm to the protagonist until very late into the proceedings, Vogt finally manages to not only suggest what the world of a blind person must be like in terms of the countless everyday impracticalities but also what it could do to the inner life of a thirty-something woman who’s married and would’ve liked to have children.

The blind Ingrid (Ellen Dorrit Petersen) opens the film in voice-over, conjuring up the image of a tree before the camera shows what she’s talking about. “Places are harder to remember,” she continues, describing how it helps if she’s frequented them often before she lost her eyesight. The film then shows at length what should in theory be a facile domestic task: making some tea and then sitting down to drink it. Already, Vogt is implying with the minute way of observing the action that it pays for the viewer to pay close attention to details.

Audiences will need to do just that, as the narrative, much of it accompanied by Ingrid’s voice-over, keeps introducing new material that’ll inspire double takes or necessitate backtracking through the story.

Ingrid introduces us to the lonely and somewhat portly Einar (Marius Kolbenstvedt), who is addicted to fetish-dominated porn (shown in all its explicit glory) though, as Ingrid remarks, “the Internet can’t tell him how it feels to touch those bodies.” Einar often spies on the lonely young woman who lives in the building across the street, Elin (Vera Vitali), a divorced Swedish mother whose shared custody of her child has made her a prisoner of Norway. In an early bravura sequence, Einar provides the sound to the mute image he sees of Elin in her flat by switching to the same TV channel and eating the same snack. It’s an early indication of the importance of sound in this story narrated by a blind woman.

There’s also the married architect, Morten (Henrik Rafaelsen), qualified by his wife as extremely boring, though apparently not boring enough to secretly communicate with Elin via Internet chat. The film’s first half toggles between the stories of these three characters and the narrator, as it gradually emerges that Ingrid, when home alone, has taken to writing stories and that not everything we see is necessarily real, as a meeting of old student buddies Morten and Einar at a café suggests when, suddenly, the background behind one of the characters suggests he’s been miraculously transported to another place though the conversation between the two simply seems to continue.

Blind Movie Poster

Blind

Directed by: Eskil Vogt
Starring: Ellen Dorrit Petersen, Henrik Rafaelsen, Vera Vitali, Marius Kolbenstvedt, Stella Kvam Young, Nikki Butenschøn
Screenplay by: Eskil Vogt
Production Design by: Jørgen Stangebye Larsen
Cinematography by: Thimios Bakatakis
Film Editing by: Jens Christian Fodstad
Costume Design by: Ellen Dæhli Ystehede
Set Decoration by: Solfrid Kjetså
Music by: Henk Hofstede
Studio: Cinéart
Release Date: January 19, 2014

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Mr. Turner

Mr. Turner Movie

Mr. Turner explores the last quarter century of the great if eccentric British painter J.M.W. Turner (1775-1851). Profoundly affected by the death of his father, loved by a housekeeper he takes for granted and occasionally exploits sexually, he forms a close relationship with a seaside landlady with whom he eventually lives incognito in Chelsea, where he dies.

Throughout this, he travels, paints, stays with the country aristocracy, visits brothels, is a popular if anarchic member of the Royal Academy of Arts, has himself strapped to the mast of a ship so that he can paint a snowstorm, and is both celebrated and reviled by the public and by royalty.

Mr. Turner is a British biographical drama film, written and directed by Mike Leigh, and starring Timothy Spall, Dorothy Atkinson, Paul Jesson, Marion Bailey and Ruth Sheen. The film concerns the life and career of British artist J. M. W. Turner (played by Spall). It premiered in competition for the Palme d’Or at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, where Spall won the award for Best Actor[4] and cinematographer Dick Pope received a special jury prize for the film’s cinematography.

Leigh has described Turner as “a great artist: a radical, revolutionary painter,” explaining, “I felt there was scope for a film examining the tension between this very mortal, flawed individual, and the epic work, the spiritual way he had of distilling the world.”

