Category: Erotic Movies

Blue Is the Warmest Color

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Blue Is the Warmest Color

Acclaimed French filmmaker Abdellatif Kechiche’s latest, based on Julie Maroh’s graphic novel, was the sensation of this year’s Cannes Film Festival even before it was awarded the Palme d’Or. Adèle Exarchopoulos is a young woman whose longings and ecstasies and losses are charted across a span of several years. Léa Seydoux (Midnight in Paris) is the older woman who excites her desire and becomes the love of her life. Kechiche’s movie is, like the films of John Cassavetes, an epic of emotional transformation that pulses with gestures, embraces, furtive exchanges, and arias of joy and devastation. It is a profoundly moving hymn to both love and life.

This is an amazing film about young love that is actually honest with its audience. There are countless of films about people falling in love, but when you see “Blue is the Warmest Colour”. You realize just how rare films are that make a sincere attempt to catch what it really is like to fall for someone, without sentimentality, forced cuteness or cheap emotional manipulation. This is the rare love story that has real emotional truth about it. The fact that it is about two women who fall for each other is almost secondary to the way the film catches the universality of what it is like to fall in love and maintain the relationship.

Blue Is the Warmest Color

“Blue is the Warmest Colour is a naturalistic and touching film, whether you’re gay, straight, bisexual, or whatever orientation. This is a film that can give you relationship advice and life guidance no matter what your orientation may be. It isn’t an indulgent film bringing only a unique gay relationship to light and nothing more, and it isn’t an ode to “coming out” and stockpiled clichés of “being different.” It shows how an interaction with a person can have a truly provocative impact on you as a person.

The struggles between the two lovers is depicted in breathtaking detail. The director masterfully captures all of the turmoil and hardship going on between Adele’s and Emma’s relationship. The movie’s long running time does not effect the film at all because you are so immersed into their characters. The sexual realization of Adele is perfectly shown in the movie. She is confused and doesn’t know what she wants, it is a typical teenage problem.

This movie is ultimately about Adele and her struggles to find her true self. The transformation that she experiences is utterly engrossing to watch. The film’s nearly three hour running time is devoted to showing the growth of her character and it is absolutely amazing to watch it unfold right in front of your eyes.The intimate scene’s between Adele and Emma are nothing short of miraculous in their depth and their honesty. The conversations are heartfelt, and the pain is evident and shared. It’s realism of the world we live in is honest and raw.

Blue Is the Warmest Color - Lea Seydoux

The movie owes so much of it’s emotional power to its two fantastic actresses. They really bring it their all in this. I’ve never had doubts of these two performances, the characters felt like real people and you felt so much for their relationship. Their emotional hardships feel completely real. The character’s flaws and insecurities feel so authentic because you actually believe them as real human beings. We never lose sight of their chemistry and devotion to one another, even in the most difficult of times.

The two of them are like fireworks, waiting to explode out. I cannot recommend this film enough to those of you out there who are interested in seeing this. This is one of the wisest and least condescending films I’ve seen this year. I congratulate the director, Abdellatif Kechiche and the two actresses, Adele Exarchopoulos and Lea Seydoux for an emotional and spiritual journey that had me compelled to the screen for 179 glorious minutes.

Development

Director and screenwriter Abdellatif Kechiche developed the premise for Blue Is the Warmest Colour while directing his second feature film, Games of Love and Chance. He met teachers “who felt very strongly about reading, painting, writing” and it inspired him to develop a script which charts the personal life and career of a female French teacher. However, the concept was only finalised a few years later when Kechiche chanced upon Julie Maroh’s graphic novel, and he saw how he could link his screenplay about a school teacher with Maroh’s love story between two young women.