Mr. Turner Movie Poster

Mr. Turner

Directed by: Mike Leigh
Starring: Timothy Spall, Paul Jesson, Dorothy Atkinson, Ruth Sheen, Sandy Foster, Amy Dawson, Lesley Manville, Sinead Matthews
Screenplay by: Mike Leigh
Production Design by: Suzie Davies
Cinematography by: Dick Pope
Film Editing by: Jon Gregory
Costume Design by: Jacqueline Durran
Set Decoration by: Charlotte Watts
Art Direction by: Dan Taylor
Music by: Gary Yershon
MPAA Rating: R for some sexual content.
Studio: Entertainment One
Release Date: December 19, 2014

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The Better Angels

The Better Angels Movie

Indiana, 1817. The entire nation, only 40 years old and a few years removed from a second war of independence, is raw. Men, women, and children alike must battle nature and disease to survive in remote log cabins. This is young Abraham Lincoln’s world. Spanning three years of the future president’s childhood, The Better Angels explores his family, the hardships that shaped him, the tragedy that marked him forever, and the two women who guided him to immortality.

The Better Angels tells the story of Abraham Lincoln’s childhood in the harsh wilderness of Indiana and the hardships that shaped him, the tragedy that marked him for ever and the two women who guided him to immortality.

The Better Angels is an American biographical drama-historical film about the formative years of United States President Abraham Lincoln directed by A. J. Edwards. The film had its premiere at 2014 Sundance Film Festival on January 18, 2014.

The film was later screened in the Panorama section of the 64th Berlin International Film Festival on February 8, 2014. In March 2014, Amplify acquired the distribution rights of the film, with schedule to release the film November 7, 2014.

The Better Angels Movie Poster

The Better Angels

Directed by: A.J. Edwards
Starring: Jason Clarke, Diane Kruger, Brit Marling, Wes Bentley, Braydon Denney, Cameron Mitchell Williams, Madison Stiltner, Veanne Cox
Screenplay by: A.J. Edwards
Production Design by: Caroline Hanania
Cinematography by: Matthew J. Lloyd
Film Editing by: Alex Milan
Costume Design by: Lisa Tomczeszyn
Set Decoration by: Amy Morrison
Art Direction by: Christopher Tandon, John Vogt
Music by: Hanan Townshend
MPAA Rating: PG for thematic elements and brief smoking.
Studio: Amplify Releasing
Release Date: November 7, 2014

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Before I Go to Sleep

Before I Go to Sleep - Nicole Kidman

Taglines: Don’t trust anyone.

Due to a catastrophic accident in her mid-twenties, Christine, now a forty-seven-year-old writer, is incapable of forming and maintaining new memories for more than a day. Trapped in an existence in which she wakes every day believing herself to be single and with a whole lifetime of choice ahead of her she discovers instead that she lives with her husband, Ben, with most decisions already made.

Through her meetings with a doctor who is helping her to recover her memory, Christine’s story begins to emerge, setting in motion a series of events that trigger startling consequences for her and all who love her, leading her to question whether the truth is sometimes better left forgotten.

Before I Go to Sleep is a British mystery thriller film directed and written by Rowan Joffé, based on a 2011 novel, Before I Go to Sleep by S. J. Watson. The film stars Nicole Kidman, Mark Strong, Colin Firth and Anne-Marie Duff.

About the Story

Forty-year-old Christine Lucas wakes up in bed with a man she does not know, in an unfamiliar house. The man explains that he is her husband, Ben, and that she suffered brain damage from a car accident ten years ago. Christine wakes up every morning with no memory of her life from her early twenties onwards. Every morning, after she wakes up, Ben has to explain to her what has happened.

Before I Go to Sleep

Christine receives treatment from Dr. Nasch, a neurologist at a local hospital. He gives her a camera for her to record her thoughts and progress at the end of each day, and calls her at home every morning to remind her to watch the video in the the camera. Dr. Nasch also instructs Christine to keep the camera hidden from Ben. Dr. Nasch reveals that Christine’s memory loss did not occur due to a car accident, but that Christine had been attacked and left for dead near an airport hotel. They surmise that Ben tells Christine it was a car accident to avoid upsetting her.