Blue Is the Warmest Color - Adele Exerchopoulos

Casting

In late 2011, a casting call was held in Paris to find the ideal actress for the role of Adèle. Casting director Sophie Blanvillain first spotted Adèle Exarchopoulos and then arranged for her to meet Abdellatif Kechiche. Exarchopoulos described how her auditions with Kechiche over the course of two months consisted of improvisation of scenarios, discussions and also of them both sitting in a café, without talking, while he quietly observed her. It was later, a day before the New Year, that Kechiche decided to offer Exarchopoulos the leading role in the film; as he said in an interview, “I chose Adèle the minute I saw her. I had taken her for lunch at a brasserie. She ordered lemon tart and when I saw the way she ate it I thought, ‘It’s her!’”

On the other hand, Léa Seydoux was cast for the role of Emma, ten months before principal photography began in March 2012. Kechiche felt that Seydoux “shared her character’s beauty, voice, intelligence and freedom” and that she has “something of an Arabic soul”. He added on saying, “What was decisive during our meeting was her take on society: She’s very much tuned in to the world around her. She possesses a real social awareness, she has a real engagement with the world, very similar to my own. I was able to realise to how great an extent, as I spent a whole year with her between the time she was chosen for the role and the end of shooting.” Speaking to Indiewire on the preparation for her role, Seydoux said “During those ten months (before shooting) I was already meeting with him (Kechiche) and being directed. We would spend hours talking about women and life; I also took painting and sculpting lessons, and read a lot about art and philosophy.”

Blue is the Warmest Color Poster

Blue is the Warmest Color

Directed by: Abdellatif Kechiche
Starring: Léa Seydoux, Adèle Exarchopoulos, Salim Kechiouche, Jérémie Laheurte, Catherine Salée
Screenplay by: Julie Maroh, Abdellatif Kechiche, Ghalia Lacroix
Cinematography by: Sofian El Fani
Film Editing by: Sophie Brunet, Ghalia Lacroix, Albertine Lastera, Jean-Marie Lengelle, Camille Toubkis
Set Decoration by: Coline Débée, Julia Lemaire
MPAA Rating: NC-17
Studio: Wild Bunch Films
Release Date: October 25, 2013

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The Canyons

The Canyons Movie

Taglines: It’s not the hills.

The Canyons is an American thriller film directed by Paul Schrader and written by Bret Easton Ellis. The film is set in Los Angeles and stars Lindsay Lohan, James Deen, Nolan Gerard Funk, Amanda Brooks and Gus Van Sant. It received a limited release on August 2, 2013 at the IFC Center in New York City, the Bell Lightbox in Toronto, and on video on demand platforms. Despite negative reviews, Lohan received praise for her performance from some critics.

Notorious writer Bret Easton Ellis (American Psycho) and acclaimed director Paul Schrader (writer of Taxi Driver and director of American Gigolo) join forces for this explicitly erotic thriller about youth, glamour, sex and surveillance. Manipulative and scheming young movie producer Christian (adult film star James Deen) makes films to keep his trust fund intact, while his actress girlfriend and bored plaything, Tara (Lindsay Lohan), hides a passionate affair with an actor from her past. When Christian becomes aware of Tara’s infidelity, the young Angelenos are thrust into a violent, sexually-charged tour through the dark side of human nature.

The Canyons Movie

Principal photography began in July 2012 with the shooting of the first six minutes of the film in the bar of the Chateau Marmont Hotel in Los Angeles. Many key scenes were shot at the Malibu home of designer Vitus Mataré. Filming was moved to Westfield Century City mall in Los Angeles after a failed attempt to film at the Santa Monica Promenade. Scenes were also shot in Amoeba Records on Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood and Cafe Med restaurant at Sunset Plaza, West Hollywood, as well as Palihotel Melrose and The Churchill bar of The Orlando Hotel, both in the Beverly Grove neighborhood of Los Angeles.