Over the course of treatment, Christine faintly remembers her friend, a red-haired woman named Claire. She asks Ben about Claire, and Ben tells her that Claire could not handle Christine’s condition, and ended contact from her. Later, Christine recalls that she had a son. She angrily confronts Ben over hiding their child, but Ben says their son had died of meningitis when he was eight years old. He avoided mentioning their dead son as it always upset her. Christine faintly remembers the name Mike, and believes it may be the name of her attacker.

Before I Go to Sleep - Nicole Kidman

Christine learns that, several years after her attack, Ben had placed her in an assisted care facility and divorced her. Ben states that it was due to the stress of dealing with her condition, coupled with their son’s death, but that he had had a change of heart and brought her home to live with him. Christine learns that Claire had been trying to contact her at the care facility, unaware that Ben had taken her away. Christine obtains Claire’s phone number and meets her. Claire reveals that Christine had embarked on an affair prior to her attack, while Ben and Claire had had a one-time sexual encounter, due to their shared grief at Christine’s memory loss. Feeling an obligation to keep Ben and Christine’s marriage intact, Claire chose to end contact.

Out of gratitude for his love and care, Christine decides to let Ben see the videos she has made on the digital camera. However, Ben angrily accuses Christine of having an affair with Dr. Nasch, strikes her in the face, and storms out. On the telephone, Claire tells Christine that Ben claims to not have seen Christine for several years. Claire asks Christine to describe the “Ben” she is living with, and they realize he is not Ben at all. Christine attempts to escape the house, but “Ben” renders her unconscious.

Before I Go to Sleep Movie Poster

Before I Go to Sleep

Directed by: Rowan Joffe
Starring: Nicole Kidman, Mark Strong, Colin Firth, Anne-Marie Duff, Rosie MacPherson, Adam Levy, Jing Lusi
Screenplay by: Rowan Joffe
Production Design by: Kave Quinn
Cinematography by: Ben Davis
Film Editing by: Melanie Oliver
Costume Design by: Michele Clapton
Set Decoration by: Niamh Coulter
Music by: Ed Shearmur
MPAA Rating: R for some brutal violence and language.
Studio: BBC Films
Release Date: October 31, 2014

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Love, Rosie

Love, Rosie Movie

Taglines: They just can’t themselves together.

Love, Rosie is a 2014 British-German romantic comedy-drama film directed by Christian Ditter and written by Juliette Towhidi, based on the 2004 novel Where Rainbows End by Irish author Cecelia Ahern. The film stars Lily Collins, Sam Claflin, Tamsin Egerton, Suki Waterhouse, Jaime Winstone and Lily Laight.

Alex and Rosie have been best friends for almost as long as they can remember. After depicting their time together as children, the movie jumps to Rosie making a speech at what appears to be a wedding, while staring at Alex, implying it may be his wedding but not hers. The movie switches to 12 years earlier, where Rosie is upset because of getting drunk during her 18th birthday. Alex comes over to discuss the previous night’s events but pauses when Rosie tells him how she wished it never happened.

The pair later go to the beach together to attend a party where ‘the fittest guy in [their]grade’ asks Rosie to the school dance, which she rejects saying she is going with Alex. Alex later tells her that an attractive and ‘out of his league’ girl named Bethany wants to go with him. After a fight between the two, Alex and Bethany go to the dance along with Greg and Rosie. After some dancing, Bethany and Alex share a passionate kiss and Greg and Rosie get a private room. The two then have sex but due to Greg’s inexperience, the condom comes off and gets stuck inside Rosie. She immediately calls Alex who gets her to a hospital then takes her home.

Love, Rosie Movie

Later, Rosie receives a letter telling her that she has been accepted into Boston University for the hotel management course that she wants to do. After running over to tell Alex, she overhears him and Bethany having sex and vomits into a handbag. She leaves without seeing Alex and goes to a pharmacist, saying she has been feeling nauseous lately.

The woman behind the counter, Ruby, gives her a pregnancy test which turns out to be positive despite her taking the morning after pill. Rosie decides against telling Alex after he tells her that he has been accepted by Harvard, not wanting him to stay for her. Rosie says goodbye to Alex at an airport as he heads to his university, saying she will be just behind him. Rosie gives birth to a baby girl, whom she names Katie, and decides not to give her up for adoption despite prior plans. Rosie raises Katie as a single mother.

A few months later, Rosie, with baby Katie, bumps into Bethany in the street. Bethany tells Alex, who immediately comes back to England from America to visit Rosie. The two become friends again and Alex becomes the godfather of baby Katie.

Back in America, Alex meets a girl in a bar and they soon move in together. Five years later, after Alex convinces Rosie to visit, Rosie discovers that Alex’s girlfriend is incredibly posh and snobby, taking them to an art gallery of a man named Herb. Upon telling Alex that she didn’t see them as a good couple, they fight and Rosie goes back to England. During the trip she also finds out that Alex’s girlfriend is pregnant.

Greg (who earlier moved to another country after hearing of Rosie’s pregnancy) visits Rosie at work having received her letter and a drawing by Katie. After some arguing, Rosie decides that Greg can see Katie. The three become a family and Alex then receives an invitation to Rosie’s wedding to Greg. Rosie marries Greg but notices Alex’s absence from the event. Rosie’s parents go on a trip and Rosie soon receives a call from her mother saying that Rosie’s father has died. At the funeral, Alex visits and the two reconcile. Greg is also present but noticeably drunk and rude to Alex and Rosie.

Love, Rosie Movie Poster

Love, Rosie

Directed by: Christian Ditter
Starring: Lily Collins, Sam Claflin, Tamsin Egerton, Suki Waterhouse, Jaime Winstone, Christian Cooke, Art Parkinson
Screenplay by; Juliette Towhidi
Production Design by: Matthew Davies
Film Editing by: Tony Cranstoun
Costume Design by: Leonie Prendergast
Set Decoration by: Judy Farr
Music by: Ralf Wengenmayr
Studio: Arcade Films
Release Date: October 24, 2014

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Laggies

Laggies Movie

Taglines: A comedy about acting your age and other adult decisions.

Having spent her twenties comfortably inert, 28 year old Megan (Keira Knightley) reaches a crisis when she finds herself squarely in adulthood with no career prospects, no particular motivation to pursue any and no one to relate to, including her high school boyfriend (Mark Webber). When he proposes, Megan panics and given an opportunity to escape – at least temporarily – she hides out in the home of her new friend, 16-year-old Annika (Chloë Grace Moretz) and Annika’s world-weary single dad (Sam Rockwell).

Laggies (released in the United Kingdom as Say When) is a 2014 American romantic comedy film directed by Lynn Shelton and written by Andrea Seigel. The film stars Chloë Grace Moretz, Keira Knightley, Sam Rockwell, Ellie Kemper, Mark Webber, and Kaitlyn Dever. The film had its world premiere at 2014 Sundance Film Festival on January 17, 2014.

Laggies Movie

About the Story

When 28-year-old Megan visits her 11-year high school reunion, she realizes that very little has changed in her life. She still lives with her high school boyfriend Anthony, and works as a sign flipper for her father’s accounting company. When her boyfriend proposes, she panics and crosses paths with 16-year-old Annika, who convinces her to buy her and her friends alcohol and she hangs out with them for the rest of the night. Afterwards, she realizes that she needs to take a week off from her life and lies to her boyfriend, saying that she is going to a business seminar, but instead she goes to Annika’s house and spends time there and also with Annika’s attractive, single father Craig.

Laggies Movie Poster

Laggies

Directed by: Lynn Shelton
Starring: Keira Knightley, Chloë Grace Moretz, Sam Rockwell, Kaitlyn Dever, Jeff Garlin, Ellie Kemper, Mark Webber, Daniel Zovatto
Screenplay by: Andrea Seigel
Production Design by: John Lavin
Cinematography by: Benjamin Kasulke
Film Editing by: Nat Sanders
Costume Design by: Ronald Leamon
Set Decoration by: Tania Kupczak
Music by: Benjamin Gibbard
MPAA Rating: R for language, some sexual material and teen partying.
Studio: A24 Films
Release Date: October 24, 2014

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