Schrader says about filming The Canyons: “…we’re making art out of the remains of our empire. The junk that’s left over. And this idea of a film that was crowdfunded, cast online, with one actor from a celebrity culture, one actor from adult-film culture, a writer and director who have gotten beat up in the past—felt like a post-Empire thing. And then everything I was afraid of with Lindsay and James started to become a positive. I was afraid we wouldn’t be taken seriously and people would think it was a joke. My son and daughter didn’t want me to do it. That just shows you how conservative young kids are.

The Canyons Movie

The rough cut of the film was 1 hour 44 minutes long. Initial edits of the film were disappointing; the film was said to “drag”. Ellis, Schrader and Pope had a disagreement over the final cut of the film. After Schrader showed Steven Soderbergh the rough cut of the film, Soderbergh offered to cut it within three days. Schrader declined, telling The New York Times:

“The idea of 72 hours is a joke, it would take him 72 hours to look at all the footage. And you know what Soderbergh would do if another director offered to cut his film? [Puts up two middle fingers] That’s what Soderbergh would do.” Ellis is quoted as saying: “The film is so languorous. It’s an hour 30, and it seems like it’s three hours long. I saw this as a pranky noirish thriller, but Schrader turned it into, well, a Schrader film.”

On Ellis’ Podcast, he claims to now have a new appreciation of the film, saying he had trouble at first accepting Schrader’s vision of his material, but in the end, has come to an understanding over his reservations during the creative process. He also openly praises Lohan’s performance, calling it “searing,” and blames the film’s perceived ‘failures’ on Lohan’s reputation in the media, which has nothing to do about the film’s quality or her performance in the film. He continued with saying he believes The Canyons to have ended up as being a success both creatively and financially for all those involved. He concludes with saying he is very proud of the final product.

The Canyons Movie Poster

The Canyons

Directed by: Paul Schrader
Starring: Braxton Pope, Lindsay Lohan, Ross Levine, Kurt Kittleson, Beau Laughlin, Ricky Horne Jr, Ken Locsmandi
Screenplay by: Bret Easton Ellis
Production Design by: Stephanie J. Gordon
Cinematography by: John DeFazio
Film Editing by: Tim Silano
Costume Design by: Keely Crum
Music by: Brendan Canning
Studio: IFC Films
Release Date: August 2, 2013

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Crazy Kind of Love

Crazy Kind of Love Movie

While re-evaluating her life, a mother relies on her stoner son and his awkward brother to keep life interesting. When an unlikely romance blossoms between the youngest son and the girl next door, she realizes the key to her happiness can be found where she least expects it.

Crazy Kind of Love (aka Long Time Gone) is an American drama film directed by Sarah Siegel-Magness. The film is based on 1995 novel Angel Angel by April Stevens. The film stars include Amanda Crew, Zach Gilford, Aly Michalka, Eva Longoria and Virginia Madsen replacing Meg Ryan late in June 2011.

Sarah Siegel-Magness had been hired to direct the film adaptation, Meg Ryan was the first actress who attached to play Augusta, the central character of the story. Karen McCullah wrote the screenplay after optioning the book. On June 16, 2011, Variety reported that newcomer Graham Rogers joined the adaptation playing a teen son. Seth Jaret, Bobbi Sue Luther and Gary Magness are set to produced the film. True Blood actor Sam Trammell also joined the cast. In early July 2011, Madeline Zima, Eva Longoria, Zach Gilford and Aly Michalka signed and secured their respective roles.

Crazy Kind of Love Movie Poster

Crazy Kind of Love

Directed by: Sarah Siegel-Magness
Starring: Eva Longoria, Madeline Zima, Aly Michalka, Travis Fimmel, Amanda Crew, Sam Trammell
Screenplay by: Karen McCullah Lutz, April Stevens
Production Design by: Cynthia Kay Charette
Cinematography by: Dean Cundey
Film Editing by: Dana Congdon
Costume Design by: Caroline B. Marx
Set Decoration by: Nya Patrinos
Music by: Mario Grigorov
MPAA Rating: R for sexuality, language and brief drug use.
Studio: Phase 4 Films
Release Date: July 9, 2013

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